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Wednesday, 09 April 2014

EU fails to transfer technology

According to a study by the US-based think-tank the Center for Global Development, EU members contribute less to global technological development than other developed nations, and have intellectual property policies that are not "development friendly".
European countries conduct most of the world's research and development (R&D) and own most of the globe's intellectual property (IP) rights.  However, European IP policies have become stronger, and countries are "instituting changes that are not likely to be development friendly", the study says.
Developing countries need access to digital technologies to keep pace with the rest of the world. "Cloud computing and nanotechnology are coming in, and these economies will fall further behind if they don't have access to that," Walter Park, co-author of the study and professor of economics at the US-based American University, says.
In Park’s opinion, Europe has a formal obligation to support the technological development of the developing world. The Trade Related Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) agreement requires developed country members of the WTO to help transferring technologies to the developing world.
But Park says policymakers in the EU are influenced by the strong lobbying forces of IP owners rather than those who argue that increased access is better to favor innovation.
Source: AllAfrica