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Environment

Video guest: Josephine Mwangi

November 2018
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EDITO
Tuesday, 13 November 2018
A new International Fairtrade Towns website has been launched on July 14 by the Fairtrade Foundation with partners across Europe. The new website is aimed at connecting nearly 700 Fairtrade towns in 18 countries, by combining information about the history of Fairtrade Towns internationally, a Google map, the latest news and events, as well as downloadable resources and tools. An interactive social networking section is to be present, where campaigners can share ideas through forums and discussion groups. It's currently available in eight languages and is part of a three-year European Union funded Fairtrade Towns in Europe project launched in 2007.
Wednesday, 16 September 2009
Despite the efforts made in recent years by the European Union, to alleviate the suffering of animals sent to slaughter, the problem still exists. Each year, more than 360 million pigs, sheep and calves, 330 million chickens and 25 million fur-bearing animals are slaughtered in the European Union and almost each European country still has its own excessively cruel slaughtering rules. In addition, many animals simply die during their transportation to the slaughterhouses, according to European analysts. Amid the tightening of national legislations, regulating slaughtering, many European farmers prefer to export their live cattle to other countries where the slaughter is performed by methods that are banned in their own countries. Many experts have hopes for the new European regulations in the area of slaughtering, which has already been developed by some European experts in the middle of last year.
In September 2008, the European Commission’s Communication on ‘A European Strategy for Marine and Maritime Research’ took this a stage further by laying out an action plan for better integration of research between the maritime and marine communities in order to address the problems of marine degradation caused by human activities and develop new technologies for sustainable development of maritime activities. This brochure is based on that communication and explains the context behind its creation and some of the proposed actions and initiatives that will be carried outin the coming years.
Tuesday, 15 September 2009
There are no important advantages in terms of health and nutritional benefits gained from eating organic food when compared to food produced using conventional techniques, says the UK’s Food Standards Authority (FSA), with the recent publication of a scientific study.
Wednesday, 09 September 2009
European institutes and companies have begun work on a multi-million Euro effort to develop manufacturing methods for liquid biofuel from agricultural and forestry waste. The NEMO (Novel high performance enzymes and micro-organisms for conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to bioethanol) project has received €5.9m funding from the European Union. Agricultural and forestry waste, such as straw and wood chips, are mainly lignocellulose. This consists of sugars but in a form that makes them difficult to be used by microbes in the production of ethanol. Over the next four years, researchers in the NEMO project will develop enzymes that can be used to cut lignocellulose into sugar compounds suitable for fermentation. The goal will be to tailor the metabolism of microbes so that they can produce large volumes of ethanol out of the biomass sugars economically and efficiently.
Friday, 04 September 2009
This report produced by Concord forms part of the work being undertaken by European development NGOs to monitor and advocate on European aid. It reports that some of the countries deliver aid based on their own priorities and not those of the poor while addressing the symptoms and not the causes - and yet they deliver the majority of the global aid flows. It adds that evidence shows that when aid is delivered well, it has been crucial in improving living conditions of the poor in developing countries.
The European Commission welcomes the provisional figures for 2008 released today indicating that the EU's greenhouse gas emissions fell again for the fourth year running. The European Environment Agency estimates that emissions from the EU-15 member states fell by 1.3% in 2008 compared with 2007 levels, taking them to 6.2% below their levels in the base year (1990 in most cases).
Tuesday, 01 September 2009

The European Commission has today formally approved the Annual Action Programme 2009 for the United Republic of Tanzania providing the country with € 385 million in assistance for budget support and infrastructure programmes that will enable pro-poor economic growth.

This programme is a follow-up to previous sustainable tuna fishery management projects already financed since the 5th EDF.  With a total budget of 14 million Euro, it the most ambitious tuna tagging scheme in the world. It aims to improve scientific knowledge of the state of tuna stocks and tuna exploitation rates in the Indian Ocean region.
Wednesday, 26 August 2009
The European Union and Papua New Guinea signed today the interim Economic Partnership Agreement which was first initialled at the end of 2007. Fiji also initialled the Agreement in 2007 but decided to sign at a later stage. The agreement focuses on trade in goods and includes important provisions on rules of origin for the fisheries sector. The agreement was signed today by EU Trade Commissioner Catherine Ashton on behalf of the European Commission, Mr Anders Ahnlid, Director General for Trade, on behalf of the Swedish Presidency of the EU and The Hon. Samuel Abal, Minister for Foreign Affairs, Trade and Immigration on behalf of Papua New Guinea.
Source: European Commission