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Wednesday, 03 May 2017

Hazera backs African agri development

Vegetable seed specialist Hazera has announced that it has opted to support agricultural development in Africa, providing high quality seeds and expertise to support people improving their living conditions. Hazera utlined several examples of where it has made a difference on the continetn. In Ethiopia, a development project that began with the adoption of one village is expanding now to 13 additional villages, while another project is supported in Holeta, where the Roseland foundation is developing the community through education and agriculture. More broadly, Hazera is training farmers all over Africa and is introducing vegetable varieties that can bring African farms to healthy profit. The Ethiopian villages project was initiated and accompanied by Hazera together with its local distributor, Green Life. The challenge was to make local farmers more professional, so that they could better support their families. The project began in the small village of Gedenser, in eastern Ethiopia. Its agricultural potential called for a long-term investment, requiring the villagers to commit themselves to study and work in order to learn agriculture and make a living from it. Hazera contributed seeds to the project for three basic crops: onions, tomatoes and peppers. Hazera representatives brought together all the families involved, helped teach them to use organic animal manure for soil fertilisation and provided agricultural equipment and supplies. After about a year, the villagers began to make a living from their produce. The project drew the attention of senior officials from Ethiopia’s Ministry of Agriculture and from 2017 the project will be expanding to 13 more villages in Ethiopia. The Roseland Academy initially started as a school located in Holeta Town, near Addis Abeba. Besides ensuring education and taking care of the children, the foundation also wants to improve life standard by developing vegetable cultivation. Harvested products are used for healthy meals prepared by the children and their mothers. By now, production is even exceeding the needs. The surplus vegetables, such as tomato, cauliflower, onion, cucumber and pepper, are sold on the local market, generating income for the community that is re-invested in new development projects.

Source: Fruitnet