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Monday, 29 May 2017

UN Chief Underscores the Need to Invest in Africa's Youth

The Group of Seven (G7) leaders has in its 'Taormina Communiqué' underscored that "Africa’s security, stability and sustainable development are high priorities". But it has yet to respond to UN Secretary-General António Guterres' specific call for the need to invest in young people, with stronger investment in technology and relevant education and capacity building in Africa. The two-day G7 summit in Italy, in which the leaders of six other industrial nations – Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Japan and the U.S. also took part, concluded on May 27 in Taormina, a hilltop town on the east coast of Sicily, Italy. Speaking at a session on reinforcing the partnership between the G7 and Africa, the UN Secretary-General noted on the concluding day that the international community has a role in helping the continent adapt as it heads for a new wave of industrialization. African leaders joined the session. They included: President of Niger Mahamandou Issoufou; Kenya's President Uhura Kenyatta; Tunisia’s President Beji Caid Essebsi; Nigeria's Deputy Prime Minister Yemi Osinbajo; and Ethiopia’s Prime Minister Haile Mariam Desalegn. Representatives of African organizations such as the African Union Chairperson Alpha Condé, African Union Commission Chairperson Mahamat Moussa Faki, and President of African Bank for Development Akinwumi Adesina also attended. Beside Guterres, OECD Secretary General Angel Gurría, International Monetary Fund (IMF) Managing Director Christine Lagarde, and World Bank President Jim Yong Kim attended the Summit as well. Emphasizing the need to help Africa adapt as it heads for a new wave of industrialization, the UN Chief told G7 leaders, “Failing to do so might have dramatic consequences for the well-being of the people of Africa; increase fragility, causing massive displacement and risking to boost unemployment, especially for young people.” Africa has the fastest growing youth population in the world, which must be supported with education and training in tomorrow's jobs, he added. “High levels of youth unemployment are not only a tragedy for young people themselves, but can also undermine development and generate frustration and alienation that, in turn, can become a threat to global peace and security,” Guterres cautioned.

Source: Indepth News