Video guest: Josephine Mwangi

June 2017
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EDITO
Friday, 23 June 2017

The European Union is set to give Zimbabwe an additional $4.5 million with a view of raising more funds to ease a drought caused by the El Nino weather phenomenon and a crumbling economy. EU ambassador to Zimbabwe, Phillepe Van Demme, told journalists in Harare on Thursday that the regional body confirmed the funding Wednesday. “We will obligate another $4.5 million for Zimbabwe for close monitoring of the challenges and quantification  … through the quick assessment being organized by ZIMVAC that will have more precise figures which will allow not only the EU but member states of the EU and other international partners to go back to their capitals and find out whether additional support can be mobilized.”

In addition to the 42 million Euros the German government committed for drought resilience programmes, a 959 million Br fund was extended for mitigating the impact of the current drought in the country. The fund is earmarked for programmes to be implemented through specific development institutions and development partners-not directly by the government. Joachim Schmidt, Germany's Ambassador to Ethiopia, in a release sent to media described the act as a "gesture of solidarity with the people of Ethiopia" and the government as the lead in mitigating the drought impact.

Friday, 29 January 2016

Brazil is shipping maize to South Africa, a traditional maize exporter suffering from an El Niño-related drought, as it seeks new markets for its growing corn production. razil exported 321,662 tonnes of corn to South Africa in 2015, up from none the previous year, data from the Trade Ministry showed this week. Three more cargoes are on the way or likely to leave Brazilian ports soon, according to shipping data as well as a South African trade source.

Thursday, 28 January 2016

Tonga is one of four Pacific island countries chosen by the Commonwealth Secretariat in London for a study of small island states that looks at governance and levels of vulnerability and resilience to external shocks. Visiting Nuku’alofa this week a team of three researchers were building up a profile of Tonga’s strengths and weaknesses in its ability to govern itself and respond to challenges of many kinds. The information was gathered through consultation and surveys presented at a Resilience Profiling Workshop for different sectors held at the Fa’onelua Convention Centre on January 25, presented by Dr Denny Lewis-Bynoe, the Commonwealth Secretariat’s Adviser and Head of Climate Finance and Small States Economic Policy, with Mr Wonderful Hope Khonje, Economic Officer, and Mr Jean Paul Fabri, a consultant.

The European Union, EU and the Food and Agriculture Organisation FAO have committed about 200 million Euros to boost the Great Green Wall (GGW) Project in six African countries. The gesture which is coming on the heels of the just concluded COP 21 in Paris, is borne out of the the interest of international donors to assist West African countries in the continuous implementation of GGW Project in the Sahara and Sahel regions. Speaking on the sidelines of a regional technical workshop organised by the Food and Agriculture Organisation in Abuja, the Forestry Officer, Forest Assessment, Management and Conservation Division for FAO, Ms. Nora Berrahmouni, said the regional GGW technical restoration workshop involved different GGW countries from West Africa.

Wednesday, 27 January 2016

The Department for International Development of the United Kingdom (DFID) and Food and Agriculture of the United Nations (FAO) recently said they are strengthening their partnership with a new agreement that will benefit future collaborations on a multitude of fronts. "FAO and DFID share a vision for a world where communities are food secure, their productive assets are protected and the world's natural resources are managed sustainably," FAO Director-General José Graziano da Silva, said.

Tuesday, 26 January 2016

The fundamental purpose of farming is to feed humanity. But the reality of contemporary agriculture is often quite different, and it is costing the planet dearly. EurActiv France reports. Europe’s fertile plains produce an abundant cereal crop, some of which ends up as bread or pasta. But much of it is also used for animal feed: maize provides proteins for cattle, and barley, when it is not used to make beer, is exported to feed sheep in Saudi Arabia. And one in ten European cars now runs on biodiesel from rapeseed. The variety of different aims pursued by modern farmers have caused a ten-fold increase in the sector’s environmental impact. Agriculture now accounts for one quarter of the planet's Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, making it one of the most carbon-intensive activities.

Monday, 25 January 2016

Enteric methane emissions due to the poor quality of fodder and diet of ruminants are the subject of an international meeting in Dakar. Twenty researchers from Benin, Niger, Burkina Faso and Mali are in the process of exchanging knowledge and experience with their colleagues from the French agricultural research and international cooperation organisation CIRAD on a project led by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), with the support of an international coalition for the climate (CCAC), to reduce the greenhouse gas effect linked to methane emissions from livestock.

Friday, 22 January 2016

The Department for International Development (DFID) has promised to invest £30million in climate change programme in Nigeria. This is contained in a statement issued by DFID’s Director of Information, Mr Tony Ohaeri on Friday in Abuja. The statement said DFID’s Head of Office, Mr Ben Meller, gave the promise when he paid a visit to the Minister of Agriculture and Rural Development, Chief Audu Ogbeh. “DFID would invest the sum of £30million in climate change programme in Nigeria and we are ready to give financial supports to the rural areas through the Bank of Agriculture. “Challenges such as climate change, finance, infrastructure among others are militating against sustainable growth of the sector.

Government is partnering with the German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) and people in action to establish self-sufficient communities through Permaculture, or the use of modern science for sustainability. John Stollmeyer Director of Caribbean Permaculture Consultants told GIS the idea is to get communities to be creative with ideas for production that are inexpensive to start, but with big profit margins. “We’re setting up a model where we will be teaching permaculture, so people will come in and learn the skills and go back into their communities and share those skills.