Video guest: Josephine Mwangi

October 2017
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EDITO
Sunday, 22 October 2017

The EU delegation to Nigeria said the 6th edition of the European Union-Nigeria Business Forum will place emphasis on the role of young people in Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and agribusiness. Filippo Amato, Counsellor and Head of Trade and Economics Section for the EU delegation to Nigeria and ECOWAS disclosed this during a press conference in Lagos recently. The theme of the conference ‘Youth as an Engine of Broad-based Economic Transformation’ is apt, according to Amato, because it brings attention to a segment of the Nigerian population that has increasingly contributed to the economy of the country. The theme, he added, aligns with the forthcoming Africa Union and EU summit later this year.

In October 2017, European sugar quotas will be abolished. Mauritian sugar will thus face increased competition, given the liberalisation of the world market. Faced with this situation, what are the issues that Mauritian sugar needs to confront? How can it stand out in the market? Let’s take stock: in a month’s time, international competition will be drowning us in sugar. On 30 September, the European sugar regime will come to an end. This means a liberalisation of the market, which will put local and international cane sugar producers in the same boat, as well as beet sugar producers.

Monday, 02 October 2017

Europeans and Mauritanians have today begun a joint commission in Brussels to evaluate the agreement. It is the most important bilateral fisheries agreement for the European Union (EU) from the economic point of view. The Spanish fleet calls for improvements in access to the waters of the North African country. Representatives from the EU and Mauritania will meet until Friday to discuss the fisheries agreement, which proves interesting to the Spanish fleet. The agreement with the African country is the main EU protocol from the economic point of view. It offers licenses for about 56 Spanish ships and concerns the fleet of Andalusia, Galicia and the Canary Islands. In return, the EU pays EUR 57.5 million per year to Mauritania.

The Westmoreland Municipal Corporation Local Government Adaptation to Climate Change Project, valued at some $48.3 million, was officially launched at the Maud McLeod High School in Darliston, Westmoreland on Saturday. The project has received a $39.6 million sponsor from the European Union (EU), while the Westmoreland Municipal Corporation pumped in the balance of $8.7 million. The official launch was attended by European Union Delegation Project Manager for Jamaica, Bahamas, Belize, Turks and Caicos Islands, the Cayman Islands, Vanna Lawrence; Local Government Minister Desmond McKenzie, Westmoreland Eastern MP Luther Buchanan, custos of Westmoreland Rev Hardley Perrin, mayor of Savanna-la-Mar Bertel Moore, among other local representatives.

Italy has turned to its homegrown African entrepreneurs for help in easing the economic pressures driving hundreds of thousands of migrants onto the country's southern shores. In a small initiative billed as symbolically significant, Rome's foreign ministry this week unveiled a programme under which business people with African roots are offered financing to pursue job-creating projects in their countries of origin. Struggling with the financial, logistical and political pressures generated by the influx of more than half a million migrants in the last four years, Italy's centre-left government says Europe must do more to create the kind of opportunities that will keep ambitious young Africans at home.