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October 2017
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EDITO
Friday, 20 October 2017

The European Union (EU) and the Samoan Government have signed a 20.2 million Euro/SAT 58 million in Water and Sanitation. This Financial agreement was signed by the Prime Minister Tuilaepa Aiono Sailele Malielegaoi and the European Union Commissioner for International Cooperation & Development, Neven Mimica during the European Development Day summit in Brussels yesterday. European Union Commissioner for International Cooperation and Development, Mimica stated that the agreement would strengthen the cooperation with Samoa in water and sanitation.

The European Commission Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection Department has contributed €12.5 million to the World Food Programme (WFP). The United Nations programme plans to use the bulk of the contribution to provide sorghum to more than 100,000 displaced people in Darfur for several months. Sorghum is a staple food in Sudan. WFP plans to provide the grain to 137,000 displaced Darfuris for three months with €10.5 million of the contribution, along with pulses for more than 180,000 South Sudanese refugees for six months. WFP will also use part of the contribution to support 88,200 displaced people across Darfur with cash-based transfers in the form of food vouchers for three months.

As the world marks the Refugee Day today, the United Kingdom has announced an additional 15 million pounds (47.158bn/-) in humanitarian aid to help the ever-increasing displaced Burundians in Tanzania. The support brings the total UK assistance to the current refugee influx to £29.25 million (90bn/-) since June 2015. This follows a previously provided £14.25 million for food, medical care and clean water to help the growing number of Burundians who have fled their country since April 2015 to seek refuge in Tanzania.

Thursday, 23 June 2016

A further $11.9 million has been made available to Fiji by the European Union to support sustainable energy and agriculture projects in the country. European Commissioner for International Cooperation and Development Neven Mimica announced this at the Pacific Conference on Sustainable Energy and Climate Change in New Zealand this week and said the funding was part of $34.5m that was distributed to Fiji, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Papua New Guinea (PNG) and Timor Leste.

Friday, 17 June 2016

The European Union will provide Cabo Verde (Cape Verde) with 5 million euros to be invested in strengthening the country’s institutions, the EU representative in Cabo Verde, José Manuel Pinto Teixeira, said recently. “We are completing the next budget support programme, which will be available after the summer in the initial amount of 50 million euros and will also have a new 5 million-euro package for institutional capacity building programmes,” said the EU representative. During the presentation session, in Praia, of eight projects to strengthen Cape Verdean institutions supported by the European Union with 1.5 million euros, José Manuel Pinto Teixeira gave assurances that the European Union will continue to support the archipelago.

Source: macauhub.com.mo

Monday, 06 June 2016

The European Union on Tuesday announced an additional 10 million euros in humanitarian aid to help Burundian refugees who have fled to neighbouring countries. Some 265,000 Burundians have fled the country since a crisis was sparked in April 2015 by President Pierre Nkurunziza’s controversial decision to stand for a third term in office. “The situation is really putting the host countries, particularly Tanzania, under stretched-to-the-limit conditions,” Alexandre Polack, spokesperson for the EU’s Humanitarian Aid and Crisis Management, told RFI. “We’ve identified a risk of infections and epidemics,” he added, as the UN refugee agency has identified malaria and diarrhoea as key health issues. The 10 million euros for assisting Burundian refugees is in addition to 12.2 million euros of EU humanitarian aid for the Burundi crisis provided since the start of 2016. The money will help improve shelter, food, supplies of safe drinking water, access to hygiene and sanitation.

Source: en.rfi.fr

The leaders of the world’s most developed countries have agreed to increase their aid contributions to developing countries, particularly those directly affected by the refugee crisis. “The G7 recognises the ongoing large-scale movements of migrants and refugees as a global challenge which requires a global response,” the G7 leaders stated in their final declaration from the Japan summit, which closed on Friday (27 May). In 2015, around 1.3 million migrants applied for asylum in the European Union (...) To tackle the migration crisis, the global leaders pledged to increase their international aid budgets. “We commit to increase global assistance to meet immediate and long-term needs of refugees and other displaced persons as well as their host communities,” the seven leaders said. Composed of the United States, Japan, Germany, the United Kingdom, France, Italy and Canada, the G7 gave no precise indication of what this promise would mean in practice. But the leaders referred to the international objective of allocating 0.7% of gross national income (GNI) to international solidarity efforts.

Source: euractiv.com

The Council of Sugar Cane Growers has welcomed the European Union's $23 million direct aid to the agriculture and sugar sectors. Council CEO Sundresh Chetty said the aid package would significantly boost the confidence of canefarmers in Ba, Tavua and Rakiraki who were among the hardest hit by Severe Tropical Cyclone Winston. Prime Minister and Minister for Sugar Voreqe Bainimarama signed an agreement with EU Commissioner for International Cooperation and Development Neven Mimica at the EU-ACP Summit in Port Moresby yesterday. "During a time when many growers are still trying to piece their lives and livelihoods together after the devastation caused by Severe TC Winston, this is certainly good news," Mr Chetty said. "It is very timely and growers welcome this mammoth contribution by the EU towards assisting the sector. But what we would like to see is more discussions are held with stakeholders on how best this money could be utilised.

Source: fijitimes.com

Today 1 June, European Commissioner for International Cooperation and Development, Neven Mimica, will begin his visit to the Pacific Region, where he will announce new support for post cyclones Pam (in Vanuatu) and Winston (in Fiji) recovery and response to the effects El Niño (for the most affected six Pacific countries) and together with New Zealand Foreign Affairs Minister Murray McCully and New Zealand Climate Change Minister Paula Bennett, will leave for a joint official visit to Vanuatu, Kiribati and Tuvalu. The Commissioner will conclude his visit in New Zealand by co-hosting a high-level conference on energy, agriculture and climate change in the Pacific. The visit will also be an occasion to expand the cooperation with New Zealand in energy with Tonga and Nieu, as well as in agriculture in Vanuatu. EU Commissioner for International Cooperation and Development, Neven Mimica, said: "The European Commission is amongst the Pacific's leading partners, not only in the struggle against climate change, but also in achieving sustainable development in the region. In addition to the €634 million allocated for the Pacific Region in the period 2014-2020, we will be contributing additional 54,5 million for climate change mitigation and climate relevant actions. We value the strong foundations of our partnership and remain committed to contribute to the wellbeing of the citizens of the Pacific."

Source: scoop.co.nz

The impact of natural disasters is increasing, despite countries’ efforts to reduce it. Over the past year, drought has affected more than 6.2 million people in the Caribbean, especially in Haiti, the Dominican Republic and Cuba. Irregular and insufficient rainfall throughout 2015 has caused loss of crop and livestock in the region. For the third consecutive year, some people are facing periods of drought that threaten their livelihood, with the most vulnerable groups being small producers, day-labourers and people with no land of their own. In this context, the European Commission’s Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection department (ECHO) is contributing 13.9 million euros to help the Caribbean cope with drought in 2016, facilitating access to food and water, and protecting the livelihoods of more than 429 000 people. The European Commission has allocated 12.2 million euros of this contribution to Haiti, 1.1 million euros to the Dominican Republic and 600 000 euros to Cuba.

Source: nationnews.com