Video guest: Josephine Mwangi

May 2018
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Friday, 25 May 2018

The South African Sugar Association (SASA) is aiming to conquer the UK market to adapt to the end of EU sugar quotas, which came into force on 1 October last year. The reform has made the EU less attractive for raw sugar exports from the rainbow nation, one of the cheapest producers in the world.

As part of its mission to raise quality standards of fish in our country, the Ministry of Fisheries, Aquaculture and Maritime Economy, through the National Bureau for Sanitary Control of Fishery Products (ONSPA), this week handed over two ice-making factories and a cold storage facility to the Jasmin Trading House company, the only fish factory satisfying the required health standards during a recent visit by EU experts, with the aim of strengthening the company.

Monday, 14 May 2018

European Commission-funded, FAO-led partnership will help African, Caribbean and Pacific countries shift from wildmeat to alternative sources of animal protein. A €45 million multi-partner programme launched on Tuesday 10 October at FAO seeks to help African, Caribbean and Pacific countries halt unsustainable wildlife hunting, conserve their natural heritage and strengthen people's livelihoods and food security. Funded by the European Commission, the seven-year programme is an initiative of the African Caribbean and Pacific Group of States (ACP).

Tuesday, 10 October 2017

Europe will remain an important supplier of agricultural goods in the future but the greatest untapped potential lies in Africa, which could become the “bread basket” for the rest of the world, the president of Yara, a multinational fertiliser and crop nutrition company, told EURACTIV. Svein Tore Holsether also said digital technologies like precision farming were the best way to boost agricultural production. “While we still see the potential for increasing productivity and sustainability of European agriculture, the greatest potential we see is in Africa,” Holsether pointed out. “Today €29.6bn ($35bn) is spent every year on importing food, while there is a great untapped potential for higher productivity as the continent holds 65% of the world’s arable land,” the fertiliser company boss said.

Friday, 08 September 2017

The Federal Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development and Nigerian Export Promotion Council (NEPC) have commenced quality guideline training of bee farmers across the country. Dr Gideon Mshelbwala, the Director, Veterinary and Pest Control Services in the ministry, made the statement on Thursday in Goshen, Nasarawa State.He said the training was aimed at enabling Nigeria meet European Union requirements for export of honey. He added that the training would also help to build the capacity of bee farmers on modern bee keeping practices for them to comply with international standards in honey production.

Tuesday, 25 July 2017

Fruit producers and exporters from Cameroon, the Ivory Coast and Ghana have officially launched AFRUIBANA, an association that will allow fruit producers on the continent to combine their efforts with a view to having their voices heard better in international trade. During a visit to Brussels, Cameroon Trade Minister, Luc Magloire Mbarga Atangana, launched the association to European institutions on Wednesday, July 19. As representative of the African, Caribbean and Pacific Group of States (ACP) during the various Councils of Ministers addressing the banana industry, the minister was lauded for this initiative, which is on a mission to defend the interests of African fruit farming.

Monday, 24 July 2017

The further you travel from Brussels, the likelier people are to see Brexit as an opportunity. I’m in Kampala, discussing post-EU commercial prospects with business and political leaders from across East Africa. While not everyone here started as a Leaver, there is now a widespread hope that Brexit will lead to more open trade arrangements, above all in farming, which employs two thirds of Africa’s workforce. The EU’s Common Agricultural Policy treats Africa as an economic colony. Brussels applies tariffs to tomato sauce, but not to tomatoes; to chocolate, but not to cocoa beans; to roasted coffee, but not to green coffee.

Tuesday, 18 July 2017

For a developing country exporter, for example, of fresh bananas from the Philippines seeking market access to the EU, it is necessary to comply with at least seven categories of sustainability standards, from food safety controls to labelling standards, with each category of compliance carrying with it a range of production guidelines and documentation – a somewhat daunting prospect for a semi-literate farming producer in rural Mindanao. As such, one of the major contemporary challenges facing developing country firms, and especially small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) today, is the ever-increasing number of regulations and sustainability standards they are required to conform to if they are to integrate into global value chains (GVCs).

Thursday, 13 July 2017

Grenada’s Prime Minister Dr. Keith Mitchell and chief executive officer of the CARICOM Development Fund (CDF) Rodinald Soomer have signed a grant agreement aimed at enhancing export capacity and value-added in the island’s spices sector. The immediate beneficiary company, West India Spices, has been awarded a grant of US$244,000. The grant, according to Soomer, will help to increase drying and grinding capacity based on the use of renewable power sources that will facilitate all weather production of value-added nutmeg-based products for export. “It is expected that the project will have the impact of increasing West India Spices’ purchases of raw inputs for producing essential oils on average by 10 percent per year until 2025,” Sommer said at the signing ceremony.

The costs of ingredients of poultry feed highly depend on the country’s production. As a result these costs highly determine the competitive power of the national poultry chains in East Africa. This is concluded in a study conducted by WLR in collaboration with the Netherlands Africa Business Council (NABC). The study shows how poultry chains in Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda and Tanzania increasingly depend on developments in their neighbouring countries. The results of the project ‘Poultry Development in Africa, a regional perspective’ have been presented in the Africa Event of the Dutch Poultry Centre. Feed prices are lowest in the countries that are able to locally produce the main feed ingredients (mainly maize).

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