Video guest: Josephine Mwangi

October 2017
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Sunday, 22 October 2017

The French group Somdiaa announced at the end of September that it was committed, as part of its Sustainable Development Policy, to implementing ‘green harvesting’ in some of its subsidiaries (Cameroon, Gabon, Côte d’Ivoire), in particular in the sugar sector. ‘Green harvesting,’ says Somdiaa, ‘has many advantages, including reducing the use of chemical fertilisers thanks to biomass (residual straw) from the harvest.’ The French agro-industrial group hopes that this cultivation technique will also lead to a reduction in the use of herbicides, in soil erosion and CO2 emissions into the atmosphere. The ultimate goal is to improve the quality of the sugar cane.

With the quotas for the production and export of sugar coming to an end on 30 September, the European Union, which until now was a net importer of sugar, is poised to become an exporter. African producers, already facing very low prices, will have to deal with this new competition. Since 30 September, there is no longer a limit on the production or export of sugar within the European Union. The decision, taken by Brussels in mid-2014 as part of its reform of the Common Agricultural Policy, is not without consequences for African countries, whose local production will have to compete with European sugar.

Wednesday, 18 October 2017

Over 65 Dutch companies dominated this year’s Eldoret agribusiness trade fair which came to a close at the University of Eldoret. The trade fair was aimed at furnishing farmers, service providers and industry suppliers with distinctive opportunity to exhibit their products for bench-marking and trade. The fair also provided a platform to farmers and agricultural sector stakeholders to learn emerging technologies and exchange ideas with industry players on how to boost agribusiness in the country. Various dignitaries graced the occasion among them Netherlands ambassador Frans makenn and Eldoret VC Professor Teresia Akenga.

Monday, 16 October 2017

The Spanish engineering and consulting firm Incatema Consulting has obtained the green light from the Angolan government for an agropastoral project in the Samba Caju municipality in Cuanza Norte province. The news was announced by the Angolan news agency (Angop). With an overall cost of $73 million, the initiative aims to develop the region’s agricultural potential in line with the government’s objective of promoting projects that improve agricultural production and processing. According to Angop, the Angolan Finance Ministry is expected to support the Spanish company by creating the necessary conditions for the project to be carried out.

For the first time in ten years, famine is no longer in retreat across the world, according to the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO). This disaster can in part by explained by climate change and armed conflicts. But it is also the result of free trade agreements, which impose a lifting of cross-border restrictions that is destabilising for local agriculture. The winds of free trade are blowing across the African continent. On the one hand, the European Union is stepping up its pressure on African countries to finalise the signature of Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs), and to end non-reciprocal trade preferences: in order to retain the exemption from tariffs on their exports to Europe, Africans will have to remove 80% of those applying to imports from the Single Market.

From his chair in the middle of a pile of pineapples, Jean-Xavier Satola supervises cutting and packaging, as Benin — Africa’s fourth-biggest exporter of the fruit — starts trading again after an eight-month self-imposed absence. The fields of Allada in southern Benin are a hive of activity as about 20 men, in trousers to protect them from the spiky leaves, pick the pineapples while women load them in baskets and carry them away on their heads. The smooth, fat, yellow Cayenne variety of pineapples are washed, packed into cardboard boxes and put on a lorry. Eight hundred boxes will leave on a plane for Europe that evening. Satola has been in the pineapple business for 30 years and as soon as he got the green light from the government was Benin’s first trader to resume exports. “I’m at 46 tonnes since the start of the year. It’s less than half than in September 2016,” he said. “Resumption is slow. Some of our European clients are hesitant. But we’re exporting more guaranteed quality now.”

The Gambia Government through the office of the Vice President and the Ministry of Women's Affairs, in close partnership with the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations, has launched a 4.4 million Euro project entitled, "Improving Food Security and Nutrition in the Gambia, Through Food Fortification. The event was held on Tuesday 26th September 2017, at a local hotel in Senegambia. The multi million Euro project is funded by the European Union and aims to improve nutrition and health outcomes of vulnerable women and children in the Gambia, especially women, girls and children in the North Bank and Central River regions of the country.

Thursday, 12 October 2017

Thirteen companies from Netherlands have announced their plan to attend the Poultry Africa 2017 expo and leadership conference that will be held in Kigali from October 4th. Their mission is organized by the Netherlands-African Business Council (NABC), the leading network of Dutch companies that do business with Africa, and has 350 members. A majority of them is active in the agricultural sector. During the conference, these companies will learn and build strong partnership with Rwandans in poultry sector.

The very last agricultural quota system in place, managing sugar production in the EU, were scrapped on 30 September, after nearly 50 years, part of a major CAP reform and restructuring process. The sugar quota system was introduced with the first Common Agricultural Policy rules on sugar in 1968, along with a support price for producers set at a level significantly above the world market price. The decision to end the quota system for sugar was taken by EU Member States in 2006. The end of the quota system follows significant reform of the sector from The very last agricultural quota system in place, managing sugar production in the European Union, were scrapped on 30 September 2017, after nearly 50 years

Monday, 09 October 2017

In Zambia, the 2016/17 crop year will end with a 6% drop in sugar production. According to the forecasts of the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), Zambia will produce about 388,405 tonnes of sugar compared to 411,279 tonnes last year. This slight contraction in volume is due to a deterioration in the quality of sugar cane, as well as a reduction in the quantity of sugar cane transported to refineries, due to energy restrictions which have impacted on irrigation, and to the drought which affected the growing season. Zambia’s sugar industry is dominated by Zambia Sugar PLC, a subsidiary of Illovo Sugar, a South African company that produces around 92.5% of the country’s sugar production. The country exports about half of its production, mainly to other countries in Africa and to the European Union.

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