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Monday, 14 January 2013

Mauritius ratifies Nagoya Protocol

Panama and Mauritius have become the 10th and 11th countries respectively to ratify the Nagoya Protocol on Access to Genetic Resources and the Fair and Equitable Sharing of Benefits Arising from their Utilization to the Convention on Biological Diversity.
Panama deposited its instrument of ratification on 12 December 2012; Mauritius acceded to the Protocol on 17 December 2012. They join the following list of countries that have ratified the ground breaking treaty: Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, India, Jordan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Mexico, Rwanda and the Seychelles. This makes a total of 11 ratifications and it is envisaged that others will follow suit in the coming months.
Opened for signature at the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro in 1992, and entering into force in December 1993, the Convention on Biological Diversity is an international treaty for the conservation of biodiversity, the sustainable use of the components of biodiversity and the equitable sharing of the benefits derived from the use of genetic resources. With 193 Parties, the Convention has near universal participation among countries. The Convention seeks to address all threats to biodiversity and ecosystem services, including threats from climate change, through scientific assessments, the development of tools,
incentives and processes, the transfer of technologies and good practices and the full and active involvement of relevant stakeholders including indigenous and local communities, youth, NGOs, women and the business community.
The Nagoya Protocol significantly advances the objective of the Convention on the fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from the utilization of genetic resources by providing greater legal certainty and transparency for both providers and users of genetic resources. Specific obligations to support compliance with domestic legislation or regulatory requirements of the Party providing genetic resources and contractual obligations reflected in mutually agreed terms are a significant innovation of the Nagoya Protocol.


Source: The Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD)