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October 2017
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EDITO
Sunday, 22 October 2017
Two southern African nations abruptly refused to sign a free-trade agreement with the EU at the last minute before they together with four other countries were due to sign on the dotted line. The EC announced the signing of an Economic Partnership Agreement with the Eastern and Southern Africa regional grouping (ESA) of nations, but in the end, only Mauritius, Seychelles, Zimbabwe, and Madagascar. The setback for the commission's trade negotiators comes in the wake of two other recent failures to convince developing nations to sign up to its trade deals.
Friday, 04 September 2009
The Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, the European Commission and the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) signed a Memorandum of Understanding(MoU), on August 24th, committing euro 5.9 million  to a food facility initiative, in keeping with the Government's food security programme. The MoU was signed by Agriculture and Fisheries Minister, Dr. the Hon. Christopher Tufton; Head of the EC's Delegation to Jamaica, Ambassador Marco Mazzocchi Alemanni; and FAO representative to Jamaica, The Bahamas and Belize, Dr. Dunstan Campbell. The signing took place at the Ministry in Kingston.
Friday, 04 September 2009
The East African Community is trading “free” with the EU — without a binding agreement — following the expiry of an interim arrangement and the failure by teams negotiating from both parties to settle on a comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement. The interim arrangement entered into last November was to forestall interruption of trade after the Cotonou Agreement was outlawed by the World Trade Oganisation when it came to an end in December 2007. In the year and a half since then, the EU and the East African Community, together with other African, Caribbean and Pacific trade blocs, have failed to agree on the way forward, with the July 31 deadline by which an Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) was to have been in place, having come and gone.
This report produced by Concord forms part of the work being undertaken by European development NGOs to monitor and advocate on European aid. It reports that some of the countries deliver aid based on their own priorities and not those of the poor while addressing the symptoms and not the causes - and yet they deliver the majority of the global aid flows. It adds that evidence shows that when aid is delivered well, it has been crucial in improving living conditions of the poor in developing countries.
The Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC) will receive 4 million EURO over five years to implement the project. During the 2006 Pacific Islands Heads of Agriculture and Forestry Services meeting, SPC’s Land Resource Division was asked to submit a proposal to the EU to fund a pilot project on Facilitating Agricultural Commodity Trade (FACT).
The Europeans are mounting pressure on African countries to sign the controversial Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA). But experts have warned against it. They argued that it favours Europe only and that economic development in Africa must be allowed to kick-off out of internal evolution. But the news filtering out is that the West African sub continent is about to sign the deal.
A number of Namibian civil society organisations, as well as the Namibia Chamber of Commerce and Industry (NCCI), have supported the government’s decision not to sign the interim Economic Partnership Agreement (I-EPA) with the European Union, amid concerns that it caused discord among Southern African Customs Union (Sacu) member States.
The European Union has today signed an interim Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) with countries from the Eastern and Southern Africa regional grouping (ESA). These countries are Mauritius, Seychelles, Zimbabwe and Madagascar. Zambia and Comoros have indicated they will sign at a later date. The agreement was signed in Grand Baie, Mauritius, by EU Trade Commissioner Catherine Ashton and Swedish deputy trade minister Gunnar Wieslander on behalf of the EU.
Tuesday, 01 September 2009

Members of CARIFORUM have made it clear to the European Commission that the 10th European Development Fund (EDF) Regional Indicative Programme, signed between the two entities, is inadequate. The 10th EDF Programme they say is insufficient to meaningfully assist the region in building capacity for the European Partnership Agreement (EPA), while developing cooperation and integration processes. Saint Lucia's Minister for Commerce, Industry and Consumer Affairs Tessa Mangal, who recently represented government at the CARIFORUM/EC Dialogue on Regional Integration and Cooperation, endorses this view.

The European Commission has today formally approved the Annual Action Programme 2009 for the United Republic of Tanzania providing the country with € 385 million in assistance for budget support and infrastructure programmes that will enable pro-poor economic growth.