Video guest: Josephine Mwangi

June 2017
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EDITO
Friday, 23 June 2017

Brexit encompasses not only a dramatic shift in economic and political ties in Europe but also in Africa where the UK, through its membership of the European Union was able to strengthen rrelationships with several nations on the continent. Following the UK’s Leave vote on June 23rd, African currencies dipped. Stocks and bonds also plunged. Due to their positions as the UK’s largest African markets, Kenya, Nigeria, and South Africa are among the prominent African States to be impacted by the UK’s move out of Europe. A lot of negotiations may have to take place as most of the trade agreements the UK has with African countries were negotiated through the EU. Inevitably, an end will come to some agreements.

Monday, 03 April 2017

Attorney General of Belize, Michael Peyrefitte, represented Belize at the 45th Session of the African, Caribbean, Pacific (ACP) Parliamentary Assembly and the Inter-sessional meetings of the ACP-EU Joint Parliamentary Assembly (JPA) held from the 21st to 24th March 2017 in Brussels, Belgium at the European Parliament.

Representatives from small island developing States (SIDS) from the Caribbean and the Pacific regions are meeting this week in Sydney, Australia, to discuss partnership and resource opportunities for a proposed interregional IAEA technical cooperation project on SIDS. International and regional organizations including the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), the Pacific Community (SPC), the Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP), the European Investment Bank and the US Regional Environmental Office are also attending the meeting.

Cabo Verde (Cape Verde), the Portuguese-speaking African country with the highest level of development and greatest political and economic stability, is preparing a set of measures to further open up the archipelago to foreign investment, according to a recent publication.

The signing of the Treaty of Rome, which established the European Economic Community (EEC) 60 years ago in March 1957, came at a tumultuous time in relations between Europe and Africa. Just weeks earlier Kwame Nkrumah had declared Ghana a republic, an event which was a turning point in the decolonisation of sub-Saharan Africa. Nkrumah remarked that the treaty's inclusion of colonial territories was to neocolonialism what the Berlin Treaty of 1885 had been to colonialism.

Thursday, 30 March 2017

For two days last week, on March 9 and 10, trade ministers from Commonwealth countries met in London to explore ways of boosting intra-Commonwealth trade and investment. It was the first time that the Commonwealth, which is not a trading bloc, but a loose organisation of 52 predominantly former British colonies, would meet to develop a trade agenda.

Wednesday, 29 March 2017

Europeans’ taste for sugar transformed the world. West Indies plantations built from the 17th century to feed demand drove a nexus of commerce, capital and manufacturing that fomented the industrial revolution and modern financial markets.

A European Union-funded project to build a fish market and gear store on La Digue, the third-most populated island of Seychelles, has begun. The project costs $201,000 (2.7 million Seychelles rupees) and will benefit over 60 fishermen on the island.

Tuesday, 28 March 2017

The formulation of projects under the COMESA trade facilitation programme to be financed under the 11 European Development Fund has entered the home stretch. This follows the conclusion of a two day regional workshop for member States to validate the identified projects. The programme has an allocation of 53 million Euros out of a total of 85 Million Euros provided by the European Union in support of COMESA regional integration programmes. The overarching goal of the trade facilitation programme is to make trade transactions easier, quicker, more efficient and less costly, thereby enhancing trade flows.

Britain’s departure from the EU will challenge the bloc’s role as the world leading aid donor, and could see EU aid shrink by up to 3%, according to an authoritative new study by the European Parliament. The EU is the world’s largest aid donor, and the UK in absolute terms, is the second biggest, giving some $18.7bn.