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CTA - Brussels Office Newsletter
Subject: CTA - Brussels Office Newsletter
Send date: 2013-02-01 16:24:13
Issue #: 169
Content:
Bulletin CTA

1

This weblog shares information on key ACP-EU programmes and events
from Brussels relevant to agriculture and rural development in ACP countries.


Date : 01/02/2013
CTA Brussels Newsletter

 

Main events in the week
  1. Main Events for the Week 03/02/2013 – 10/02/2013
  2. Video Guest: Ines Escudero Sanchez, Export Helpdesk, EC
  3. Next Brussels Development Briefing
  4. CTA recruits a Research Assistant
  5. UK MPs: Aid money to go through NGOs, not the EU
  6. Logo on wood to track illegal products from Cameroon
  7. Bees protection: EU wants a two-year pesticide ban
  8. Mauritian fishermen accuse EU of depleting fish resources
  9. Advancements in the EU-Morocco fisheries agreement
  10. Europe, SA say ‘cheese’ after dispute over export subsidies
  11. South Africa and EU deal a blow for Kenya
  12. EU : strategy against maritime piracy
  13. ACP hails EP vote extending EU sugar quotas
  14. CE: Agreement on CFP by June 2013
  15. EU Presidency to focus on agreement on CAP reform
  16. Attacks on EAS budget support policy
  17. Role of smallholders emphasized in World Economic Forum's report
  18. Large-scale UK anti-hunger campaign 'If'
  19. Human rights’ integration into Development
  20. World Bank, MEPs call for climate-oriented EU budget
  21. EU carbon market in 'freefall' after backloading vote
  22. African Union Summit: reaffirmed ties with EU
  23. EU Consumers want clearer food origin labelling


  1. Main Events for the Week 03/02/2013 – 10/02/2013
    2013-02-01
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade, Regional Fisheries, ACP-EU Policy, Food Policy, Rural development, Archive, Environment

    Council of the EU:
    - 4 February: Meeting of General Affairs Council (GAC)
    - 5-6 February: COREPER I
    - 5 February: COREPER II
    - 7-8 February: European Council

    European Parliament:
    - 4-7 February: European Parliament Plenary
    - 4-7 February: European Parliament committee meetings

    ACP Group:
    - 4 February: S/C on Sustainable Development
    - 5 February: 5th Steering Committee Meeting of the ACP Fish2 Programme
    - 8 February: S/C on Political, Social, Humanitarian and Cultural Affairs

    You can also read our newspaper “CTA Brussels Daily” (fed by our Twitter account), follow our new Facebook group CTABrussels and our Twitter account CTABrussels to receive up-to-date information on EU-ACP events.




  2. Video Guest: Ines Escudero Sanchez, Export Helpdesk, EC
    2013-02-01
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade

    If you are a producer in an ACP country and you want to export your products to the EU you might want to know that there exists a free online service from the European Commission- The Export Helpdesk- which can give you valuable information on:
    - which are the requirements applying in EU for your product
    - the maximum residual levels of pesticides
    - traceability
    - what should be on the label
    - how to market the coffee.
    - import tariffs for coffee, and the preferential arrangement applying
    - trade flows (ex: which countries in Europe are buying already your product)
    - authorities and international organizations in trade operations and trade promotion

    Watch the CTA Brussels video with Ines Escudero Sanchez, Export Helpdesk coordinator to find out more about the this service.

    Topics:
    - The Export Helpdesk service description
    - The trends in the data usage
    - Additional activities to support export to the EU

    The Export Helpdesk is a free online service, offered by the Directorate General for Trade, to inform business in developing countries on how to export to the European Union. It aims to facilitate market access in particular for developing countries to the European Union.


    Link Watch the Video
    Link Find out more about the Export Helpdesk
    Link Export Helpdesk for developing countries


  3. Next Brussels Development Briefing
    2013-02-01
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Food Security

    The 30th Brussels Development Briefing will take place on 4th March 2013 (8h30-13h00) on the important issue of Agricultural resilience in the face of crisis and shocks, highlighting proven approaches and successes in key areas of agriculture and rural development of ACP countries and other parts of the world.
    We will organise it in in collaboration with the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) based in Washington.
    Confirmed speakers include: Sir Gordon Conway, Professor of International Development, Imperial College London, Luca Alinovi, Country Chief FAO, Somalia, IFPRI DG, Chris Reij, SLM specialist, Senior Fellow World Resources Institute, CIMMYT, Action Aid, Regional African Farmers Organisations, WFP.

    For registrations: fill the form on http://brusselsbriefings.net/, or send an email to boto@cta.int


    Link Read more
    Link Find out more about the Brussels Briefings
    Link Find out more about past briefings


  4. CTA recruits a Research Assistant
    2013-02-01

    The CTA is recruiting for the Brussels Office a trainee (Junior Research Assistant). It is open to ACP and EU nationals. A one six month’s contract will be offered from 1st March 2013. This contract can be renewed once for a maximum of 6 months. Read details on requirements and how to apply in the note attached.


    Link Job_description_Research_Assistant_1.pdf

  5. UK MPs: Aid money to go through NGOs, not the EU
    2013-02-01
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Archive, Aid effectiveness

    UK MPs argue that the 40% of the official development assistance (ODA) budget for 2012, which is channeled through international organizations as the World Bank and the EU, might not have the expected results, given the lack of effectiveness of the institutions in allocating the money. Instead, they asked the Department for International Development (DfID) to cut red tape and make it easier for NGOs and civil society groups to receive and make use of such funds.
    Moreover, British MPs  said on Thursday 31 January that the expected growth of the official development assistance (ODA) budget for 2012, to reach the UN target of 0.7% of GNI is putting pressure on the Department for International Development (DfID) to make poor spending decisions.
    "The department should be prepared to miss aid targets where there are delays or cancellations to its planned projects and it does not have good value alternatives.", Malcolm Bruce, chair of the international development committee said.
    The MPs discussed also about setting up a development bank, which would not put pressure on the DfID to spend the money by the end of the year.


    Source: The Guardian


    Link Read more
    Link Auditors raise doubts about EU road aid to Africa
    Link EU aid programme ‘performs poorly’


  6. Logo on wood to track illegal products from Cameroon
    2013-02-01
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade, Environment

    Cameron will introduce a logotype label affixed on wood products destined for the European Markets from the country.
    “It will consist in putting on each wood that leaves Cameroon a kind of a stamp, FLEGET-Cameroun,” according to Samuel EbiaNdongo, project coordinator. The stamp is aimed to, according to authorities, ensure a sustainable management of the country’s forest and the effective eradication of illegal logging in the country.
    This action shows compliance with the legislation of the bilateral agreements voluntary scheme signed between Cameroon and the EU to ensure that only legally harvested timber is imported into the EU. This agreement, called also VAP is a key part of the Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade Support Program for African, Caribbean and Pacific countries (ACP-FLEGT Support Program).
    The European Union has other six VPAs with Indonesia, Central Africa Republic, Cameroon, the Republic of Congo,  Ghana, and Liberia. These agreements include commitments to halt trade in illegal timber, notably with a license scheme to verify the legality of timber exported to the EU, and
    ACP-FLEGT Support Program is a collaborative effort among the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the European Commission and the African, Caribbean and Pacific Group of States (ACP) to address forest law enforcement, governance and trade issues in ACP member countries.
    Source: businessincameroon.com, European Commisison


    Link Read more
    Link FAO, EU fight illegal logging in Ghana
    Link EU and Liberia to ensure legal origin of imported wood products


  7. Bees protection: EU wants a two-year pesticide ban
    2013-02-01
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Food Policy

    The EU has launched a rescue plan for Europe’s dwindling honeybee colonies: a 24-month ban on three widely-used neonicitinoid pesticides that the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) says pose “high acute risks” to pollinators.
    "We are requesting that member states suspend for two years the use of these [neonicitonoid] pesticides on seeds, granular atom sprays and for crops that attract bees – sunflower, maize, rape and cotton,” a spokesman for the EU health commissioner, Tonio Borg, told a press conference on Thursday (31 January).
    The EU's proposals are based on an EFSA finding that the three seed-coating treatments – clothianidin, imidacloprid and thiamethoxam – could potentially harm bees where they are attracted to crops, or exposed to pesticide dust or guttation fluid.
    Around 16% of Europe’s honeybee colonies disappeared between 1985 and 2005 – with greater losses recorded in England, the Czech Republic, Germany and Sweden. Insects such as honey bees and wild bees help pollinate around 84% of Europe’s 264 crop species and 4,000 vegetable varieties, contributing an estimated €22 billion to the EU's economy, STEP says.
    But EU officials privately complain of “a kind of doubletalk” by Spain and other countries at the Agricultural Council slowing action behind the scenes. “Some member states say, ‘oh we like honeybees a lot’, but when it comes to doing something publicly, it’s suddenly difficult,” one source added. Much will now depend on the attitude of EU member states to the proposed ban. Following a meeting of the bloc's agricultural ministers on 28 January, Commissioner Borg was optimist, declaring that it was time for “swift and decisive action”.
    At the EU level, a precautionary principle in the Union’s founding treaty obliges it to act where sufficient doubt about environmental or health risks is scientifically established, as the EFSA report has now done to the EU’s satisfaction.


    Source: Euractiv  


    Link Read more
    Link EFSA identifies risks to bees from neonicotinoids
    Link MEPs call for better bee protection


  8. Mauritian fishermen accuse EU of depleting fish resources
    2013-02-01
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Regional Fisheries

    Mauritian fishermen are reported to be displeased that the European Union (EU) vessels are depleting their fish resources.  
    The EU fishing trawlers, mainly from Spain, France and Portugal, operating under the Fisheries Partnership Agreement (FPA) signed in 2012 between Mauritius and the EU are said to be scouring the sea around Mauritius are. This leads local fishermen need to go further out in the sea to be able to catch fish.
    The Fisheries Partnership Agreement (FPA) authorizes 86 vessels to capture 5500 tons of fish a year for a period of six years. The EU has paid an annual fee of €660.000 ($863, 127) to Port Louis.
    “Fish that was abundant in the lagoons around the island in the past have now disappeared because of over-fishing and also because of pollution as evidenced by the official statistics,” AA says in a recently-released report.
    Both economists and marine scientists are yet to come to terms with the core reason why Mauritius has signed such an agreement with the EU when countries like Morocco and Senegal have refused to do so. Mauritius has been resisting the agreement for the last seven years but finally agreed to sign it in late 2012.
    Now, mauritian Fisheries Minister, Nicolas Von Mally, is concerned by the fate of the 12000 fishermen earning a living from the tuna canneries of the island where the fish are offloaded by the EU vessels at the port in Port-Louis for processing. About 95 percent of the production from the 90 000 tons of raw tuna is exported to European markets.
    Mauritus claims an Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of 1.9 million km2, including the water around Chagos Archipelago. The lagoon area around the main island of Mauritius is 243 km2.


    Source: ventures-africa.com


    Link Read more
    Link Fisheries Partnership Agreement between the EU and Mauritius
    Link CE: Agreement on CFP by June 2013


  9. Advancements in the EU-Morocco fisheries agreement
    2013-02-01
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Regional Fisheries

    The negotiations on a new fisheries agreement between the European Union (EU) and Morocco "have advanced well in the definitions of technical conditions, and may be closed this week.”, sayed the Spanish Minister of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Miguel Arias Cañete at the meeting of the Council of Ministers for Agriculture and Fisheries of the EU, which took place on Monday 28 January in Brussels.
    "We are trying to improve some technical aspects of fishing opportunities," acknowledged the minister.
    This statement comes after a third round of negotiations on the new protocol of the Fisheries Agreement between EU and Morocco took place in Rabat, the capital of Marocco, on 15 and 16 January. Following two rounds dealing mostly with the technical conditions that would apply to the EU fleet under the new protocol, the discussions dealt with financial aspects as well as with political issues.
    At this stage, the parties agreed on an increase of fishing opportunities, and, as underlined by the Spanish minister,  a revision of technical conditions for certain fishing categories. The envisaged financial support of fishing sector in regard with programming, implementation and reporting conditions was also part of the discussions.
    Intensive discussion were held concerning the Moroccan government pretentions of further receiving EUR 36 million annually as compensation. In response, the EU demanded  more fishing rights required to make the deal profitable and solve one of the weaknesses of the previous one, which was "the under-utilization of several categories, which meant that many boats did not even use their licenses ".
    The current Fisheries Partnership Agreement between the EU and Morocco entered into force on 28 February 2007. The first Protocol to this Agreement ran until 27 February 2011 and provided for a financial contribution of 36 million € out of which 13.5 million € was dedicated to the support of the fisheries policy of Morocco. Vessels from 11 EU Member States could obtain fishing authorisations from Morocco under the Agreement and this Protocol.


    Source: Fish Information & Services (FIS), European Commission


    Link Read more
    Link EU discussions with Morocco for a new protocol
    Link Slow progress for fisheries agreement


  10. Europe, SA say ‘cheese’ after dispute over export subsidies
    2013-01-31
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Food Policy, ACP-EU Trade

    THE tit-for-tat cheese disagreement between South Africa and the European Union (EU) — which tried to subsidise exports of gouda, cheddar and processed cheese in contravention of a deal with South Africa — has been resolved.
    The dispute has plagued implementation of the South Africa-EU trade and development co-operation agreement signed in November 1999.
    After customs officials detected the subsidies, South Africa imposed tariff duties and quotas on the EU’s cheese — also in contravention of the agreement.
    Parliament’s trade and industry committee ratified another agreement on Tuesday 29 January, which put an end to these tit-for-tat measures. After "extensive" bilateral discussions, the EU made a commitment to cease its subsidisation of cheese exports to South Africa and, in turn, South Africa committed to remove the tariff duties. This will result in a R76m reduction of customs duty and a R10m reduction in VAT collections over a 12-month period
    The dispute over preferential market access for European cheese into South Africa had been a source of tension since the coming into force of the trade agreement in May 2004. The agreement prohibited the use of what department director-general Lionel October said were "very generous" export subsidies for EU cheese, which was already subsidised in terms of its Common Agricultural Policy.
    The EU reneged on this clause of the agreement and, to protect its industry, South Africa responded by imposing duties on all EU cheese imports that were not accompanied by a declaration confirming that the product had not received export subsidies.
    Another source of concern to South Africa was that some cheese lines that it wanted to export to the EU were included on the region’s list of "excluded" products, which could not to be liberalised.
    The Trade, Development and Co-operation Agreement has established a free trade area that covers 90% of bilateral trade between the EU and South Africa.


    Source: bdlive.co.za


    Link Read more
    Link Trade Deal Between U.S.-Europe May Pick Up Steam
    Link No EU permit for South African dairy products


  11. South Africa and EU deal a blow for Kenya
    2013-01-30
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Policy, ACP-EU Trade

    Kenya’s negations for the Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) with the European Union present a new hurdle, as the Union is wary that South Africa could use Kenya as a transit point for goods that have restricted entry into its market.
    “In the trade agreement between EU and South Africa, some of the items are classified as ‘sensitive’ and are not allowed to EU without duties. On the other hand, South Africa has trade ties with Kenya that allow these goods in the country. The EU is wary that South Africa could use Kenya as transit for goods to that market hence violating their trade agreement,” said Mr Joseah Rotich, a technical expert in the Ministry of Trade. Mr Rotich said the issue will have to be dealt with before an economic partnership agreement is signed with the EU-  “We are negotiating and expect to solve the matter through regional integration and entering tripartite agreements,” he said.
    On the other hand, trade between Kenya and South Africa, mainly in raw materials, has been growing. According to 2012 Economic Survey, Kenya’s imports from South Africa have almost doubled in 2011, compared to 2007.
    Last week, South African officials were in Kenya seeking better bilateral trade ties with Nairobi.
    Experts have called for the signing of the economic partnership agreement between Kenya and EU to be in sync with the East African regional integration to avert disrupting business. There are concerns that if Kenya, which is particularly under pressure to sign EPAs goes it alone, it could upset the East Africa common market protocol and customs union.
    Kenya is in a different trade band from its counterparts in the trade bloc as it is considered a developing country while others are ranked in the least developed countries category. The country’s current trade with EU is carried out under the Generalised System of Preferences agreements that restrict some items while the other countries operate under the Everything -But -Arms tier that enables them to export all that meets EU market standards.
    Four Eastern and Southern African states (ESA) Mauritius, Madagascar, Seychelles and Zimbabwe have already concluded an EPA with the EU, which was endorsed by the EP middle of January.


    Source: Bilaterals.org


    Link Read more
    Link EP backs EU’s EPA with Africa
    Link Zambia: ‘Prickly’ issues to be solved before signing EPAs


  12. EU : strategy against maritime piracy
    2013-01-30
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Regional Fisheries

    In her key-note speech at the event organised by the European Economic and Social Committee (EESC) for the presentation of its opinion "Maritime piracy: strengthening the EU response" on Thursday 24 January, Commissioner Damanaki Commissioner Damanaki indicated that the European Commission was currently drafting a new "EU security strategy for the global maritime domain".
    The EU, which controls 40% of world shipping, cannot afford any escalation of piracy, said the EESC. "If the wave of piracy goes unchecked, the whole supply chain of goods and energy risks being disrupted," said Stéphane Buffetaut, president of the EESC Section for Transport, Energy, Infrastructure and Information Society.
    The strategy’s first step would be to generate "real-time situational awareness of all activities at sea". By interlinking civilian and military communities, it would result in better cross-border information sharing, which in turn would facilitate decision-making and improve maritime governance.
    Secondly, while backing the UN decision to extend the mandate of the European Union Naval Force Somalia (EU-NAVFOR-ATALANTA) until 2014, the EESC said its geographical scope must be broadened to include West Africa as well. "The current naval presence in the Indian Ocean can be likened to patrolling an area the size of Europe with 20 police cars," said Dr Bredima.         
    Also, military measures should go hand in hand with decisive action aimed at disrupting the pirates' financial networks. The first step should be better tracking of financial flows and the setting up of an EU blacklist of institutions involved in laundering money from piracy. Some of the ransom money that may have been deposited in EU banks must be traced and confiscated, said the EESC.  
    Thirdly, member States could make use of qualified private armed guards on board vulnerable ships, with the proviso that the use of private forces be subjected to stringent EU and international conditions.
    Finally, legislation in EU countries must be amended to re-criminalise piracy and create a consistent legal framework for prosecuting pirates.


    Source: EESC


    Link Read more
    Link EU position on maritime piracy
    Link The speech of Commissioner Maria Damanaki


  13. ACP hails EP vote extending EU sugar quotas
    2013-01-30
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade, Rural development, ACP-EU Policy

    The ACP Group is satisfied with the vote in the European Parliament’s Committee on Agriculture and Rural Development on 23 January 2013 last week, which supports the extension of the current sugar quota provisions until 30 September 2020.  According to ACP, the extension of sugar quotas will help to ensure fair, stable and reasonable remunerative EU sugar market prices to ACP and LDC exporters under the current economic agreements (Economic Partnership Agreements, respectively the Everything But Arms Initiative for LDCs).
    Several ACP/LDC suppliers wish to continue to export raw cane sugar for refining. The ACP is therefore also calling for conditions which can support a viable EU sugar refining industry to provide a dedicated entry to the EU market and to maintain a plurality of potential buyers for EPA/EBA sugar. Thus, the ACP does not favor the reinstatement of beet quotas and is opposed to any allowance of duty free imports from other third parties, as measure to protect ACP and LDCs preferential status.
    The coherence between various EU policies- as  trade, development and agriculture- is a core condition of the Cotonou Partnership Agreement and  the EPA’s between the ACP and the EU and is it from this perspective that the ACP group sees as is crucial the need that EU institutions work to sustain the beet sugar quota arrangements for sugar until 2020.
    The Committee backed the extension of protections for sugar producers and grape growers, defying Commission proposals to remove market support and eventually liberalise all agricultural markets. The quota system, dating to 1968, provides farmers a guaranteed minimum price aimed at ensuring stable supplies.


    Source: ACP


    Link Read more
    Link MEPs back a less green, more 'flexible' CAP
    Link ACP countries draw the line on EU sugar reforms


  14. CE: Agreement on CFP by June 2013
    2013-01-30
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Regional Fisheries

    At the last Council meeting on Agriculture and Fisheries held in Brussels on Monday 28 January 2013, there was a large support amongst member states reaching a political agreement on the common fisheries policy (CFP) reform package by the end of June 2013.
    Moreover, many delegations favored a gradual approach for implementing the landing obligation and discards ban according to the specificities of the regions or the fisheries involved.
    The majorities of the member states also pointed out a need for the simplification of the European maritime and fisheries fund (EMFF)
    However, some members want to keep national historic rate of expenses in the European fisheries fund (EFF), while other would prefer to set up new criteria. There was also a call for a specific financing of aquaculture activities, and support for small-scale fisheries. A new fund, EMFF is aimed to finance projects that create new jobs and improve quality of life along European coasts. It will replace the existing European Fisheries Fund (EFF) and a number of other instruments. The proposed envelope amounts to € 6.5 billion for the period 2014 to 2020.
    According to the European Commission, Europe’s fisheries policy is in urgent need of reform. Vessels are catching more fish than can be safely reproduced, thus exhausting individual fish stocks and threatening the marine ecosystem. Many stocks are overfished: 80% of Mediterranean stocks and 47 % of Atlantic stocks.
    This first Council under Irish Presidency discussed the Common Fisheries Policy Reform Package, presented by the Commission in July 2011. In particular, the discussion focused on setting a calendar for the next steps. More
    The objective of the reformed fisheries policy is to end overfishing and make fishing sustainable - environmentally, economically and socially.

    Source: Council of the European Union


    Link Read more
    Link CFP reform package
    Link CFP reform – the discard ban


  15. EU Presidency to focus on agreement on CAP reform
    2013-01-30
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Food Policy

    At the last Council of the EU meeting on Agriculture and Fisheries held in Brussels on Monday 28 January 2013, the Presidency presented its work programme and priorities on agriculture and a roadmap for common agricultural policy (CAP) reform to the Council.
    During this semester, the Presidency will focus its action on securing interinstitutional political
    agreement on the reform of the CAP by the end of June this year. Thus, the Presidency expects to achieve a comprehensive Council position by end of March 2013.
    At the same time, the Presidency will continue to work with the European Parliament on the
    alignment of the current agriculture legal framework with the provisions of the Treaty of Lisbon.
    Most of the delegations endorsed the tight schedule proposed by the Presidency for the CAP reform, given that the new policy is supposed to come into force starting 2014.
    However, the EU countries underlined that any advancement on the CAP reform is linked to an agreement at the next European summit on the EU budget (Multi-annual financial framework (MFF) 2014-2020), to take place in the second week of February.

    Source: Council of the European Union


    Link Read more
    Link MEPs back a less green, more 'flexible' CAP
    Link Irish minister : CAP talks should not be delayed


  16. Attacks on EAS budget support policy
    2013-01-29
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Aid effectiveness

    The European External Action Service (EAS) was criticized for offering financial support from its own budget to overseas aid.
    A report drafted by the European court of auditors describes the budget support as a "particularly problematic area". Followingly, an MEP - Derk Jan Eppink- joined the critic pointing out that funds offered to Tunisia and Egypt (€60m, respectively €100m) in the form of budget support from the European neighbourhood policy in 2009 ”should never have been given”.
    Additionally, concern has been voiced also about the quality of the cooperation between the EAS and DEVCO (Development and Cooperation – EuropeAid  Directorate–General)- “I am also very worried that there might be insufficient oversight of the management practices within EAS delegations across the world which have given rise to reports of significant mistakes in procurement procedures and taxation management”, MEP Ryszard Czarnecki, rapporteur for the report commented.
    However, two weeks after these attacks Oxfam's EU policy expert, Catherine Olier, defendsthe budget support, describing it as a "well-established aid financing modality" , having "proved efficient for poverty eradication".
    Olier argues, that the budget support has, for example, contributed "significantly" to a decline in poverty in Tunisia from 6.2 % in 1995 to 3.8 %  ten years later. Oxfam goes on by underlining the comparative advantage of these money: "Compared to aid earmarked for projects, it is shown to improve public services like health and education by improving public expenditure. Also, when these services are paid for out of general budget, they are more likely to continue when aid is withdrawn than those which have a separate funding stream. Budget support is an effective tool to improve financial management and build strong and accountable states."

    Source: The Parliament


    Link Read more
    Link Oxfam in defence of EU budget support
    Link How the Commission provides budget support


  17. Role of smallholders emphasized in World Economic Forum's report
    2013-01-28
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Rural development, Food Security

    The World Economic Forum's report, ‘Achieving the New Vision for Agriculture: New Models for Action’ focuses and acknowledges the importance of around 500 million smallholders worldwide, who account for 97% of total global agricultural holdings, and produce food for almost 70% of the world's population.
    The report was launched on the occasion of the World Economic Forum Annual Meeting, organized between 23-27 Jnauary in Davos, Switzerland.
    The role of smallholders for global food security and environmental sustainability is highlighted. Furthermore, it suggests that they can included in the transformation of agriculture, through regional and national partnerships with the private sector, governments and the civil society.
    However, critics call for caution in the approach, voicing their doubts whether smallholders can actually have a voice in front of large-scale concerns that drive the initiative, and expressing concerns over a too market-based approaches on food security and poverty reduction.

    Source: The Guardian


    Link Read more
    Link Read the report
    Link Find out more about the The World Economic Forum


  18. Large-scale UK anti-hunger campaign 'If'
    2013-01-28
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Archive, Food Security

    A coalition of 100 organization launched on Wednesday 23 January a campaign to lobby  UK’s prime-minister David Cameroon, to use the country’s presidency of the G8, and ahead of the group’s  meeting in June, to push action against global hunger.
    The 'Enough food for everyone If' campaign brings global food security on the public agenda, being the largest coalition of its kind since the UK-grounded 'Make Poverty History' campaign which took place in 2005 (the last time Britain held the G8 presidency).
    One of the focus of the campaign rests on land and ‘land- grabbing’ , tax avoidance, and the lack of transparency of investments in developing countries.
    The coalition counts as members among others Oxfam, Save the Children, One, Christian Aid and Tearfund.

    Source: The Guardian


    Link Read more
    Link Improve soil for global food security
    Link Brussels Briefing: Nutrition Security


  19. Human rights’ integration into Development
    2013-01-28
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Archive

    Human right represent an important part of the of the Agenda for Change of EU Development policy, launched by the European Commission in 2011. Delving into the topics, the conference organized by the Development and Cooperation – EuropeAid DG InfoPoint in Brussels on Monday 28 discussed the way the expansion of human rights into development work affects organizational and operational processes.
    Recent research upon the integration of human rights highlights several main entries to the theory of change in Development policy, as the role of the state, of the law, and transnational and international cooperation. These casualties are important to be kept in mind when international development agencies consider the causalities of their work.
    The discussion also touched upon sensitive topics in planning development, as: mainstreaming vs. targeting, upstream vs. downstream, state vs. civil society.


    Source: CTA Brussels.


    Link Read more
    Link EU: Human rights and democracy
    Link Louis Michel opposes discrimination


  20. World Bank, MEPs call for climate-oriented EU budget
    2013-01-28
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Environment

    Governments must rally to make sure the EU's next long-term budget is geared towards curbing climate change, said an envoy from the World Bank and European lawmakers.
    The World Bank envoy laid out a series of large-scale policy measures governments needed to implement to curb global warming, including ramping up the move away from dependence on fossil fuels, low-carbon systems in cities, and a “truly robust” carbon market.
    The talk came hours after lawmakers voted down a proposal to support the EU’s carbon market, which dropped to a record low, prompting warnings that governments need to do more to lower CO2 emissions.
    The group said governments’ pursuit of further climate-oriented measures could suffer as ministers called for cuts to the multi-annual financial framework, the EU’s long-term budget. The European Commission has proposed that 20% of the MFF be spent on climate-relevant policy measures.
    In line with the wishes of member states, in his latest EU budget proposal Council President Herman Van Rompuy has cut by 10% the budget for Official Development Assistance, much of which is geared towards combating global emissions. “The budget should not come at the cost of the neediest in our world”, commented British Labour MEP Michael Cashman.
    The next European summit on the EU's long-term budget (2014-2020) will take place from 7 to 8 of January 2013 in Brussels.


    Source: Euractiv


    Link Read more
    Link EU carbon market in 'freefall' after backloading vote
    Link World Bank: “+4°C world” by 2100


  21. EU carbon market in 'freefall' after backloading vote
    2013-01-28
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Environment

    EU carbon prices briefly slid 40% to a record low (€2.81 a metric tone) on Thursday (24 January)  after a vote in the European Parliament's energy and industry committee opposing a scheme known as "backloading" - or supporting prices by extracting allowances from the market and reinjecting them later. This raises concerns that prices could hit zero.
    "This should be the final wake-up call both to governments and the European Parliament," EU Climate Commissioner Connie Hedegaard said.
    The €110-billion scheme is core to Europe's efforts to prompt utilities and industry to go green but carbon prices are far too low to provide that incentive. Analysts say carbon prices need to be at least €20 to make utilities switch to lower carbon energy generation. Launched in 2005, the scheme is now in its third trading phase and is legislated to run until at least 2020, which means it cannot be dismantled even if prices crash to zero.
    Thursday's vote is part of a long EU process. Although not binding, it is the latest sign of the difficulty the EU is having in reaching agreement on how to intervene in the carbon market.A vote in the environment committee, expected next month, as well as another in a committee of representatives of member states, are far more decisive.
    Many doubt the Commission's proposal will be passed, meaning more ambitious reform plans might not happen for years, leaving the market limping along and Europe's ambitions to lead the world fight against rising carbon emissions severely dented.
    So far, coal-intensive Poland is opposed, Britain wants a more ambitious plan and Germany, the EU's most influential member, is undecided.


    Source: Euractiv


    Link Read more
    Link EU must act as carbon prices hit record low
    Link EU Carbon plan needs German backing


  22. African Union Summit: reaffirmed ties with EU
    2013-01-28
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Policy

    Commissioner for development, Andris Piebalgs, represents the European Union at the African Union Summit, which takes place in Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) on 27-28 January under the main theme of "Pan-Africanism and African Renaissance".
    On this occasion, Commissioner Piebalgs will discuss with the recently-elected Chairperson of the African Union Commission, Dlamini-Zuma the state of play of the Joint Africa-EU Strategy (JAES) as well as the new African Union Commission priorities in key areas such as peace and security, as well as the empowerment of women.
    European Commissioner Andris Piebalgs will then also attend the international donors conference on Mali to take place in Addis Ababa (Ethiopia) on the 29th of January.


    Source: European Commission


    Link Read more
    Link Ascending Africa Summit in Brussels
    Link More about the Joint Africa-EU Strategy


  23. EU Consumers want clearer food origin labelling
    2013-01-28
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Food Security, Food Policy

    The origin country of products is a key criteria for EU consumers when buying food, according to a survey by the European Consumer Organisation (BEUC).
    In a new BEUC member research, 70% of the respondents said the origin is an important factor when buying food. "Consumers want more and more to know where their food comes from, but the state of play is quite confusing at the moment," Ruth Veale, head of BEUC's Food, Health, Environment and Safety Department said.
    The survey also found that a clear majority of shoppers want to know the specific country their food comes from. "Most consumers are interested in the origin because they relate this to the quality and the safety of the food," said Camille Perrin, food policy officer at BEUC, adding that most respondents also said they wish to support local farming, economy or companies.
    Meat is the product on which most consumers said they wanted to know the country origin. There's also a strong interest in knowing the origin country of fruit and vegetables, fish, milk and diary products where 70-90% of the consumers want to see origin labelling.
    In the EU, the origin must always be labelled for olive oil, fish (unless it's canned or prepared), beef, fresh or frozen poultry of non-EU origin, wine, most fresh fruit and vegetables, honey and eggs. For all other foods, origin labelling is only voluntary. The new EU food labelling legislation which will apply from December 2014 will include origin labelling of fresh meat from pigs, sheep, goats and poultry;
    BEUC recommended that origin labelling should become mandatory for all meats, milk, unprocessed foods, single-ingredient foods such as flour and sugar and ingredients that represent more than 50% of a food.


    Source: Euractiv, European Commission


    Link Read more
    Link EU rules on labelling after 2014
    Link More on food labelling in the EU



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Ms Isolina BOTO
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Editor: Cristina Dobos (dobos@cta.int)

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