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EDITO
Tuesday, 17 October 2017

Countries from the Indian Ocean Islands and East Africa have come together to develop strategies to tackle illegal fishing and increase accountability in fisheries practices. For two days, representatives from the fishing industry, civil society, governments and fishing administrations from Seychelles, Mauritius, Comoros, Madagascar, Tanzania, Kenya and Mozambique, met on Mahe Island, Seychelles, to discuss the Fisheries Transparency Initiative (FiTI), a global initiative to tackle illegal fishing. African countries are particularly vulnerable to overfishing and depletion of fish stock due to opaque and unregulated fishing practices by both foreign companies as well as local communities. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN (FAO), the fisheries sector in Africa employs more than 12 million people. However, the depletion of fish stock in Africa is a major push factor in the migration of young people to Europe and elsewhere.

Zambia signed trade contracts worth US $100 million with grain traders from eastern Africa on Thursday for the export of 382,640 metric tonnes white maize, soyabeans and other grains. The deals were sealed in Lusaka during a regional Trade Facilitation Forum organised by the Eastern Africa Grain Council (EAGC) in collaboration with Zambia Commodity Exchange (ZAMACE), with support of USAID’s East Africa Trade and Investment Hub and USAID’s Southern Africa Trade and Investment Hub. The forum brought together over 195 sellers and buyers of maize, soya beans, common beans, millet and other grain commodities from, Burundi, Malawi, South Africa, Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

The African development bank (AfDB) and Export Trading Group (ETG) have signed a seven-year US$100mn non-sovereign guaranteed corporate loan to finance agricultural projects across Africa. ETG is an agricultural supply chain manager specialising in African commodities. Proceeds from the loan will go towards the company’s five-year Agricultural Investment Programme, which consists of a range of projects to support agricultural production, storage, transport, processing and logistics in 14 countries in Africa. Speaking to GTR, the company’s global head of treasury Anish Jain says the aim of the programme is to “build a bridge between smallholder farmers and international supply chains, as well as promoting intra-African trade”.

EU foreign ministers met with their African counterparts in Luxembourg to express their commitment to boost their mutual cooperation in preparation for an “ambitious and successful” EU-Africa summit in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, on 29 and 30 November this year. Ministers devoted most of their time together to discuss migration and related policies meant at building more resilient states and societies in sub-Saharan Africa as well as creating job opportunities and alternatives to migration of jobs in smuggling.According to a statement in the “Africa-EU Partnership.

The Cape Verdean government will negotiate the inclusion of three new areas in the partnership agreement it signed a decade ago with the European Union (EU), Cabo Verde’s Foreign Affairs Minister Luís Filipe Tavares said on Wednesday in the Assembly of the Republic in Lisbon. The Cape Verdean minister, who is also the Defence minister said the country wants to extend the partnership agreement to the areas of “investment, growth and job creation; the problem of managing the oceans and maritime economy and institutional reforms, at both a central and local level,” and requested Portugal’s help, as a member of the European Union, for this purpose.