Video guest: Josephine Mwangi

October 2017
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EDITO
Tuesday, 17 October 2017

Fruit producers and exporters from Cameroon, the Ivory Coast and Ghana have officially launched AFRUIBANA, an association that will allow fruit producers on the continent to combine their efforts with a view to having their voices heard better in international trade. During a visit to Brussels, Cameroon Trade Minister, Luc Magloire Mbarga Atangana, launched the association to European institutions on Wednesday, July 19. As representative of the African, Caribbean and Pacific Group of States (ACP) during the various Councils of Ministers addressing the banana industry, the minister was lauded for this initiative, which is on a mission to defend the interests of African fruit farming.

As the federal government continues its advocacy for greater farming,communities in Southern Kaduna have taken the gauntlet and returned to their farms. LEADERSHIP visit to Fadan Kagoma, Jemaa local government in Kaduna State showed the land green as almost every parcel is now cultivated. Most common produce seen on the farms include ginger, groundnuts, maize and Guinea corn. Speaking with Leadership a small holder farmer, Mrs Joy Bulus said this year almost everybody returned to the farm. She said "things have been so hard for everybody that the only option is to return to the farm. As it is ,it is most rewarding and no matter how hard it is one cannot complain of the rewards of farming,because no,matter how hard it is there would always be food and even a little extra for other things"

The historical background of organic agriculture in Tanzania goes back to the world history of agriculture, when people were farming more traditionally. This is to say modern organic farming still has roots from the first half of the 20th century, when there was growing reliance on non-organic methods. After the industrial revolution had introduced synthetic methods, most of which were not well-developed and had serious side effects, an organic movement began in the 1940s, as a reaction to agriculture's growing reliance on synthetic fertilisers and pesticides.

Solomon Islands fish exporters will get a boost under a new project supported and led by the Standards and Trade Development Facility and the Food and Agriculture Organisation or FAO. The FAO said the new fish project will give Solomon Islands fish exporters an added access to the European market and they will stand to benefit from the global partnership on safe trade. The FAO will lead the project which runs until May 2020 with a total budget of over $US500,000.

Monday, 24 July 2017

Kerala is seeking to collaborate with supplier countries in Africa to avoid the role of middlemen in procuring raw cashew nuts for the hundreds of processing factories based here. It is hosting a two-day conclave on 'Cashew trade for common good' in association with the Ministry of External Affairs (MEA) involving diplomats from the African countries. AFRICAN REPRESENTATION Among the African nations being represented are Madagascar, Kenya, Mozambique, Tanzania, Gambia, Togo, and Mali.

For the 50th anniversary of the creation of the Organisation of African Unity (now the AU), African leaders adopted the Agenda 2063: The Africa We Want - a vision for a prosperous Africa based on inclusive growth and sustainable development. One of the defining features of this agenda is the structural transformation of African economies towards achieving shared growth, decent jobs and economic opportunities for all. So far, the structural transformation that shifts productive resources from agriculture and mining to manufacturing - which has helped many countries achieve greater prosperity - has bypassed most African countries. According to a recent International Monetary Fund report, the limited structural transformation in Africa has not translated into more jobs because the manufacturing sector itself requires extensive reform.

Thursday, 20 July 2017

Two agreements, namely on the establishment of the France Development Agency (AFD) in Angola and another one relating to the financing of water projects, were signed last Friday, in Luanda. The first agreement was signed by the Finance minister, Archer Mangueira, and by the French ambassador, Silvain Itté. This agreement is aimed at enabling the AFD to officially in Angola and work in financing projects linked to the areas of waters, energy and agriculture. The second agreement was signed by minister Archer Mangueira and the resident representative of the World Bank in Angola, Clara de Sousa, as well as the director of the France Development Agency (AFD), Martha Stein- Scochas.

The MEP said support for Britain leaving the European Union is surging in Africa, where regulations from Brussels are wildly unpopular. He said EU tariffs imposed on, for example, tomato sauce but not on tomatoes themselves reduce the opportunities Africa has to trade successfully with Europe. Instead, African countries are forced to export basic ingredients, losing out to more lucrative products due to the cost of exporting them. With Britain laving the EU, African states will enjoy a greater variety of what it can export to the country. In exchange, the UK will benefit from cheaper food, something Mr Hanna said will boost the economy as a whole and help poorer people in particular. Writing for the Telegraph, Mr Hannan said the Brexit tide had long since turned in Africa.

Wednesday, 19 July 2017

The migrant crisis on Europe's doorstep has returned to the headlines. In reality, it never went away; people are fleeing war, persecution, or just seeking a better life in unprecedented numbers. The pressure will grow unless we take urgent steps to address the drivers of this crisis. In Africa, 55,000 jobs will need to be created every day just to absorb new entrants into the workforce by 2035. If the economic aspirations of this young population cannot be met in their own countries, we will see more uncontrolled and unsustainable migration. Britain is at the forefront of the response. We are taking immediate steps to protect our borders and tackle people smuggling.

The further you travel from Brussels, the likelier people are to see Brexit as an opportunity. I’m in Kampala, discussing post-EU commercial prospects with business and political leaders from across East Africa. While not everyone here started as a Leaver, there is now a widespread hope that Brexit will lead to more open trade arrangements, above all in farming, which employs two thirds of Africa’s workforce. The EU’s Common Agricultural Policy treats Africa as an economic colony. Brussels applies tariffs to tomato sauce, but not to tomatoes; to chocolate, but not to cocoa beans; to roasted coffee, but not to green coffee.