Video guest: Josephine Mwangi

December 2017
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EDITO
Thursday, 14 December 2017

Of all the fisheries partnership agreements currently in force, the EU-Mauritania agreement is by far the most significant in economic terms. A new protocol, setting the details for implementation of the agreement over the coming four years, was signed and entered into provisional application in November 2015. Parliament's consent is now required for the conclusion of this protocol. The first fisheries agreement with Mauritania was concluded in 1987, as a continuation of the pre-accession arrangements of Spain and Portugal with Mauritania. It was reshaped into a cooperation agreement in 1996. In 2006, it became a fisheries partnership agreement (FPA), renewable for six-year periods, with the current period covering 2012-2018. Unlike most current FPAs, which focus on tuna, the EU-Mauritania FPA is one of the few mixed agreements providing access to a wide range of stocks. For EU vessels to be allowed to fish within the framework of the FPA, a protocol is required in order to define the fishing opportunities for EU vessels in Mauritanian waters and the financial contribution to be paid by the EU. Following the expiry of the previous, rather controversial, protocol in December 2014, a new protocol was signed and entered into provisional application on 16 November 2015.

Source: europarl.europa.eu

Tuesday, 03 May 2016

Commission’s decisions are based on the EU's 'IUU Regulation', which entered into force in 2010. This key instrument in the fight against illegal fishing ensures that only fisheries products that have been certified as legal can access the EU market. Since November 2012 the Commission has been in formal dialogue with several third countries (pre-identification or "yellow card"), which have been warned of the need to take strong action to fight IUU fishing. In case of significant progress, the Commission can end the dialogue (lifting the pre-identification status or "green card").

Wednesday, 27 April 2016

Trinidad and Tobago is at risk of being sanctioned by the European Union (EU) for being uncooperative in the fight against illegal fishing, and has been given six months to address the problems. Failure to do so could see fisheries products from the country banned from entering the EU. The twin-island republic was among three countries warned yesterday by the European Commission – the others being Kiribati and Sierra Leone – and given “yellow cards”, which indicate they will be listed as uncooperative in the fight against illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing if certain steps are not taken.

Fish are not only tasty and nutritious, but also increasingly at risk. Overfishing is causing fish stocks to drop around the world. The EU aims to promote sustainable fishing in Europe as part of its common fisheries policy. This week Parliament's fisheries committee votes on important agreements with Liberia and Mauritania and looks at how to improve the situation in the Mediterranean. Overfishing continues to pose a threat to fish stocks throughout the world. In Europe the situation in the Mediterranean is proving problematic.

Tuesday, 26 April 2016

In December 2015 the European Commission proposed a revised system for issuing and managing fishing authorisations, intended to improve monitoring and transparency of the EU external fishing fleet. The proposal, replacing the current 'Fishing Authorisations Regulation' 1006/2008, would apply to all EU vessels fishing outside EU waters, and to third-country vessels fishing in EU waters. The current scope of the authorisation system would be extended to include practices which have been poorly monitored so far, such as private agreements between EU companies and third countries and abusive reflagging operations.

Monday, 18 April 2016

The Cook Islands prime minister, Henry Puna, has rejected opposition claims that a deal with the European Union on fishing access is illegal. The opposition had contended that the secretary of marine resources, Ben Ponia, by initialling the plan, had acted illegally. The US$6.5 million dollar deal would grant access to four EU purse seiners to catch up to 7,000 tonnes of tuna a year in the Cooks' Exclusive Economic Zone. Mr Puna, who is also fisheries minister, said all Mr Ponia has done is initial a draft agreement for discussion and negotiation purposes.

Wednesday, 13 April 2016

The Cook Islands opposition says a purse seine fishing agreement with the European Union is invalid because it's been signed off incorrectly. However a government spokesperson, Edwin Pittman, says the government is yet to complete the Sustainable Fisheries Partnership Agreement. But the opposition leader, Teina Bishop, insists it has been approved by cabinet and merely needs to be rubber stamped by prime minister Henry Puna. He says the document was initialled by the Marine Resources secretary for the EU to endorse, but under the 2005 Marine Resources Act, only the minister, who happens to be Henry Puna, can do that.

Monday, 11 April 2016

The Cook Islands cabinet has given its support to the Prime Minister to proceed with a fisheries agreement with the European Union. The prime minister Henry Puna said the Pacific was pursuing the best course for the future of the region's fisheries, and the Sustainable Fisheries Partnership Agreement illustrated how the Cook Islands was cooperating at the broader international level. Mr Puna said the main element of the agreement, worth 6.5 million US dollars, was access for four EU purse seiners to Cook Islands' waters to fish up to 7,000 tonnes of tuna a year.

Wednesday, 23 March 2016

Front-line officials who are responsible for monitoring and control tasks of Pacific fishing will be presented with findings of a major quantifying illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fisheries report two years in the making. The presentation will take place in the framework of monitoring, control and supervision (MCS) meetings these officials will attend in Auckland this month.“This is the first time that the Pacific countries, through The Pacific Islands Forum Fisheries Agency (FFA) have been in a position to determine the type and scope of such a review. As such it will help clear the air on previous claims made, and the sensational figures that are often quoted,” FFA Director-General James Movick.

Tuesday, 15 March 2016

The World Bank Country Manager for Sierra Leone, Parminder Brar, yesterday in a press briefing raised serious concern over the present Condition of the Joint Monitoring Centre that was set up to monitor illegal fishing along the coast of Sierra Leone. It could be recalled that the World Bank started work in developing the West African Regional Fisheries Programme as a way of preventing the problem of rampant illegal fishing by Asiatic and European fishing vessels that took over from the previous industrial fisheries by factory vessels from Russia.