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November 2017
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EDITO
Sunday, 19 November 2017

A Turnkey Fish Processing Plant, constructed by Expotec International Limited of India at a cost of US$7.48 million, with funding from the EXIM Bank of India, has been opened at Elmina in the Central region. The ultra-modern Plant has facilities for descaling, gutting, filleting and packaging of fish and a blast freezer. Other facilities at the plant are a cold storage facility with a capacity of 100 metric tons, an ice block plant, a waste processing component for producing fish and animal feed, clinic, canteen and a crèche. The Plant was inspected by the sector Minister, Mrs Elizabeth Afoley Quaye, accompanied by the Deputy Central Regional Minister, Hon. Thomas Agyei Baffour and the Komenda-Edina-Eguafo-Abirem (KEEA) Municipal Chief Executive, Nana Appiah Korang.

A fresh approach toward utilisation of Cassava and Sorghum flour in bread production has been estimated to save Nigeria as much as $3.5billion every year. The initiative aims at achieving 20 per cent Cassava flour inclusion in bread and it is projected that if the objective is achieved more Cassava growers would empowered as the project would scale up domestic Cassava flour processing to the tune of about 1.2 million metric tons yearly. Also, the project will create 3 million jobs for Nigerians. Nigeria spends about $6 billion annually to import wheat, according to the director, Institute for Agricultural Research (IAR), Zaria, Prof. Ibrahim Umar-Abubakar.

Lack of storage forces farmers to sell their harvest at low prices - but changing that can help them get ahead Surveying his village's stocks of rice, sesame, millet and other food in a storehouse piled high with bags, Amadou Hassane is satisfied - but still a little anxious about the oversupply of baobab leaves. With the rainy season set to start soon in Niger, Hassane and his fellow farmers need buyers for their leaves before the rains come, driving the prices down as fresh leaves sprout and supply surges across the western region of Tillabery. "Life is hard because it is difficult to know when the first rains will come," Hassane told the Thomson Reuters Foundation, holding a list of each farmer's contribution to the village's stockpile.

World leaders must step up and take action in fighting famine to prevent further catastrophic levels of hunger and deaths, said Oxfam. Ahead of the 43rd G7 summit, Oxfam urged world leaders to urgently address the issue of famine, currently affecting four countries at unprecedented levels. "Political failure has led to these crises - political leadership is needed to resolve them... the world's most powerful leaders must now act to prevent a catastrophe happening on their watch," said Oxfam's Executive Director Winnie Byanyima. "If G7 leaders were to travel to any of these four countries, they would see for themselves how life is becoming impossible for so many people: many are already dying in pain, from disease and extreme hunger," she continued.

Africa is undeterred by the failures of the past and the continent is motivated by the incredible energy and talent of its bustling youthful population, according to Acting President Yemi Osinbajo. Mr. Osinbajo spoke Saturday at the G7 Summit special outreach forum on Africa with selected African nations and leaders including Nigeria, Guinea, Tunisia, Niger, Ethiopia and Kenya.According to him, "Africa is confident of the future because we have learnt,... we are investing more in education, insisting on good governance and holding ourselves to account."