Video guest: Josephine Mwangi

October 2017
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EDITO
Friday, 20 October 2017

The Cotonou Agreement which governs relations between the European Union and 78 countries from Africa, the Caribbean and the Pacific (ACP) will expire in February 2020. How could the relationship evolve? In the following interview, Stefano Manservisi, Director-General of DEVCO (the Directorate-General for International Cooperation and Development) discusses the shared interests which will guide cooperation and outlines a new basis for partnership founded on regional pillars. Capacity4dev (C4D): The current partnership agreement with the countries of Africa, the Caribbean and the Pacific expires in February 2020.

The Partnership Agreement between the members of the African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) Group of States on the one hand and, on the other hand, the European Union and its Member States, signed in Cotonou on June 2000 is due to expire in February 2020. Negotiations between the parties in order to examine provisions to govern relations subsequently have to start no later than August 2018.

Wednesday, 23 November 2016

Today, the European Commission is setting out a strategic approach for achieving sustainable development in Europe and around the world. A first Communication on the next steps for a sustainable European future explains how the Commission's 10 political priorities contribute to implementing the UN 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and how the EU will meet the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in the future. A second Communication on a new European Consensus on Development proposes a shared vision and framework for development cooperation for the EU and its Member States, aligned with the 2030 Agenda.

The sugar industry is widely recognised as making a significant socio-economic contribution to many African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) Group of States, particularly in generating export earnings and creating employment in rural areas. Nevertheless, it is important to note that many ACP countries have been diversifying to reduce their reliance on the sugar industry. This means that, in some countries, sugar is not as important as it was in the past. The ACP sugar group is diverse. It includes some of the world’s lowest cost sugar producers where production has been growing over time (Malawi, Swaziland, Zambia).

The African Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) Sugar Group says it welcomes the new study on the sugar industry undertaken by the European Union. The “Study on Current and Forecast Market Developments for ACP Sugar Suppliers to the EU Market” sets out a comprehensive assessment of the risks for ACP/EBA sugar producers as a result of changes to the EU sugar regime and it contains a series of helpful tips. The study was undertaken by United Kingdom-based Cardno/LMC International and funded by the European Union. Chairman of the ACP Sugar Group, Samuel Chandler, who is also the Barbados Ambassador to the EU, said the ACP will actively pursue the implementation of the recommendations.