Video guest: Josephine Mwangi

October 2017
M T W T F S S
25 26 27 28 29 30 1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31 1 2 3 4 5



SELECT_TAGS :
















Twitter

Follow the CTA Brussels Daily

 

twitter logo

 

facebook logo cta

EDITO
Tuesday, 17 October 2017

Seas and oceans were amongst the major issues on the agenda at 29th ACP-EU Joint Parliamentary Assembly (JPA) in Suva, Fiji. These issues covered development-related dimensions of climate change, biodiversity, renewable energy, fisheries, maritime security, oil and seabed minerals. The ACP-EU JPA brought together lawmakers from across Sub-Saharan Africa, the Caribbean and the Pacific as well as Members of the European Parliament to engage politically and take joint stances on a number of issues of common concern. JPA Co-Chair Hon. Fitz Jackson added, “There needs to be a recognition to the unique challenges SIDS face, which affect their long-term sustainable development.” The JPA intends to publish joint resolutions on the following issues:  financing of investment and trade, including infrastructure, in ACP countries and more.

The European Union EU shall provide funding, of a total of US$10 million to support 14 risk reduction projects in the Caribbean up until the end of 2016. The EU is taking this concrete action following the Caribbean’s positive moves to implement the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, in order to achieve the goal of making communities more resilient in the face of natural hazards. More than 400,000 people are set to benefit, in a region frequently confronted by floods and hurricanes, as well as threats such as landslides and earthquakes.

 

At the UN, the world’s least-developed countries (LDCs) have publically stated that the richer nations have failed to provide essential financial support for a strong new global climate treaty. Tosi Mpanu-Mpanu, from the Democratic Republic of Congo and chairman of the LDC group (which comprises of 48 countries) said, “The [UN] process is flawed by a complete lack of trust and confidence between rich and poor countries (…). Every year there is a watering down of the commitments. (…) Twenty countries contribute 80% of emissions, the rest 20%. Yet we in Africa are being asked to cut emissions. (…) Give us finance, technology.” Amjad Abdulla of the Maldives, chief negotiator for the Alliance of Small Island States (39 countries) underlined, “our target is still to negotiate to hold temperatures to a 1.5C rise. But achieving it is going to be difficult and may require dramatic efforts by humanity.” 

Wednesday, 17 June 2015

Fiji shall host the 29th session of the African Caribbean and Pacific – EU Joint Parliamentary Assembly. This is a milestone achievement for the country, given that the Fijian parliament is barely six months old. Parliamentarians from 78 countries in the ACP and EU region will gather to discuss issues that are currently affecting these regions, including climate change, democratization, challenges of empowerment of women and others issues. EU’s Head of Delegation Andrew Jacobs said that the meeting also shows the confidence the region has in Fiji’s parliamentary democracy and the effective establishment and operation of Fiji’s parliament.

Wednesday, 10 June 2015

The 9th edition of European Development Days 2015 (EDD2015) took place from 3-4th June at Tour & Taxi, Brussels. The panel addressed the impact of cyclone Pam which hit the Pacific in March 2015, with winds gusting to around 300 km per hour and seas surging onto the islands, specifically in Vanuatu, destroying crops, uprooting trees and flattening infrastructure. It took into consideration the number of shared issues between the African Caribbean and Pacific Group of States' small island developing states (SIDS) including their geographical isolation, their limited size (and thus minor agricultural sectors and reduced domestic markets), and their vulnerability to climate hazards and climate change.

Friday, 05 June 2015

Ségolène Royal, the environment minister and former presidential candidate, said developing countries are “waiting to see” what rich nations will offer them in global warming talks. In her view, climate change was not merely a question of economics, but “a matter of civilization.” Royal explained, “Developing countries are not hostile [to an agreement]; I would say that they are positive, but they are waiting to see. We have to meet their expectations.” In contrast, she added, “the financial sector has been extremely predatory on natural resources for a long time.” Currently, more than 30 countries, including the EU and the US, have submitted emissions plans to the UN. Developed countries are expected to make absolute cuts in their emissions, by 2025 or 2030, as agreed at the landmark Copenhagen climate conference in 2009. Poorer countries are required only to curb the future growth of their emissions.

Monday, 01 June 2015

The 9th edition of European Development Days 2015 (EDD2015) will take place from 3-4th June at Tour & Taxi, Brussels. The panel addresses the impact of cyclone Pam which hit the Pacific in March 2015, with winds gusting to around 300 km per hour and seas surging onto the islands, specifically in Vanuatu, destroying crops, uprooting trees and flattening infrastructure. It takes into consideration the number of shared issues between the African Caribbean and Pacific Group of States' small island developing states (SIDS) including their geographical isolation, their limited size (and thus minor agricultural sectors and reduced domestic markets), and their vulnerability to climate hazards and climate change. Speakers include Michael Hailu, CTA’s Director, Dominique Burgeon, Director of FAO's Emergency and Rehabilitation Division, Jethro Green, Executive Secretary of the Caribbean Farmer's Network, Len Ishamel, Ambassador of the Eastern Caribbean States and Mission to the European Union, Roy Mickey Joy, Ambassador of Vanuatu to the European Union.

Caribbean leaders are hoping that France can demonstrate its commitment to assisting their adaptation efforts by re-joining the Barbados-based Caribbean Development Bank (CDB). St. Vincent and the Grenadines Prime Minister Dr. Ralph Gonsalves raised the issue of France’s CDB membership with French President Francois Hollande during his visit to the French Caribbean island of Martinique. Prime Minister of St. Kitts and Nevis Dr. Timothy Harris, who is chair of the CDB’s Board of Governors, the bank’s highest policy making body said that building resilience to climate change and natural disasters remains among the issues that “need critical attention in the context of reshaping a credible agenda for Caribbean development (…) I think it will enhance France’s own involvement in the region but beyond the region as a major country interested in bringing justice to small island developing states, many of which are found in the Caribbean region.”

Friday, 29 May 2015

Caribbean leaders advanced their policy position on climate change ahead of the 21st Conference of Parties, ( COP 21). , scheduled for Paris during November and December of this year.  Caribbean Community (CARICOM) – made up of 14 independent countries – leaders were represented by the group’s chairman, Bahamas Prime Minister Perry Christie, during their latest meeting in Martinique with French President François Hollande. PM Christie explained,  “For the Bahamas, which has 80 percent of its land mass within one metre of mean sea level, climate change is an existential threat.(…)  The evidence of the impact of climate change within our region is very evident. Grenada saw a 300 percent loss of GDP (Gross Domestic Product) as a result of one storm (…)

Friday, 15 May 2015

As the world’s biggest user and importer of biodiesel, the recent European Parliament ruling which  limits the use of crop-based biofuels is a strong signal that the EU is engaged to meet its  energy targets. Moreover, it also signals the end of a long running debate on the detrimental implications of  biofuel demand for transport on food prices, hunger, forest destruction, land consumption and climate change. Food crops, such as palm oil, soy and rapeseed are currently being used for transport fuel. However, this ruling indicates that the EU shall proactively limit biofuel production from agricultural crops to 7% of EU transport energy, and EU member states have the option to go lower than this.