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Wednesday, 04 September 2013

Small-scale agriculture, the key to a secure future in Africa

Developing countries should encourage small scale agriculture in order to improve nutrition, reduce poverty, and enhance development, instead of focusing on the possible advantages of heavily processed food, Kanayo Nwanze, the president of  International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) said at the Forum for Agricultural Research in Africa, which has recently taken place in Accra (Ghana).
IFAD is the UN agency dealing with food production in the developing countries.
This comes after Sergey Brin - the billionaire American businessman who co-founded Google - funded the development of a stem-cell burger cooked up in a western laboratory. The resulting €250,000 burger is billed as a triumph for science and ethics, a way to feed the world. Possibly in 10 years, heavily processed food that has been developed at a phenomenal cost in hi-tech laboratories could be shipped to the world's poorest people in the name of feeding them and protecting their environments, EurActiv reports.
Most of Africa and Asia used to be self-sufficient in food, but over the past 30 years nearly every developing country has become dependent on imports. Nwanze laid the blame for the decline of African agriculture on under-investment as a result of structural adjustment programmes forced on much of the continent by the World Bank. He claims that small farms still have the potential to supply rural markets, as well as Africa's burgeoning urban markets. In addition, it has been demonstrated that growth in agriculture implies a reduction in poverty.

Source: EurActiv

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