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Wednesday, 23 November 2016

EU to reduce aid to Southern Africa after 2020

At the time of decolonisation in the 1960's and 1970's, the then EEC brought together a strange collection of former European colonies in Africa, the Caribbean and the Pacific islands (called the ACP group). It was just at the time that the UK was joining the EEC, and so the group included all the former British, French, Dutch, Belgian and eventually Portuguese ex-colonies. Oddly, it did not include any of the former Spanish colonies. The ACP group was formed in 1975, and since then, the EU has paid substantial amounts of aid through the European development fund, which is replenished by its members every seven years. For Europeans, the payments of aid were essentially 'guilt money' for centuries of slavery and then colonialism, and while they had some real innovations at first, they degenerated, and by the turn of this century, the EU signalled its desire to bring this to an end. But there was always a deeper objective. The Lome Convention and the subsequent Cotonou Agreement were focused on assuring continual access to African raw materials, and trade preferences were offered unilaterally to assure that the sugar and beef and metals kept coming.

Source: allafrica.com