Video guest: Josephine Mwangi

October 2017
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EDITO
Friday, 20 October 2017

The ACP Parliamentary Assembly adopted a resolution on the Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs) between ACP regions and the European Union, reiterating its call for more flexibility on the EU side in negotiating contentious issues with the three remaining regions which have yet to sign a comprehensive EPA with the EU. The Eastern and Southern Africa (ESA), Central Africa and the Pacific regions have not signed, although some countries have individually agreed to interim agreements while awaiting the conclusion of the full regional EPAs. Pacific ACP countries have further asserted that, in its current form, the interim EPA (already signed by the larger economies in the region, namely Papua New Guinea and Fiji) is not suitable for most Pacific States due to the fact that as Smaller Island States they do not have the capacity to derive benefits from it.

Wednesday, 24 June 2015

Delegates of the African, Caribbean, and Pacific Group visited Golden Ocean Fish Ltd factory in Suva giving them a chance to witness the processes that are undertaken to make fish compliant for export. In 2012 it was discovered that Fiji did not have in place the relevant legal and policy framework to appropriately contribute to combating Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) Fishing. Permanent Secretary for Fisheries and Forests Inoke Wainiqolo says Fiji was warned with a yellow card and directed to comply with the European Union’s IUU regulations or we’d lose our market access. “Fiji has two areas that we need to improve on which are our legislation as well as the number of people that are required to monitor the operations in the sea and well as our processes.” After years of working hard, Fiji managed to comply with the EU standards last year and has been sharing its experience with other countries.

Tuesday, 23 June 2015

The 3397th Council meeting Agriculture and Fisheries held in Luxembourg on 16 June 2015 adopted a decision to authorise the Commission to open negotiations on behalf of the EU for the conclusion of a sustainable fisheries partnership agreement (FPA) and protocol with the United Republic of Tanzania.The new agreement between the EU and Tanzania should be in line with the Council conclusions of 19 March 2012 on the Commission communication of 13 July 2011 on the external dimension of the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) as well as Regulation No 1380/2013 on the CFP1.

The 3397th Council meeting Agriculture and Fisheries held in Luxembourg on 16 June 2015 adopted a decision to authorise the Commission to open negotiations on behalf of the EU for the conclusion of a sustainable fisheries partnership agreement (FPA) and protocol with the United Republic of Tanzania.The new agreement between the EU and Tanzania should be in line with the Council conclusions of 19 March 2012 on the Commission communication of 13 July 2011 on the external dimension of the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) as well as Regulation No 1380/2013 on the CFP1.

At the 3397th Council meeting Agriculture and Fisheries held in Luxembourg on 16 June 2015, Ministers were briefed on a Commission communication on fishing opportunities for 2016. Several member states acknowledged the overall improvement in the state of fish resources and recalled the importance to set up multiannual plans with a multispecies approach for fish stocks. Delegations also underlined the consequences of the new common fisheries policy (CFP) for fishing opportunities in 2016, and notably the landing obligation which will be extended next year to demersal fisheries in the North Sea and in the Atlantic EU waters.

Thursday, 18 June 2015

The government of Liberia and the European Union have signed a new Sustainable Fisheries Partnership Agreement as well as an associated Protocol of a 5 year duration. The Protocol allows access to 28 EU purse seiners and 6 long-line vessels, based on a reference tonnage of 6 500 tonnes, for tuna and other migratory fish species. The EU will pay Liberia an average annual compensation of € 650 000 (or approx. 730.00 USD), out of which 50% is earmarked to support the fisheries policy of Liberia. The Protocol also aims to (i) reinforce cooperation between Liberia and the EU, especially in their fight against illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing; (ii) provide sectoral support to help Liberia reinforce its fisheries monitoring, control and surveillance capacity; (iii) to enhance scientific cooperation and promote the development of the fishing sector of Liberia.

The European Parliament is in the stage of drafting a proposal for a decision on the Council decision on the conclusion of the Protocol setting out the fisheries opportunities and financial contribution provided for in the Fisheries Partnership Agreement between the EC and the Republic of Guinea Bissau. So far, there is no consensus on the draft opinion. Nirj Deva MEP, member of the Committee on Development even calls on the Committee on Fisheries, as the committee responsible, to recommend that Parliament decline to give its consent to the Fisheries Partnership Agreement.

 

In the blog of the E15 initiative, Milton Naughton, Executive Director of the Caribbean Regional Fisheries Mechanism (CRFM) explains why illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing remains high on the international agenda, but also the disproportionate effects it has for Small Island Developing States (SIDS). In relation to the EU’s IUU activities Naughton notes, ‘the EU seems not to be going after its own member states and nationals who are engaged in IUU fishing with the same intensity, as it does against third states that compete with its fleet on the high seas.’ The blog warns of the heightened competitive risks that may arise and disproportionately affect small-scale operators. It also recognizes that unilateral measures are not always effective in tackling IUU.

Wednesday, 17 June 2015

The European Parliament Committee on Fisheries shall have a public hearing on eco-labeling of fisheries products on 16th June. Eco-labeling schemes was first addressed in the Commission Communication on the Future for the Market on Fisheries Products in the EU in 1997, and has gained momentum since the introduction of the reformed Common Fisheries Policy in 2002. Additionally, international momentum has also been created with the adoption of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) guidelines on "eco-labeling for fish and fisheries products from marine fisheries." It has been recognized however, that the recent increase in the number of eco-labeled products creates difficulties in terms of competition, trade and consumer protection policies and has put the issue back on the agenda.

Wednesday, 10 June 2015

The European Union has approved 190 million in funds for fisheries projects in Angola, to be disbursed up until 2020. This commitment is consistent with the policies and commitments made by Angola in the area of the Millennium Development Goals. The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) has also announced support for cooperation agreements in the 2013/2017 period targeting aquaculture, fishing conservation and sale projects. Chief economist of the African Development Bank (AfDB) in Angola Mamadou Diallo said the results achieved to date had encouraged the FAO to increase support for another ten projects funded for the 2016/2017 period by providing US$11 million.