Video guest: Josephine Mwangi

October 2017
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EDITO
Monday, 23 October 2017
Experts from African, Caribbean and Pacific countries who met last Wednesday in Luanda to prepare for the 18th session of the Joint Parliamentary Assembly are calling on the member states of the European Union and other rich countries to write off poor nations’ foreign debts. This standpoint was expressed in a statement read out to the press by the spokesperson at the meeting, Robert Luke Ironga, stressing that almost 60 countries need debt cancellation to have a chance of achieving the Millennium Development Goals. Robert Luke Ironga reported that the meeting had saluted measures already taken by some EU states to cancel developing countries’ debts. The document contains a draft motion for a resolution calling on donor countries to take account of the effects of the economic crisis on the ACP states and apply the principles enshrined in the Paris Declaration on aid efficiency, reiterated in the Accra Agenda, and expressed at the Doha Conference and several G20 summits.
The fourth AFD-IFOP poll on the French population’s attitude to development aid has revealed that French people consider their country’s public development aid spending to be justified. Six out of ten believe that France plays an important role in fighting poverty in the international arena and should continue to develop its own aid policy within a European framework (76%). This view applies both to bilateral and multilateral aid (Unitaid, the global fund to fight AIDS and tuberculosis, the European development fund, etc.). Although the majority of French people believe the aid to be effective, they also think efficiency could be further improved through supporting local partners and promoting knowledge transfer. 66% of respondents said France’s aid for developing countries was justified in spite of the crisis and the country’s budgetary problems. A large majority of those questioned (57%) were aware of the importance of aid in tackling the international crisis and believed the development budget should be maintained or increased. 71% said the EU should increase its aid.
Tuesday, 01 December 2009
As global fish stocks continue to plunge, fish farming is seen as a way of contributing to food security. The EU has pledged to increase the competitiveness of European aquafarming to meet a growing appetite for seafood, but policymakers stress that this must go hand-in-hand with farming to restore fish stocks. The UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) estimates that over 70% of the world's fish species are already either fully exploited or depleted. And while the impact of global overfishing is typically measured in environmental and economic terms, depleted fish stocks also threaten the food security of millions of people who are dependent on fish for food.
At a time when European leaders are gathering to welcome the dawn of a new era with the coming into force of the Lisbon Treaty, this change may well prove to be more extensive than anticipated. The coming days could spell the end of the era when Europe considered the fight against poverty a priority. In the ongoing discussions on the Banana Dossier, the ACP States have made numerous concessions in an effort towards finding a definitive and balanced solution. In fact, analysis of the European banana market has shown that the customs tariff of €176/t that has been applied to banana imports from Central and South American countries (MFN countries) since January 2006, has sharply increased their presence on the EU market. There is no risk whatsoever, not now nor in the future, given the limited production capacity of the ACP countries that the European market will be “flooded” with ACP bananas.
Monday, 30 November 2009

Mr. Hegel Goutier, editor of the magazine "The Courier - The Magazine of Africa-Caribbean-Pacific & European Union Relations" is our guest. Mr. Goutier, who has 22 years experience as a journalist specializing in ACP-EU cooperation, present the purpose, content and objectives of the Courrier (available in French, English, Spanish and Portuguese), real media tool between the EU and ACP countries. Mr. Goutier shares with us the challenges ahead for the Courier and for the ACP-EU communication.

Friday, 27 November 2009
CTA in partnership with the European Commission-DG Development and EuropeAid, the EU Presidency, the ACP Secretariat, Euforic, IPS Europe and Concord organizes bimonthly Development Briefings in Brussels to raise awareness on key rural development issues with the development community based in Brussels. The next Brussels Development Briefing will be held on 9th December  and will discuss "From Global Food Crisis to Local Food Insecurity" in the context of the new EC policy on Food security to be released. The Briefing will be looking at the domino effects of increased speculation in food markets (How has the global food and financial crisis affected food production and distribution and the food security of the poorest? Is global food production at risk in the medium and long term and will national food security and food sovereignty be the priority over global food availability?  Is the small-scale farming more effective and resilient in times of crisis in least-developed countries?) and the on what realistic policy options can secure food supply and availability at global and local levels. The meeting will be held on 9th December at Berlaymont from 8h30 to 13h00. You can view outcomes of previous meetings at http://brusselsbriefings.net. For registration please contact: boto@cta.int or pruna@cta.int
The European Commission has a launched a consultation on an issues paper entitled "Towards a EU policy framework to assist developing countries addressing agriculture and food security challenges". This consultation aims at collecting views on a number of important challenges and issues in the field of agriculture and food security in order to identify the role of the EU in assisting developing countries addressing such challenges. In this context, the CTA and its partners will organise the next Briefing on 9th December on Food security as to feed the debates.
Experts from Africa, Caribbean and Pacific are meeting since  Wednesday morning in Luanda, to prepare the documents that will be submitted to the 18th  session of the Joint Parliamentary Assembly, that will open on November 30 in the Angolan capital. The meeting is to tackle matters related to the impact of the world economic financial crisis on ACP countries, the situation in Madagascar, climatic changes, as well as the participation and  integration of youngsters in social and cultural affairs. The event will gather 400 participants from the Africa, Caribbean and Pacific plus Europe, to  discuss the reforms in international institutions and globalisation, including the refugees issue. The meeting will also tackle the impact of the world economic and financial crisis on the  ACP-EU states, the reduction of the effect of natural disasters, the World Trade Organisation  negotiations and the economic partnership accords, as well as the documents on regional and  countries strategies on the 10th Europe Development Fund.
Thursday, 26 November 2009
Liberalising global agricultural trade without any regulation would threaten global food security as private investment funds would buy huge amounts of land in developing countries and produce for profit rather than to feed the poor, Jacques Carles, founder of Momagri, a French think-tank on agriculture. If you free international trade without any regulation, only international investment funds and speculators will profit, not the poor", said Carles, managing director of Momagri (Mouvement pour une organisation mondiale de l'agriculture). Private investment funds are already rushing to buy agricultural land all over the globe, he warned, adding that "we are heading towards a very dangerous scenario" in which these funds and speculators own huge amounts of land and produce according to world demand in order to make a profit.
Over the years, the European Community has developed strong political and economic relationship with countries from ACP regions, known collectively as the ACP Group, notably through the signing of the Cotonou Agreement in 2000. Fisheries is one of the economic sectors that has received continuous support from the EC through the European Development Fund, both at regional and national levels. Considering the economic and social importance of fisheries in many ACP countries, EU-funded projects designed to develop fisheries administrations’ planning and management capacities have been implemented in partnership with concerned ACP States with a view to enhance food security and create employment. ACP FISH II is a Programme financed by the European Commission under the 9th European Development Fund, with an overall amount of 30-million Euros, aiming at strengthening fisheries management in ACP countries.