Video guest: Josephine Mwangi

May 2017
M T W T F S S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31 1 2 3 4



SELECT_TAGS :
















Twitter

Follow the CTA Brussels Daily

 

twitter logo

 

facebook logo cta

EDITO
Monday, 29 May 2017

The East African Community (EAC) is yet to fully implement the common market protocols which were meant to boost the region's trade, a new report has shown. The second East African Community Common Market Scorecard 2016 launched in Kampala, Uganda on Thursday shows that Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Rwanda and Burundi still run their trades as separate and distinct markets, keeping their economies small and disconnected due to several bottlenecks in the regulations. This was blamed on failure by individual states to lift legal barriers like recognition of business certificates from each other and double taxation.

In recent times, the trade and investment potential of sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) has been well-documented with many investors from emerging markets now tapping into the opportunity. But many Western investors are still undecided about its growth and return on investment prospects. Factors that influence investor’s decision regarding market attractiveness, particularly for the manufacturing and consumer sectors, include market size and market integration network for scale economies. Investors would most likely be interested in an integrated regional market that can be leveraged to link global supply chains.

Wednesday, 02 November 2016

Poor harvests, hunger and rising food prices: climate change threatens food production around the world. The solution to all of this could be free trade, researcher Hermann Lotze-Campen told EurActiv Germany. Hermann Lotze-Campen is chair of the department for Climate Impacts and Vulnerabilities at the Postdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) and is the co-author of a new study on the influence of climate change on economic losses in agriculture. A new PIK study, which you co-authored, says that even a small increase in average temperature may have consequences on regional crops.

Wednesday, 12 October 2016

African countries, such as Namibia, have demonstrated just how the implementation of the TIR (International Road Transport) Convention can boost intra-trade. TIR is the world’s only universal customs transit system and one of the most successful international transport conventions. The International Road Transport Organisation (IRU) says its recently published study, ‘Transit costs in East and Southern Africa’, has “clearly demonstrated how African countries implementing the TIR Convention can reduce the costs of trade in southern and eastern Africa by hundreds of dollars per container, thus saving billions of dollars and increasing GDP in African countries”.

Monday, 10 October 2016

The revision of rules of origin for products manufactured within the East African Community (EAC) have encouraged investment and boosted manufacturing sector within the region, the business community and officials have said. In Article 1 of General Agreement on Tariff and Trade, rules of origin are defined as laws, regulations and administrative determinations of general application applied by any member to determine the country of origin of goods leading to the granting of tariff preferences. Different stakeholders were speaking during the 7th session between the Ministry of East African Community and the Rwandan private sector, last week.

Monday, 03 October 2016

The next Brussels Development Briefing n.46 on the subject of “Agribusiness development in SIDs: the potential of tourism-related markets” will be held in Brussels at 09:00-13:00 on 21st September 2016 at the ACP Secretariat (Avenue Georges Henri 451, 1200 Brussels). This Briefing will be organised by the ACP-EU Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation (CTA), in collaboration with the European Commission / DEVCO, CONCORD and the ACP Secretariat.

Thursday, 15 September 2016

A trade spat between Fiji and Papua New Guinea has reportedly ended. The spat was over Fiji's refusal to allow PNG food products to enter the country. Fiji TV reports that it has confirmed that the Government and Biosecurity Authority would soon allow PNG products such as corned beef, rice and biscuits to be imported. The Fiji authorities had reportedly met with the manufacturers of corned beef products, and rice and other food companies. Fiji's trade minister, Faiyaz Koya, said he was happy with the progress.

It’s the scariest thing to face the Caribbean since Johnny Depp’s eyeliner in “Pirates of the Caribbean.” The area known for coconuts is battling a serious shortage of its signature crop. Sorry, coconut milk and water lovers. The serious shortage comes following a multipronged attack of storms, droughts, bugs and the creepy-sounding Lethal Yellowing, a disease that kills palm trees. Result: Caribbean plantations have already shrunk up to 17% since 1994, according to the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization.

Wednesday, 14 September 2016

The next Brussels Development Briefing n.46 on the subject of “Agribusiness development in SIDs: the potential of tourism-related markets” will be held in Brussels at 09:00-13:00 on 21st September 2016 at the ACP Secretariat (Avenue Georges Henri 451, 1200 Brussels). This Briefing will be organised by the ACP-EU Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation (CTA), in collaboration with the European Commission / DEVCO, CONCORD and the ACP Secretariat.

Thursday, 08 September 2016

Pacific island states and countries failed on Friday to strike a deal to protect shrinking supplies of tuna and adopt cutbacks following a regional conference, officials said, sparking condemnation from conservationists. The Pacific Ocean is the world’s largest tuna fishing ground, accounting for almost 60% of the global catch. But supplies are dwindling and conservationists say urgent action is needed to ensure populations remain viable.