Video guest: Josephine Mwangi

November 2017
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EDITO
Saturday, 18 November 2017

Four hundred and twenty-one small businesses received financial and logistical support from the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development (DFID) from 2014 to 2017 to develop and implement their business ideas, the Country Director of DFID, Mr Philip Smith, has said. The support, he said, had resulted in over 250 per cent revenue growth of such businesses that had in turn created 1,203 jobs in the country.

The very last agricultural quota system in place, managing sugar production in the EU, were scrapped on 30 September, after nearly 50 years, part of a major CAP reform and restructuring process. The sugar quota system was introduced with the first Common Agricultural Policy rules on sugar in 1968, along with a support price for producers set at a level significantly above the world market price. The decision to end the quota system for sugar was taken by EU Member States in 2006. The end of the quota system follows significant reform of the sector from The very last agricultural quota system in place, managing sugar production in the European Union, were scrapped on 30 September 2017, after nearly 50 years

Monday, 09 October 2017

The European Union plans to invest 27 billion CFA francs in the development of transport and the upkeep of the national road transport network. This was the information given by the EU ambassador to Côte d’Ivoire, Jean-François Valette, on 21 September 2017, during a ceremony for grants given to the Ministries of Transport and Economic Infrastructure. The ceremony took place at the headquarters of the Office for Road Safety (Oser) in Marcory. The ambassador said the EU intended to reinforce its support for the Ivorian government in the development of transport and the road network.

In Zambia, the 2016/17 crop year will end with a 6% drop in sugar production. According to the forecasts of the US Department of Agriculture (USDA), Zambia will produce about 388,405 tonnes of sugar compared to 411,279 tonnes last year. This slight contraction in volume is due to a deterioration in the quality of sugar cane, as well as a reduction in the quantity of sugar cane transported to refineries, due to energy restrictions which have impacted on irrigation, and to the drought which affected the growing season. Zambia’s sugar industry is dominated by Zambia Sugar PLC, a subsidiary of Illovo Sugar, a South African company that produces around 92.5% of the country’s sugar production. The country exports about half of its production, mainly to other countries in Africa and to the European Union.

The 96th session of the International Cocoa Council coupled with the joint annual meeting of the International Cocoa Organisation-European Union and the ACP, has been taking place since Monday in Abidjan, with the sustainable cocoa economy on the agenda, the APA reported on Tuesday from the economic capital of Côte d’Ivoire. The second day of the meeting was devoted to the world cocoa economy, which has been suffering for several years. Delegates at the meeting will work on the drafting and adoption of an agenda for a sustainable cocoa economy, as well as the development of a global strategic action plan with specific measures.

The European Union has banned beef imports from Swaziland following a suspected foot-and-mouth disease outbreak allegedly caused by three buffaloes donated to the country by Zambian President Edgar Lungu early this month.Agriculture Minister Moses Vilakati confirmed the suspension in a statement on Tuesday. “When the buffalos arrived into the country they were accompanied by documents certifying that they had tested negative for the disease,” Vilakati said.

Counsellor and Head of Trade and Economics of the European Union Delegation to Nigeria and the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS), Fillippo Amato, has said trade between Nigeria and European Union (EU) member states stood at 19.9 billion Euros in 2016, Besides, Amato stressed the need for the Nigerian government to expand its tax base in order to diversify its revenue. He disclosed this at a press conference to announce its sixth edition of the EU-Nigeria Business Forum slated for October 5 to 6 in Lagos.

The European Union must make more investment in Africa to ensure Europe's continued prosperity and security, Malta's President Marie-Louise Coleiro Preca said at the Arraiolos Group meeting on Friday. Thirteen Non-Executive Presidents of the European Union gathered in Malta from Thursday to Friday to debate European inclusiveness with respect to poverty and social injustices of European citizens and refugees. Preca proposed the need to invest in Africa because she believed it will be of benefit to Europe too. "We need to look at Africa as a continent of opportunity. Europeans had colonized Africa and it was, and still is, a continent of opportunity," Preca said.

Friday, 06 October 2017

A new organisation which aims to bring together businesses in Ghana and Ireland has been launched in Accra. Business Ireland Ghana (BIG) is being set up at a time when trade between Ireland and Ghana is growing. The organisation’s members come from the established Irish business community in Ghana, companies in Ireland looking to expand into Ghana, and Ghanaian businesses with an interest in Ireland. Launching Business Ireland Ghana, the Irish Ambassador to Ghana, Nigeria and ECOWAS, Sean Hoy, said that it was an exciting time to launch the network.

Grape growers were given new hope of exporting their produce through the Port of Lüderitz in the near future. The proposition was tabled by NileDutch's commercial director Leo Huisman during a tablegrape pre-harvest season meeting at Aussenkehr, as he outlined that NileDutch can be the solution to using the Lüderitz port. Namibian grapes are currently exported to the Port of Rotterdam in the Netherlands via Cape Town in South Africa, with the produce moved from Namibia to South Africa by truck. Huisman indicated that NileDutch was ready to provide a reliable and quality service that will ensure the grapes are no longer transported to South Africa before shipment, but shipped to Europe straight from Namibia through Lüderitz Port.