Video guest: Josephine Mwangi

November 2017
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EDITO
Saturday, 18 November 2017

Ugandan farmers are increasingly inter-planting coffee, the country's primary export, and banana, a staple food, as a way of coping with the effects of climate change. In densely populated Elgon and Rwenzori Mountains, the two crops have been planted together on smallholder farms despite recommendations under the colonial agricultural extension system to separate these in Central and Western Uganda where land was believed to be plentiful. With growing population pressure and climate change, this is no longer possible. But studies by the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA) and partner organizations show that a Ugandan farmer gets 50 per cent more income from inter cropping coffee and banana than from growing either crop alone

Tuesday, 19 January 2016

Fiji's drought-stricken residents in the Western Division are set for some relief with the delivery of water tanks. The European Union has provided over a million euros to Fiji which will fund a new emergency operations centre and help the supply of water to dry parts in Nadi, Nadroga and Ba provinces, as well as out to the remote Yasawa islands. The Director of the National Disaster Management Office, Akapusi Tuifagalele, says a low pressure system has brought rain recently to relieve residents but the drought is expected to last until the end of March.

Thursday, 14 January 2016

In Uganda, Africa4Climate provides technical assistance to the Kampala city authority (KCCA), supporting its low-carbon and climate change resilient municipal development strategy as well as its energy efficiency strategy. Expertise France used the 21st UN conference on climate change (COP21) in Paris to showcase its sustainable development activities. On 4th December, at the Generation Climate space, Expertise France presented its Africa4Climate project, in conjunction with its financial partners, the French Development Agency (AFD) and the French Global Environment Facility (FFEM).

Wednesday, 13 January 2016

France is leading a worldwide push to increase the amount of carbon locked in soils through better farming practices. Supporters of an initiative launched at the COP 21 summit say this would limit global warming by removing carbon from the atmosphere, while also increasing the range and amount of food farmers produce by improving soil fertility. This would particularly benefit developing countries, according to representatives of the 4 Pour 1000 initiative. It’s a bit of a scientific dream, but we have a lot of evidence that supports this dream.”

Monday, 11 January 2016

The 196 parties to COP21 have specified, in the agreement of 12 December, that climate aid from the countries of the North to the countries of the South, supposed to reach 100 billion dollars annually in 2020, must be regarded as a “lower limit” destined to be increased. For the countries of the North this will involve continuing and surpassing their promise made at the Copenhagen conference in 2009 to repay their “climate debt” by means of public and private financing. The financial commitment of the countries of the North has in fact already been a reality for several years. The European Union, in particular, prides itself on being the biggest contributor of climate-related funding to developing countries.

Friday, 08 January 2016

Trinidad and Tobago and Caribbean countries should ratify as early as possible in their Parliaments, the Paris Agreement on climate change and adaptation, and submit their Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs) to mitigate climate change says African Caribbean Pacific (ACP) grouping Secretary General Dr Patrick “PI” Gomes. “For us, climate change is an existential threat. For us it is survival. It is not only a matter of mitigating, but also looking at adaptation,” he said.  In an interview yesterday, Gomes who is currently in Trinidad on holiday, told Newsday that from April, countries may ratify the Paris Agreement so that it enters into force.

Wednesday, 06 January 2016

The European Union has announced a contribution of €125 million to finance emergency actions in countries affected by the extreme weather phenomenon ‘El Niño’ in Africa, the Caribbean, Central and South America. The current El Niño is expected to be the strongest on record, surpassing the 1997/1998 El Niño. The support, €119 million of which comes from the European Development Fund reserves, and a further €6 million from the humanitarian budget, will contribute to the joint effort of bringing life-saving emergency assistance and increasing resilience in the affected countries.

The Secretary General of the African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) Group of States H.E Dr. Patrick Gomes welcomes the historic outcome of the Paris Climate Change Conference (COP21), which accepted a global agreement on climate change on Saturday. “We are heartened that the Paris Agreement addresses the core concerns expressed by the 79 ACP countries, which have been calling for a legally binding, inclusive, fair, ambitious, durable and dynamic agreement, including a mechanism for periodic review every five years,” stated the Secretary General.

Wednesday, 16 December 2015

Jimmi Jones and wife Sandra Lee’s fish farm in Belize City is unique. His fish tanks supply water and nutrients for his vegetable garden needs and the plants filter the water that is recycled back to the tanks. Jones has been showing off the “JimSan Aquaponics” style of organic farming in meetings across the Caribbean to support efforts by the Caribbean Regional Fisheries Mechanism (CRFM) in promoting aquaculture as a food security option in combatting global climate change. As global warming increases sea temperatures, wild catch fishery could decline by as much as 50 per cent, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has warned.

Tuesday, 15 December 2015

A legally-binding climate agreement has been reached in France after marathon negotiations took the Paris climate summit into a day of overtime on Saturday. The agreement, which was to be adopted on Friday, represents several compromises, including on positions originally held by the Alliance of Small Island States (AOSIS). CARICOM delegations in Paris tell AMG that they are satisfied with that they have been able to enshrine in the text, not least a provision for compensation for loss and damage attributable to climate change, and a mandate to lower global temperature rise to no more than 1.5 degrees Celsius over current levels. The text was not adopted with full support, however.