Video guest: Josephine Mwangi

November 2017
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EDITO
Sunday, 19 November 2017

Seychelles is all set to become the first country in the world to implement a comprehensive spatial plan for its entire ocean territory. The Indian Ocean archipelago of 115 islands, scattered through almost 1.4 million square kilometres of resource-rich waters, is in the process of finalising a marine spatial plan that will create one of the largest marine reserves in the region. Currently, only around one percent of the Seychelles' waters are protected as marine national parks. This percentage is expected to increase to between 10 and 15%.The plan also includes the protection of sustainable artisanal fisheries and create specific zones for exploitative activities, such a commercial tuna fishing and oil exploration and exploitation.

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The Local Enterprise and Value Chain Enhancement (LEVE) modernizationProject co-financed to the tune of $ 250,000 the Caribbean Harvest to enablethem to double their production of tilapia, from 1.2 to 2.4 tonnes. 300 cagesfor fry will be provided to 150 farmers who live on Lake Azueï to allow them tobreed fingerlings to market size. This co-financing will also be used toincrease the capacity of solar equipment to 60 kilowatts to the Farm HarvestCaribbean "The LEVE co-financing will enable more farmers to producetilapia, providing them and also to their families, improved livelihoods,"stressed Dr. Valentin Abe, CEO of Caribbean Harvest.

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Thursday, 05 March 2015

 

In the ongoing battle against obesity, heart disease and diabetes in the Pacific region, a new study has revealed that allocating sufficient tuna for local consumption and keeping it affordable could significantly improve health outcomes.

Pacific Island communities have the highest rates of obesity and diabetes in the world, primarily because traditional foods such as root crops, fish and shellfish are being replaced by relatively cheap, energy-dense and nutritionally-poor imported foods.

Increased consumption of fish and shellfish, which are rich in protein, essential fatty acids, vitamins and minerals, is seen as an important part of the solution.

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The Caribbean Regional Fisheries Mechanism (CRFM) is holding its first regional meeting for 2015 in St. Vincent and the Grenadines. The 24th Meeting of the Executive Committee of the Caribbean Fisheries Forum, one of its advisory arms, is chaired by Dominica and Grenada currently sits as the vice chair. The other countries represented on the 6-member Committee are Jamaica, Guyana, Montserrat and Barbados (the immediate past chair).The inter-sessional meetings are held twice a year between sittings of the Caribbean Fisheries Forum, which has representation from all CRFM States. The issue of illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing and the implementation for the Caribbean Community Common Fisheries Policy (CCCFP) are on the agenda.

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Friday, 27 February 2015

The Council of the EU approved the political agreement between institutions on the implementation of the landing obligation for fisheries. Also known as the "omnibus regulation", the text is in-line with the central objective of the reformed Common Fisheries Policy (CFP): the progressive elimination of discards in all EU fisheries through the introduction of an obligation to land all catches. The final text will be on the agenda of the European Parliament and the Council for its adoption. The  landing obligation aims to curb wasteful practice of discarding unwanted catch and promote smarter fishing methods which reduce unwanted catch in the first place.

Thursday, 26 February 2015

A delegation from Angola and representatives of the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) shall discuss a continental fisheries and communal aquaculture project in Rome. They delegation shall negotiate forms of financing the US$11 million of the project’s budget with IFAD. The project, which aims to introduce inland fishing and aquaculture into the communal food supply chain, will be focused on three areas, namely infrastructure, training and cooperatives. Meanwhile, Angola and Russia will increase cooperation in the fields of fisheries, particularly aquaculture, and education (management training), by signing two new cooperation agreements.

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Tuesday, 24 February 2015

Vanuatu's fisheries minister is calling on Pacific countries to make more effort to end illegal fishing in the region. David Tosul said that the Pacific's struggle with IUU fishing is what has prompted more so called 'yellow cards' from the European Union. He says Vanuatu got such a card in 2012 which had threatened its export access to the EU. While Vanuatu has since improved its performance, other countries have now been admonished by the EU - including Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands and Tuvalu. There are concerns that countries like PNG, Fiji and other island countries in the region  will not be able to export their product to big markets.

The regional maritime information centre (RMIC) is a European Union-funded project, initiated by the Indian Ocean Commission (IOC). At the  African Union (AU) maritime security meeting in Seychelles, it was decided that it will be located in Madagascar, it was decided at last week's. The centre shall ensure the safety and security of 7,000-8,000 ships sailing between Africa and Southeast Asia, and specifically along the Mozambique Channel between Madagascar and the east African mainland.Under the €37.5 million (USD42.7 million) EU-funded MASE maritime security programme, IOC is also improving maritime surveillance capability and co-ordination in the region.

The European Union provides technical advice and assistance via the Deep Sea Minerals project, in collaboration SPC to enable Pacific Island countries to make informed decisions about deep seabed mining. Tuvalu and Kiribati are the most recent members of the group to join the group who are proactively formulating rules for seabed. SPC geoscience division director Mike Petterson: "SPC will continue to work with the countries to develop the legal instruments required and assist with capacity building and awareness raising programmes in this fascinating, emerging area."

Monday, 23 February 2015

A Taiwanese fishing vessels has been found to be conducting illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing in the waters of the Marshall Islands in the Pacific. The crew has been arrested and the fine could amount to $6.5m.