Video guest: Josephine Mwangi

May 2017
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EDITO
Monday, 29 May 2017

Renewable energy projects across the world received funding worth $6 billion in 2015 from multilateral banks, a recent report has revealed. The World Bank, The European Investment Bank (EIB), the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), the Asian Development Bank (ADB), the African Development Bank (AfDB), and the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) provided a total of $25 billion in climate finance across the world. Around 20% of this investment (i.e., $5 billion) went into adaptation projects, while the remaining 80% was invested into mitigation projects.

The most vulnerable of the urban population in Lagos are among beneficiaries of a N4 billion loan procured by the Lagos Government. Part of the loan is meant for enhancing the management and treatment of solid waste as well as strengthening the capacities of the State Government to implement integrated urban development projects. Details of the projects released by Hugo Pierrel, the Acting Country Director, of the Agence Francaise de Developement, AFD, (French Agency for Development), as part of its annual report also indicates that there was another loan of $33 million for an Ogun State Urban Water Supply Project, targeted at increasing the coverage steadiness and the quality of water supply in the State capital (Abeokuta).

At present, over 31 million Africans are migrants who live outside the country of their birth, the majority within the African continent itself. In 2015, about 14% of arrivals in Europe were African migrants. Several migrant related events in recent years, most notably perhaps the April 2015 shipwreck that claimed the lives of 800 Africans off the coast of Italy, have significantly raised the discourse on migration to centre stage in both public and political arenas, leading to the Valletta Euro-Africa Summit in November 2015.

Tuesday, 13 September 2016

Netherlands has unveiled a Euro 3,5 million ($3,9 million) fund to mitigate the effects of the El Nino induced drought through a number of strategies including providing crop and livestock inputs in the affected areas. A total of seven non-governmental organisations namely; Plan International Zimbabwe, Terres De Homes, World Vision, International Rescue committee, Cordaid and ICCO/Act-Alliance have joined hands under Zimbabwe Joint Drought Response (ZIMJR) Initiative to implement the project.

The St. Peter's Church Aided High School of England has donated maize worth K2 million to nearly 400 families of Sub-Traditional Authority (STA) Chitanthamapiri in Kasungu. The donation follows media reports on how badly the area had been affected by the dry spell most parts of the country experienced during the 2015/2016 growing season. The area under Chitanthamapiri's jurisdiction received almost no rain the past season resulting into complete loss of every crop the subjects had sown.

On a tour of Senegal, Niger and Rwanda, German Development Minister Gerd Müller repeated his call for a Marshall Plan for Africa. But is a post-World War II-style recovery program realistic or even necessary? Gerd Müller makes his way on foot across the arid field in Cayar, a small town in Senegal. After a few steps, he reaches the greener part of the field, which is being irrigated with the help of a solar-powered pump funded by Germany's development ministry. The irrigation has increased the farmer's crop yield and he is understandably delighted.

François Hollande has announced an increase to France’s official development assistance budget for 2017, putting an end to several consecutive years of funding cuts. EurActiv France reports. “France must set the example on development assistance,” the president told an assembly of French ambassadors at a meeting in Paris on Tuesday (30 August). With negotiations on France’s 2017 finance bill looming on the horizon, Hollande promised to increase France’s development spending, which has suffered year-on-year cuts since he began his mandate in 2012.

Strict aid accounting rules mean the international community is reluctant to finance security operations in Africa’s troubled Sahel region, leaving France all but alone in tackling this sensitive issue. Sandwiched between the Sahara desert and Africa’s tropical forests, the Sahel region is in dire need of peace and security. As several experts noted at the Convergences World Forum in Paris this week, the region’s development is being held back by a lack of international interest in solving its security problems.

Wednesday, 07 September 2016

The Ambassador of the EU earlier this week announced that the EU will be donating an amount of US$20 million to assist various projects including drought relief, to help northern farmers with veterinary services, land development, water supply and NGO's. The Ambassador noted "The idea of this project is to increase the market price of cattle by 17% over five years. The only way this can be done is to decrease the number of cattle in the northern areas hoping that it will also prevent over-grazing and promote the quality of meat. The project will be initiated in October this year and different farmers and stakeholders will still be engaged" the Ambassador added.

The Fiji Red Cross and International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies(IFRC) will rebuild 10 cyclone-resistant homes in the Western Division. This will be used as a plan by others whose homes were destroyed by Severe TC Winston. The project will be funded by the EU. IFRC shelter delegate Colin Price said the construction of those 10 houses would be spread across the 10 most affected Red Cross branches in Fiji. "They will be used as a training ground and the means of communicating build back safer awareness sessions to 5000 households," he said.