Video guest: Josephine Mwangi

June 2017
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Monday, 26 June 2017

The European Commission has granted Cabo Verde (Cape Verde) a temporary waiver on the rules of preferential origin for prepared or preserved fillets of mackerel, bonito and albacore according to the implementing regulation published in the European Union’s Official Bulletin. The waiver will last for a year (June 2017 to June 2018) for bonito and albacore and two years for mackerel, with retroactive effect from 1 January 2017. Cabo Verde benefits from the Union’s generalised system of preferences for the rules of origin. The waiver covers annual amounts of 2,500 tonnes of prepared and preserved mackerel or mackerel fillets and 875 tonnes of processed or preserved bonito and albacore.

Wednesday, 14 June 2017

The Pacific Fishery Management Council has recommended regulations governing the use of electronic equipment to monitor at-sea discards of target, non-target and prohibited fish for certain West Coast groundfish fisheries. If approved by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), this will mark the culmination of a four-year process to develop and implement regulations for electronic monitoring system use in West Coast groundfish fisheries. Council Member Dorothy Lowman said, “For many fishing operations, electronic monitoring will provide a more cost-effective way to meet 100 percent monitoring requirements. This will allow fishermen the flexibility to choose the monitoring method that makes the most sense for them while maintaining full accountability.”

Australia works closely with our regional neighbours to continually strengthen global management of some of the world’s largest tuna fisheries located in the Pacific Ocean. One of the most important sources of data available to monitor fishing activity is the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) satellite based electronic Vessel Monitoring System (VMS). Vessels from all twenty-seven member countries, nine participating territories, and seven cooperating non-member countries fishing for tuna in the Pacific Ocean on the high seas, must report to the WCPFC via a VMS unit which provides information on vessel position, course, and speed 24-hours-a-day 365-days-a-year for the purposes of compliance, fisheries management, and research.

Tuesday, 16 May 2017

Alan Deidun, director of the International Ocean Institute Malta Training Centre was invited by the IOI, the UN Conference on Trade and Development, the Polytechnic University of Hong Kong and by the Schenzhen World Health Foundation to attend the ‘Healthy Oceans, Healthy Coasts’ International Leadership Seminar held in Hong Kong. The major scope of the seminar was to contribute in tangible means to the drafting of a position paper on how best to achieve the ambitious targets of Sustainable Development Goal 14 to be eventually presented at the UN’s The Ocean Conference to be held in New York in June The meeting was opened by IOI managing director Antonella Vassallo.

Wednesday, 10 May 2017

Operationalizing the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS) Customs Union, which will result in the removal of barriers to free trade in the region, is being strengthened through a series of regional capacity building consultations being undertaken by the OECS Commission. These sessions will provide a clearer understanding of the new era in domestic, regional and international trade for the seven OECS Protocol Member States, which would include the removal of import formalities on goods traded within the Customs Union and the harmonization of border and regulatory procedures with respect to goods imported from countries outside of the region. To date, the Commission has held consultations in St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Dominica, Montserrat and St. Kitts and Nevis on the work undertaken to establish the Customs Union and Free Circulation of Goods.

Monday, 08 May 2017

The EU currently has nine Outermost Regions (ORs), which are an integral part of its territory: the Canary Islands (Spain), the Azores and Madeira (Portugal), and Guadeloupe, French Guiana, Ma rtinique, Saint Martin, Réunion and Mayotte (France). While t he rights and obligations of the EU Treati es apply fully to these regions, Article 349 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) recognises that the y have particular features which constrain their development, and allows the adoption of specific measures adapted to the situation of the ORs. Under the current common fisheries policy (CFP) , OR fishing fleets are subject to the same management measures as all EU fleets . A s the CFP sets maximum limits of total tonnage and engine power, the capacity of the OR fleets cannot increase (though Mayotte, which became an OR more recently, benefits from a derogation) OR fleets ' capacity limits are set for each fleet segment of each OR.

Wednesday, 26 April 2017

Delegates from Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania have decried what they called political interference in the management of water resources. During the recent Lake Victoria Fisheries Organization (LVFO) conference in Kampala, which was funded by the European Union [EU] and SmartFish Programme, the delegates said such interferences have increased cases of illegal activities on the lake that is shared by the three East African countries. "Our lake is not in good shape, yet there has been constant intervention. The problem has been made worse by political interference; we need to build resilience that resists this interference in order to have a sustainable Lake Victoria," Susan Amendi, a delegate from Kenya, said.

Tuesday, 18 April 2017

Maritime security challenges have received increasing attention in Europe in recent years. In 2014, the Council of the European Union adopted the first EU Maritime Security Strategy which includes a comprehensive definition of maritime security from a European standpoint. The EU understands it “as a state of affairs of the global maritime domain, in which international law and national law are enforced, freedom of navigation is guaranteed and citizens, infrastructure, transport, the environment and marine resources are protected.” In short, maritime security comprises much more than the traditional questions related to seapower and naval strategies.

Wednesday, 12 April 2017

Professor Alastair Sutton, a former European adviser to the Crown Dependencies, recently warned the House of Lords of a EU “blacklisting” of the Crown Dependencies’ financial sectors as part of a drive to deal with tax havens.He told the committee the EU was undertaking a “so-called blacklisting process where serious damage to the economies of Jersey, Guernsey, the Isle of Man… could be done if the EU blacklist these territories despite the fact that they have ticked all the boxes internationally in the OECD for compliance with tax, anti-money laundering legislation and financial regulation”.

Monday, 03 April 2017

Experts have highlighted the importance “coherent global actions” to ensure the sustainability of the world’s fish stocks – a valuable export commodity for more than 60 ACP countries. Fisheries is particularly significant to the ACP’s 37 member states that are classified as Small Island Developing States (SIDS) as well as coastal economies.

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