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EDITO
Friday, 20 October 2017

The government has engaged some France companies to supply combine harvesters, grain driers and shelling equipment as efforts to boost Command Agriculture continue to gather momentum. Agriculture, Mechanisation and Irrigation Development Minister Dr Joseph Made told ZBC News on his return from France that several French companies will enter into partnerships with Zimbabwe to supply combine harvesters. The country will start receiving the combines harvesters and grain driers to boost Command Agriculture Programme starting next year if all goes as per plan. Turning to the current maize crop, Dr Made says a technical sub-committee team for Command Agriculture has already identified combine harvesters which are functional and those which require quick fix ahead of the anticipated bumper harvest.

Kofi Vinyo and Company Limited (KVCL), a Kwatire-based agribusiness firm in the Sunyani West District of Brong-Ahafo region would from next year export and supply four international food processing companies with farm produce in commercial quantities. The firm has signed agreement with the companies - Deon food ingredients and Stel and Van Koot in the Netherlands, Swastik enterprise in India as well as Agribio in Italy. It is expected to export thousands of tons of tiger nuts, maize, ginger, chilli pepper, raw cashew nuts and other vegetables annually. Mr Kofi Vinyo, the Managing Director of KVCL disclosing this to the Ghana News Agency (GNA) at Kwatire said the contracts between his company and the foreign partners were sealed to operate within five years.

When race riots sparked by the shooting of two African migrant workers forced Suleiman Diara to abandon life as a fruit picker in southern Italy he decided to turn his hand to making yoghurt. With 30 euro ($32) borrowed from an Italian charity worker, he and a friend bought 15 litres of milk and tried their luck. Six years on, the two friends and five other migrants are running a small organic farming business that U.N. experts say is an example of sustainable agricultural development, which if replicated could help feed the growing global population. "We named it Barikama, which means 'resilience' as we went through many difficulties to open this company but we never gave up," he said referring to a term used in Bambara, a language spoken in his native Mali. Born in a rural area of southwestern Mali, Diara arrived in Italy on a migrant boat from Libya in 2008 hoping to make enough money to buy his family a cow and a plough.

This Briefing, published by the European Parliamentary Research Service, is designed to provide key facts and figures about the European Parliament, both today - during the current 2014 to 2019 parliamentary term - and in the seven previous terms since direct elections were introduced in June 1979.

Senegalese growers and exporters are increasingly working with European markets. Both by increasing their presence at events like Fruit Logistica and by taking advantage of their unique seasonal position in the world market. ASEPEX, a Senegalese organization has been helping the sector in promoting mangoes, cherry tomatoes, watermelons, limes, sweet potatoes and butter nut squash worldwide. According to Oulimata Fall Sarr, this year they’ve noticed that there are more opportunities for trade in Eastern Europe. Countries like Russia and Poland are looking to diversify their sourcing, as they want to become more independent from Europe and the US due to political and economical unrest.