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Monday, 03 June 2013

Report on post-2015 development agenda: "ambitious and inspiring"

The final report of the high-level panel appointed by UN secretary general Ban Ki-moon to develop a global vision after the expiry of the millennium development goals (MDGs) in 2015 was evaluated as being “intellectually coherent”, offering a “clear storyline”, and moving on the “debate about poverty and development without losing what's good in the existing agenda”, as reported by The Guardian. It fails however to make clear the actions needed to fulfill the proposed goals, according to the same sources.
For the EU development Commissioner, Andris Piebalgs, the report published on 30th May embodies two crucial strands - setting out a universal agenda to eradicate extreme poverty by 2030, and ensuring in the same time a sustainable development of the planet.
Building on the lessons learned from the current MDGs and taking into account the follow up of the Rio+20 outcome, the Panel makes it clear that the post-2015 framework should address the whole range of root causes of poverty and unsustainable development, including equality, equity, human rights, peace and stability, Piebalgs argues.
The new report suggests moving to a zero target for poverty – no people living in poverty. It also introduces the idea of measuring the poverty rates per nationality, rather than on the global level. Another point where it proves innovative is the exploration of the way discrimination and inequality – including and going beyond gender – may limit opportunities and create poverty. However, it included is no proposal for an inequality goal.  
Similarly, there is no target on global partnerships, even if the goal of keeping global warming within 2C is maintained. Here is whereThe Guardian suggests that an important opportunity was missed - to link the most difficult issues to specific outcomes – which could have pushed for some political traction.
The next UN Special Event on MDGs will take place in September 2013.

Source: European Commission; The Guardian