Video guest: Josephine Mwangi

September 2017
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EDITO
Tuesday, 26 September 2017

A Rwandan Chili pepper farmer is silently harvesting money season after season as he gradually captures foreign markets. Dieudonné Twahirwa the founder of Gashora Farm Ltd grows chili pepper on 150 hectares of land in Bugesera district and other parts of the country. He harvests 10 metric tones of dry chili every season. An Indian company- Akay Flavours and Aromatics pvt ltd was the first to purchase chili from Gashora Farm and directly exports to the United Kingdom. Since 2016 Twahirwa has been supplying the Indian company. Twahirwa broke the ice during an encounter with agro experts at International Trade Center (ITC) through its project Supporting Indian Trade and Investment for Africa (SITA). “This meeting facilitated me to reach international markets. They facilitated me to attend the international spice conference in India, I have met different international buyers, now I have buyers from Belgium, France, India, Netherlands of the dry African bird eye chili,” Twahirwa said.

The European Union (EU) and ECOWAS Commission have urged the managers of the Nigerian economy to sign the Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) to fast-track its quest for economic diversification and regional integration. ‎The Head of Trade and Economic Section, EU Delegation to Nigeria and ECOWAS, Filippo Amato, gave the charge during ‎the Lagos Chamber of Commerce and Industry, LCCI, Stakeholders forum on EU-ECOWAS Economic Partnership Agreement in Lagos recently. According to him, signing the EPA would accelerate Nigeria's industrial development, discard EU tariffs on Nigerian exports; protect domestic industries, agricultural and consumer products.

Tuesday, 29 August 2017

When Trinidad and Tobago received a yellow card from the European Union last year for illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing, the country's government was motivated to take steps to remedy one of the problems plaguing the twin island nation’s fishing industry for decades. However, the yellow card served to highlight systemic problems with the management of Trinidad and Tobago's fisheries that has led to important fish stocks being overexploited or fully exploited. The overexploitation or full exploitation of important fisheries has meant that local fishermen “have to go farther and farther to catch fewer and fewer fish,” said Terrence Beddoe, president of the NGO Fishermen and Friends of the Sea of Trinidad and Tobago (FFOS).

Secretary-General of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Ambassador Irwin LaRocque has urged Sweden to use its position in two major international organizations to highlight the unfair labelling of some of the Community’s Member States as “non-cooperative tax jurisdictions”. Speaking at the CARICOM Secretariat’s Turkeyen, Guyana headquarters during the accreditation ceremony of Sweden’s news Ambassador to the Community, the Secretary-General pointed out that as regional countries try to diversify their economies and build their services sector, some engaged in financial services have been labelled as “non-cooperative tax jurisdictions”.

The Southern African Development Community (SADC) and the European Union (EU) have formally launched the implementation of projects valued at 31.6 million Euros. The projects were launched under the Trade Related Facility (TRF), which was established through a contribution agreement between the EU and SADC in 2014. The objective of the TRF is to improve the participation of SADC Member States in regional and international trade in order to contribute to sustainable development within the SADC region. Projects being supported by the TRF mainly focus on customs cooperation, technical barriers to trade, sanitary and phytosanitary measures, rules of origin, trade facilitation, industrial development, trade promotion and development, and trade in services.

Thursday, 24 August 2017

Rainforest Seafoods, a Caribbean seafood exporter with headquarters in Jamaica, began exporting conch and spiny lobster caught in Jamaica's water to the European Union and the United Arab Emirates at the start of 2017. It also began exporting lobster to China and the United States last December, according to a news release carried on the company's website. The company's CEO, Brian Jardim, said in a company-issued release that “having established the seafood chain as a major supplier to the Caribbean, Rainforest is now focused on extending its reach to other global markets.”

African exporters could lose out to rival markets, researcher warns, with developing countries at risk of losing preferential access to UK market. Brexit could harm trade between the UK and Africa, with fears on the continent that certain African countries could lose out to larger markets when the UK leaves the bloc. Several African nations, including South Africa and Kenya, send significant quantities of fresh produce to the UK and there are concerns that tariffs could rise and exporters in certain countries could lose the preferential access to the UK market that they currently enjoy through Britain’s membership of the EU.

Monday, 21 August 2017

The President is viewing her State Visit to Ghana this week in the spirit of exploring engagement with part of the world with which Malta has had very little contact. Ghana is fast becoming a regional hub for opportunities in other West African markets, in the same way that Malta is being seen as a gateway to the wider Mediterranean and as a bridge to Europe. “Malta is well-known and well-regarded in the North African region, thanks to significant trade and cultural engagement over a long period of time between Malta and our Mediterranean neighbours to the south,” President Coleiro Preca said. “Yet, our historical engagement with sub-Saharan Africa has been less pronounced.

Supporting CARIFORUM firms to leverage the CARIFORUM-EU Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) is at the forefront of the Caribbean Export Development Agency’s work programme as they implement the 11th EDF Regional Private Sector Development Programme (RPSDP) funded by the European Union. Over 70 business and Business Support Organisations participated in the specially held workshop at the Trinidad and Tobago Manufacturers’ Association’s (TTMA) Trade and Investment Convention (TIC) on Friday 7th July and a further 90 persons were able to participate via the live streaming.

Wednesday, 26 July 2017

Zimbabwe will not be exporting beef anytime soon because of regular outbreaks of foot-and-mouth (FMD) disease and government does not have resources to eliminate the disease, according to deputy Agriculture Minister Paddy Zhanda. The southern African nation has experienced regular outbreaks of FMD — a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals — in recent times in cattle-rich regions of Matabeleland and Midlands, which killed hundreds of cattle in those regions over the past four years, The Insider reports. “Zimbabwe will not export for the meantime because of foot-and-mouth and we don’t have resources to deal with.