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EDITO
Tuesday, 17 October 2017

Fruit producers and exporters from Cameroon, the Ivory Coast and Ghana have officially launched AFRUIBANA, an association that will allow fruit producers on the continent to combine their efforts with a view to having their voices heard better in international trade. During a visit to Brussels, Cameroon Trade Minister, Luc Magloire Mbarga Atangana, launched the association to European institutions on Wednesday, July 19. As representative of the African, Caribbean and Pacific Group of States (ACP) during the various Councils of Ministers addressing the banana industry, the minister was lauded for this initiative, which is on a mission to defend the interests of African fruit farming.

The United Kingdom (UK) and members of the Southern African Customs Union (SACU) have agreed to continue discussions to explore ways to ensure that the existing trade arrangement between the UK and SACU currently governed by the EU-SADC EPA will not be disrupted by the UK’s departure from the EU. This effectively means almost all the terms and conditions of SACU’s current trade agreement with the EU – known as the SADC Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) – would be adopted into a new trade arrangement with the UK.

As the federal government continues its advocacy for greater farming,communities in Southern Kaduna have taken the gauntlet and returned to their farms. LEADERSHIP visit to Fadan Kagoma, Jemaa local government in Kaduna State showed the land green as almost every parcel is now cultivated. Most common produce seen on the farms include ginger, groundnuts, maize and Guinea corn. Speaking with Leadership a small holder farmer, Mrs Joy Bulus said this year almost everybody returned to the farm. She said "things have been so hard for everybody that the only option is to return to the farm. As it is ,it is most rewarding and no matter how hard it is one cannot complain of the rewards of farming,because no,matter how hard it is there would always be food and even a little extra for other things"

The historical background of organic agriculture in Tanzania goes back to the world history of agriculture, when people were farming more traditionally. This is to say modern organic farming still has roots from the first half of the 20th century, when there was growing reliance on non-organic methods. After the industrial revolution had introduced synthetic methods, most of which were not well-developed and had serious side effects, an organic movement began in the 1940s, as a reaction to agriculture's growing reliance on synthetic fertilisers and pesticides.

Solomon Islands fish exporters will get a boost under a new project supported and led by the Standards and Trade Development Facility and the Food and Agriculture Organisation or FAO. The FAO said the new fish project will give Solomon Islands fish exporters an added access to the European market and they will stand to benefit from the global partnership on safe trade. The FAO will lead the project which runs until May 2020 with a total budget of over $US500,000.