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[CTA - Brussels Office Newsletter N° 345 ]
Subject: [CTA - Brussels Office Newsletter N° 345 ]
Send date: 2012-11-23 11:14:50
Issue #: 162
Content:
Bulletin CTA
1

 

This weblog shares information on key ACP-EU programmes and events
from Brussels relevant to agriculture and rural development in ACP countries.


Date : [23/11/2012]
CTA Brussels Newsletter

 

Main events in the week
  1. Our Video Guest: Arslan Aslihan, FAO
  2. Main Events for the Week 26/11/2012 – 02/12/2012
  3. Fiji’s PACP inclusion to boost trade with the EU
  4. AFD and BOAD sign new cooperation agreements
  5. Generational renewal in EU agricultural sector
  6. ECVC: No to the decline in the EU and CAP budget
  7. Trade-off in agriculture: Food production vs. pollution
  8. EU: New agricultural measures for outermost regions
  9. EU food agency needs to restore 'credibility'
  10. Barroso against development aid cuts
  11. EP: Resolution for EU commitment at Doha
  12. EPAs: harmful for the ACP?
  13. EU: broad support for development aid
  14. SADC-EU sign Funding Agreement
  15. Climate Change Report warns of “+4°C world” by 2100
  16. South Africa: Ireland seeks closer economic ties
  17. World Bank urges Africa to reject EPAs with EU
  18. Doha Conference: more aid for developing countries?
  19. EU Trade Agreements pose ‘tricky balance’ for African countries
  20. Caribbean exports fall under European deal
  21. New EU assistance for Somalia
  22. EU: Fishing opportunities for 2013 to be determined
  23. Carbon Credits: African LDCs, the least benefiting
  24. Europe remains Africa's favourite trade partner
  25. EU addresses the supply-demand imbalance in the EU ETS


  1. Our Video Guest: Arslan Aslihan, FAO
    2012-11-23
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Rural development, Environment

    At the 29th Brussels Development Briefing on ‘Climate change, agriculture and food security’ we sat down with Arslan Aslihan, Natural Resource Economist at the Agricultural Development Division of FAO, to discuss the scaling-up of climate-smart agriculture implementation.
    Further documentation from the Briefing available at: brusselsbriefings.net


    Link Watch the Video


  2. Main Events for the Week 26/11/2012 – 02/12/2012
    2012-11-23
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade, Rural development, Aid effectiveness, Environment, Gender and development, Migration and development, New Technologies, ACP-EU Fisheries, Food Security, Health and Development, Food Policy, ACP-EU Policy, Humanitarian Aid

    European Parliament:
    - 26-29 November: European Parliament committee meetings

     

    European Commission:
    - 26-27 November: EU Water Blueprint Conference

     

    Council of the EU
    - 26 November: General Affairs Council
    - 28-29 November: European Council: Agriculture and Fisheries Council
    - 29 November: Foreign Affairs Council (FAC) (Trade)

     

    ACP Group:
    - 26-29 November: 30th Session of the ACP PA and 24th Session of the Joint ACP-EU PA

     

    You can also read our newspaper “CTA Brussels Daily” (fed by our Twitter account), follow our new Facebook group CTABrussels and our Twitter account CTABrussels to receive up-to-date information on EU-ACP events.




  3. Fiji’s PACP inclusion to boost trade with the EU
    2012-11-23
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade

    Trade negotiations with the European Union will gain more momentum following Fiji’s re-inclusion into the Pacific ACP yesterday, Fiji representative says.
    “With now the Pacific ACP stays united and negotiating as a single region we stand the best chance of achieving the best deal possible with the EU. We both agree that regional integration is the way to develop our islands but we need to be united and everyone needs to be included in the Pacific way for regional integration and trade development to progress”, Permanent Secretary for Industry and Trade, Shaheen Ali said after the yesterday decision.
    The sectors which are expected to benefit the most are sugar, fish and textiles.
    After three years of intense lobbying to participate at the Pacific ACP Leaders meeting, Fiji has succeeded in getting all other 13 leaders to agree to its inclusion. The decision made at a special PACP Leaders meeting in Port Moresby Wednesday 21 November has been described by the Fiji Government as ‘historical’, Pacific Islands News Association (PINA) notes.

     

    Source: FBC


    Link Read more
    Link Fiji back into PACP fold
    Link More about the ACP countries


  4. AFD and BOAD sign new cooperation agreements
    2012-11-23
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Aid effectiveness

    The Groupe Agence Française de Développement (AFD) and the West African Development Bank (BOAD) signed on 15 November three new cooperation agreements for the development of the WAEMU zone. These are: a partnership agreement between AFD’s Center for Financial, Economic and Banking Studies (CEFEB) and BOAD to expand the scope of their partnership for training, capacity building and to develop the expertise of BOAD executives; a EUR 75 m credit line to refinance projects under the Regional Initiative for Sustainable Development (IRED) of the West African Economic and Monetary Union (WAEMU); and a EUR 0.5m grant to support contracting authorities in the energy sector.
    These agreements were signed during the 5th annual meeting between the AFD and the BOAD, which marks nearly 40 years of financial and technical partnerships for the development of the WAEMU zone. Since 1973, eleven concessional/non-concessional credit lines have been allocated to BOAD by AFD.


    Source: AFD


    Link Read more
    Link Find out more about the AFD
    Link Find out more about the BOAD


  5. Generational renewal in EU agricultural sector
    2012-11-23
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Rural development, Food Policy

    The European Council of Young Farmers (CEJA) is now calling for an installation aid and annual top-up payments to facilitate young farmers entry to the agricultural sector and help buffer them from market volatility and price fluctuations in their first few fragile years of business. This action is part of the new “Future Food Farmers” campaign, organized by CEJA to raise public awareness of the impending age crisis in European agriculture.
    The Common Agricultural Policy of the EU (CAP) currently has the ‘setting up of young farmers’ measure to provide installation aid to young farmers under the second axis. However, being an optional scheme, this program has a low take-up rate in Member States. A single premium or interest rate support is also given up to EUR 70,000, co-financed at 50-50%.
    In the future CAP, the Commission proposes to allocate a maximum of 2% of the annual national ceiling for direct payments to young farmers for a maximum of 25 hectares of arable land and 5 years. The main drawback of this proposal is the area and age limit – 25 hectares of arable land is considered a small area in most Member States where agricultural activity cannot be effective and profitable.
    Only 6% of agricultural holders in the EU are below the age of 35, while one third are over 65. Young farmers are faced with significant entry barriers (access to land and credit, investments, etc.), limiting their access to the agricultural sector.


    Source: CAP Reform blog.


    Link Read more
    Link The decline in the CAP budget
    Link Find out more about the CAP


  6. ECVC: No to the decline in the EU and CAP budget
    2012-11-23
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Rural development, Food Policy

    The European Coordination Via Campesina (ECVC) calls on the EU not to endorse the proposal of the President of the European Council H. Van Rompuy.
     On the eve of a major EU summit on its financial perspectives 2014-2020, ECVC, which groups farmers’ and agricultural workers’ organisations of Denmark, Switzerland, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Greece, and Turkey, with the objective is the struggle for more fair food and agricultural policies, notes European Union deprives the citizens of real perspectives for a mutually supportive and sustainable Europe. The CAP should give priority to a sustainable family farming producing for local/regional market, with a wealth of jobs, diversity and landscapes, ECVC says.
    ECVC also indicates a series of facts to which the EU should pay particularly attention, as: that the regulation is much less expensive to the EU budget than deregulation; that the priority given to international competition, to production at the lowest cost to export on a deregulated global market is expensive for taxpayers; and that if the EU wants to maintain an important CAP budget, this one must be legitimate in the eyes of the taxpayers, given that the opinion of the EU Court of Auditors, the distribution of direct payments between farms and between Member States is too uneven, even in the reform proposal.
    Van Rompuy’s proposal for the EU 2014-2020 budget reduces the CAP budget of 6% for the 1st pillar and 9% for the 2nd pillar.

     

    Source: ECVC


    Link Read more
    Link Reform of the CAP
    Link Find out more about ECVC


  7. Trade-off in agriculture: Food production vs. pollution
    2012-11-22
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Environment

    Agriculture remains a major threat to water quality in Europe, according to the latest report by the European Union’s environmental agency. But farmers and EU policymakers also highlight the trade-off between conservation objectives and pressure to increase food production.
    The European Environment Agency, in a new assessment, reports that 48% of streams and lakes in the EU will fail to meet good ecological status by 2015 as required by the 2000 Water Framework Directive. Excessive nutrients from fertilisers are a leading problem, with one consequence being the growth algae that chokes off oxygen to fish and plant life in lakes, streams and bays.
    “Agricultural production is becoming increasingly intensive, with high input of fertilisers and pesticides, in turn resulting in significant loads of pollutants to the water environment through diffuse pollution,” the EEA says in the report.
    But the fight against pollution runs head-on with concern about food security.
    There is growing pressure, in Europe and internationally, for farmers to be more productive to address tighter food supplies, rising prices and a population forecast of 9 billion – from 7 billion today – by mid-century.
    In this context, some experts say there has to be a mix of practices to both feed and protect a growing planet.
    Ben Woodcock of the British National Environment Research Council advises farmers – and policymakers – to mix intensive farming with the development of buffer areas and natural habitats that can protect water bodies, improve soil quality and nurture wildlife work as pollinators and prey on pests;“The problem is it can’t go both ways. If you keep damaging crop land, if you keep reducing the overall area of semi-natural habitats, these ecosystem services will actually decline,” he told EurActiv.

     

    Source: Euractiv


    Link Read more
    Link Read the European waters report
    Link EU Water blueprint


  8. EU: New agricultural measures for outermost regions
    2012-11-22
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Policy

    New regulations laying down specific measures for agriculture in the outermost regions of the EU and in the smaller Aegean islands are to be adopted. On Monday 19 November 2012 the Special Committee on Agriculture (SCA), under the Cyprus Presidency, supported compromise texts agreed by the Council and the European Parliament representatives during the last trilogue.
    Both regulations provide agricultural measures that are intended to remedy the difficulties caused by the remoteness of the specific territories. In one case, it covers the following outermost regions: Guadeloupe, French Guiana, Martinique, Réunion, Saint-Barthélemy, Saint-Martin, the Azores, Madeira and the Canary Islands. In the other case it covers the smaller Aegean Islands facing difficulties due to their small size, their small population, their remoteness and the lack of transport lines.
    As regards outermost regions, the new text underscores the central role played by the Programmes of options specifically relating to the remoteness and insularity (POSEI programmes) which include the two fundamental elements: the specific supply arrangements due to the remoteness and the specific measures to assist local agricultural production.
    A specific provision has been added to the regulation allowing a one-off payment of 40 millions € in 2013 in order to allow the sector of banana production in outermost regions to adapt to the reduction of banana tariffs following the latest trade agreements.
    According to the agreement between the Council and the Parliament, once all procedural steps are completed- including a vote by the Parliament at the plenary session- the regulations will be adopted by the Council and the European Parliament in the first reading.


    Source: Council of the EU


    Link Read more
    Link EU policy for outermost regions
    Link Paper on the importance of outermost regions


  9. EU food agency needs to restore 'credibility'
    2012-11-22
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Food Security

    The European Food Safety Agency (EFSA) comes under continous pressure to reform its internal procedures.
    In a message of response to EFSA's new policy paper outlining its priority concerns for the future, the Cancer Prevention and Education Society (CPES) has questioned whether EFSA "really is ready for the challenges of tomorrow" and has joined others in calling for reform of EFSA's founding regulations.
    The CPES report says "If EFSA wants in future to be a credible, scientifically expert organization, it needs to open a discussion about reforming its founding regulations. If EFSA is committed to science, it has nothing to fear from opening discussion of reform to its regulations – in fact, it should be encouraging it”.
    The EU agency has been under fire in recent months over claims about the influence representatives from industry have on the advice it gives to the commission.
    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) is the keystone of European Union (EU) risk assessment regarding food and feed safety. In collaboration with national authorities and in open consultation with its stakeholders, EFSA provides independent scientific advice and communication on existing and emerging risks, which represent a foundation for European policies and legislation and support the European Commission, European Parliament and EU Member States in taking timely risk management decisions.


    Source: The Parliament


    Link Read more
    Link Find out more about EFSA
    Link EFSA to strengthen EU risk assessment


  10. Barroso against development aid cuts
    2012-11-22
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Humanitarian Aid, Aid effectiveness

    European Commission president José Manuel Barroso has made on Wednesday 21 Novemeber an impassioned plea for Europe to safeguard development aid spending at this Thursday's EU budget summit.
    Speaking in the European parliament, Barroso said cuts to development and humanitarian aid are "a question of life and death" for the world’s most vulnerable and that Europe has a "particular responsibility to Africa".
    His speech in Strasbourg follows a proposal last week from the European council president Herman Van Rompuy to cut the European development fund, which mainly targets sub-Saharan Africa, by 11 per cent or more than €3bn.
    Some 2000 European NGOs subsequently sent a letter to the four European countries - Sweden, Denmark, the UK and Luxembourg - that are taking a lead in pressing the EU to honour its aid commitments.The letter from the NGOs, who were incensed by Van Rompuy's demands, called on these countries to "speak up" for Europe's development and humanitarian aid.
    Barroso's support for their position was said by one EU insider to have put him on a "collision course" with Van Rompuy. "It is amazing to see one president set against another on this key issue", a source quoted by The Parliament said.


    Source: The Parliament


    Link Read more
    Link EU: 'stand up and fight' for overseas aid
    Link EU: broad support for development aid


  11. EP: Resolution for EU commitment at Doha
    2012-11-22
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Environment

    The European Parliament will adopt today 22 November a Resolution which calls for more concerted action in climate funding commitments in the upcoming international talks in Doha between 26 November – 7 December.
    "The EU needs to live up to its financial commitments and to lead by example by raising its own commitments to reduce emissions by 2020",  MEP Corinne Lepage (ALDE spokesperson on Doha climate talks) said.
    "The commitments of the Parties currently on the table would lead us to a 4°C increase of temperature by 2060, according to the World Bank. There is a huge responsibility on Qatar, who will chair these negotiations and who have not shown a strong will to actively fight climate change up until now ", she added.
    The Resolution underlines a target to reduce CO2 emissions by 30% by 2020 which is essential in efforts related to UN climate talks. The key points of the Resolution include: supporting the second commitment period of the Kyoto protocol starting on 1 January 2013, limiting global warming to 2 degrees, raising the ambition of global greenhouse gas emission cuts, forging a common EU position on Assigned Amount Unit carbon credits (AAUs), looking at ways to become more energy efficient, deploying the renewable energy sources and other clean energy technologies, avoiding the gap of financing after 2012 and demonstrating necessary climate funding from 2013 to 2020.
    The Doha Summit faces a number of significant challenges for moving ahead towards a new legally-binding climate change treaty that can be agreed by 2015 and brought into effect from 2020.

     

    Source: ALDE


    Link Read more
    Link EU reaffirms commitment to FSF
    Link Doha Conference: more aid for developing countries?


  12. EPAs: harmful for the ACP?
    2012-11-21
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Policy

    A series of new experts quoted by The Southern Times call into question the benefits of the Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs) to be signed between the EU and the ACP countries.
    Thomas Deve, who is based at the Southern and Eastern African Trade Information Negotiations Institute says despite their posture as “partnership agreements”, the EU’s proposals are clearly wrapped in the free market fundamentalism espoused by the international financial institutions and the WTO: “Economic Partnership Agreements that are currently being negotiated between the European Union and some governments in Africa since 2004 are not development-oriented and it is doubtful that they will promote sustainable development, eradication of poverty, reinforcement of regional integration, improved market access, and the gradual integration of Africa into the global economy.
    “Apart from threatening the food security and livelihoods of smallholder farmers, the EPAs would also thwart government’s ability to use procurement as a tool for social change. Besides, it will also take away the policy space that is necessary for government to direct foreign investors to areas critical for national development”, said Tetteh Hormeku, head of programmes at the Third World Network-Ghana.
    Hormeku points out that liberalisation has already led to uneven competition as the EU’s unwillingness to abolish agricultural subsidies has led to the demise of many African producers. “If the EPAs come into effect, countries will experience a catastrophe. Signing to it will cover a large area of trade in goods and services.The EU demands 80 percent tariff liberalisation; and the abolishing of export tariffs would impact negatively on local producers, consumers and government revenues,” he said.
    Professor of Economics and former Governor of Nigeria’s Central Bank, Chukwuma Charles Soludo goes further to affirm EPAs are the modern equivalent of the Berlin Conference that led to Africa’s partitioning among European powers and colonisation. He  adds that EPAs will destroy Africa’s nascent industrial sector and agriculture: “Africa would almost be consigned to be specialists in the export of raw materials… The list of the damages is long and cannot be detailed here.”
    The Southern Africa–EU EPA negotiations were launched on July 8, 2004, in Windhoek, Namibia, with both sides agreeing on a joint roadmap setting out the principles, organisation, main stages and timeframe of the negotiations.


    Source: The Southern Times


    Link Read more
    Link Economic partnerships EU-ACP
    Link World Bank urges Africa to reject EPAs with EU


  13. EU: broad support for development aid
    2012-11-21
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Humanitarian Aid

    85% of EU citizens believe that Europe should continue helping developing countries despite the economic crisis. The findings were announced on November 16 by European Commissioner for Development Andris Piebalgs at the European Development Days.
    The new Eurobarometer survey on development shows that 61% of Europeans are in favour of increasing aid to help people out of poverty, and believe that aid should focus on fragile countries which have suffered conflict or natural crises. However, a majority of 55% think that rapidly growing emerging countries should no longer receive aid.
    The Eurobarometer was carried out between 2 June and 17 June, 2012. Some 26,622 Europeans aged 15 or over were interviewed face-to-face in their homes.


    Source: European Commission


    Link Read more
    Link Read the Eurobarometer report
    Link Europeaid


  14. SADC-EU sign Funding Agreement
    2012-11-21
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Rural development, Aid effectiveness

    The European Union will grant 36 million euro for the support regional integration in the Southern African Development Community (SADC). The sum will also be directed towards the development of the institutional capacity of SADC Secretariat as well as Member States, including civil society.
    The agreements signed on November 7 grant funds under three different programs- Regional Political Co-operation (18 million euro), the Institutional Capacity Development Program for 12 million euro, and a Technical Cooperation Facility for 6 million euro.
    The Agreements were signed by Dr Tomáz Augusto Salomão, SADC Executive Secretary and Ambassador Gerard McGovern, Head of the European Union Delegation to Botswana and SADC.
    According to Dr Salomão the event signifies "an important milestone in the bilateral relations between SADC and the EU and in the advancement of development cooperation for the SADC as one of the three agreements is the first contribution agreement between SADC and the EU”. Upon signing the Agreements, Ambassador McGovern stated that "despite the economic situation in the European Union, it was important that the EU keeps its promise towards partners like SADC.


    Source: allAfrica


    Link Read more
    Link EU-SADC: Facts and Figures
    Link EU a model for the SADC to follow?


  15. Climate Change Report warns of “+4°C world” by 2100
    2012-11-21
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Environment

    A new World Bank report warns the world is on track to a “+4°C world” marked by extreme heat-waves and life-threatening droughts and losses in crops. Adverse effects of global warming are “tilted against many of the world's poorest regions” and likely to undermine development efforts and goals.
    The "Turn Down the Heat: Why a 4°C Warmer World Must be Avoided" report says today’s climate could warm from the current global mean temperature of 0.8°C above pre-industrial levels, to as high as 4°C by 2100, even if countries fulfill current emissions-reduction pledges.
    Sub-tropical Mediterranean, northern Africa, the Middle East, and the contiguous United States are likely to be the most affected, seeing monthly summer temperatures rise by more than 6°C. Especially temperatures in the Mediterranean as well as in the Sahara and the Middle East are expected to approach 35°C (about 9°C warmer than the warmest July estimated for the present day), respectively 45°C ( 6-7°C above the warmest July in the present). In this context, the report, urges "further mitigation action as the best insurance against an uncertain future."
    Lower crop yields in a 4°C world are one of the most disastrous outcomes of hotter weather, as each “growing degree day” spent at a temperature of 30 degrees decreases yields by 1% under drought-free rain-fed conditions. The report also says drought-affected areas would increase from 15.4% of global cropland today, to around 44% by 2100. The most severely affected regions in the next 30 to 90 years will likely be in southern Africa, the United States, southern Europe and Southeast Asia. In Africa, the report predicts 35% of cropland will become unsuitable for cultivation in a 5°C world.
    Among other, some of the most important effects of the four degrees warning, are:  adverse impacts on water availability, particularly in northern and eastern Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia; the increase in forest fires, and the stop of coral reefs growing, or even their dissolution, as a result of oceans becoming more acidic as a result of higher CO2 concentrations.


    Source: The World Bank


    Link Read more
    Link Read the report
    Link Doha Conference: more aid for developing countries?


  16. South Africa: Ireland seeks closer economic ties
    2012-11-20
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade

    Ireland wanted to improve economic, investment and social ties with South Africa, Irish Trade and Development Minister Joe Costello said in Cape Town on Thursday 15 November, where he led the largest ever Irish trade mission - a group of 57 business leaders.
    Ireland views Africa as a future economic giant, and South Africa as a key gateway to the continent. Overall Irish economic investment in South Africa was substantial. Presently, 180 Irish companies were doing business in South Africa. Last year, 25 000 Irish tourists arrived in South Africa. "Yesterday I announced a R500-million investment by an Irish company in wind and solar farms, as well as an investment in Vodacom. We want to see investment as a two-way process," Costello announced.
    The talks were hold with the occasion of the South African-Ireland Partnership Forum, established in 2004 to stimulate meaningful cooperation between the two countries.

     

    Source: SouthAfrica.info


    Link Read more
    Link EU: 'historic opportunity' to help Africa
    Link Ascending Africa Summit in Brussels


  17. World Bank urges Africa to reject EPAs with EU
    2012-11-20
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade

    The World Bank's Chief Economist for Africa, Shantayanan Devarajan has called on African countries to reject the Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs) with the EU. He said African countries should rather sign migration agreements with the EU that have the effect of benefiting both parties equally.
    "When a low-skilled African moves to Europe, their productivity and their earnings quintuple. The other fact is while Africa's young population is growing, Europe's is shrinking. This seems like a no-brainer," Devarajan told participants, at a African Economic Conference in Kigali, Rwanda.
    Remittances represent a positive and relatively noncontroversial outcome of migration, being associated with reduction in poverty, improved education and health outcomes, and increased availability of funds for small business investments, a report from the World Bank informs . Remittances by Africans citizens living mostly in Europe and North America are estimated by the World Bank to have reached $40 billion in 2010.
    The EU has presented EPAs as replacements for previous non-reciprocal agreements such as the Lomé Conventions and the Cotonou Agreement, which expired in 2007. However EPAs have come under fire for being unfair to African economies, with critics arguing that EPAs will only succeed in exacerbating the bulging youth unemployment that African countries have yet to devise effective strategies to deal with.
    "Already 33 out of the 47 countries are LDCs [least developed countries] and therefore qualify to export 'everything but arms' to the EU with 100 per cent duty-free and quota-free. So, what is the additional benefit to these countries?" Prof. Chukwuma Charles Soludo, the Chairman of the African Heritage Foundation, wrote in an analysis of EPAs he published earlier this year.


    Source: All Africa


    Link Read more
    Link Find out more about the EPAs
    Link EU TAs pose ‘tricky balance’ for Africa


  18. Doha Conference: more aid for developing countries?
    2012-11-20
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Environment

    Progress on key areas as a new global climate deal and more aid to help vulnerable states cope with extreme weather and rising seas should not be put off in this U.N. climate change conference, starting in Doha next week, say experts cited by AlertNet
    As well as finalising a second commitment period for the Kyoto Protocol, the November 26 to December 7 conference is tasked with deciding on the process for crafting a 2015 agreement. As part of that deal, developing-nation governments want to see "sufficient ambition" on emissions targets to limit global warming to 2 degrees Celsius or less, said Dan Hamza-Goodacre, who leads an initiative for the Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) to support climate negotiators. Another crucial issue for them is how the required emissions reductions will be divided between countries - an issue referred to as "equity" at the talks.
    World leaders agreed in Copenhagen to limit the rise in the Earth's temperature to 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial times. But a report from the World Bank warned on Monday that the planet is already on track to warm by 4 degrees Celsius by the end of this century, and current pledges on emissions will not reduce this by much - a prospect that is supported by other scientific studies. The most vulnerable countries hope that the devastating impacts of Hurricane Sandy in the United States last month will have impressed on Washington - which never ratified the Kyoto Protocol - that climate change is bringing greater human and economic losses around the globe.
    A key element of that deal will be the amount of money mobilized to finance action to tackle climate change in developing countries - both to help countries cope with climate impacts like droughts, floods and rising seas, and to develop in a cleaner way. An initial "fast start" pledge of some $30 billion from rich nations over the 2010 to 2012 period runs out at the end of the year. The 2009 Copenhagen Accord promised to raise public and private climate finance of $100 billion a year by 2020, but little has been said about what will happen in the interim period, or where the money will come from.
    LDC negotiator Chowdhury, who is from Bangladesh, said the fast start money was inadequate, and developed nations should commit in Doha to provide at least $30 billion annually for the next five years, and then $50 billion per year up to 2020. This would allow the most vulnerable countries to put their adaptation plans into action and pursue climate-resilient development, he added.
    Nonetheless, some of the biggest donors - including the European Union, the United States and Japan - are saying only that they will continue to give climate aid, without signalling that it will rise, let alone by a specific amount.


    Source: AlertNet


    Link Read more
    Link EU fogs post-2012 climate aid pledges
    Link EU must step up climate cash flows to poor countries


  19. EU Trade Agreements pose ‘tricky balance’ for African countries
    2012-11-20
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade, Rural development, Aid effectiveness, Environment, Food Security, Food Policy, ACP-EU Policy, Humanitarian Aid

    In 2011, as Africa was hit by its worst drought in half a century, packets of Kenyan green beans and avocados and buckets of decorative flowers from Ethiopia were still available in European markets. This situation was the result of special EU trade treatment designed to help Sub-Saharan African countries grow out of poverty, Euractiv journalists note.
    In the same time, millions of people in Kenya, Ethiopia and Somalia were left hungry and an outpouring of emergency aid from the European Union and other major donors was triggered.
    The 2011 scenario is repeated on nearly an annual basis in a region prone to climate calamities and famine and reflects an oddity in the fight against poverty and hunger in Sub-Saharan Africa, the world’s poorest region and main recipient of EU development aid. “It’s easier to know the demands of the market in Europe than we do in our own neighbourhood,” said Mohamed Ibn Chambas,head of the African, Caribbean and Pacific Group of States (ACP).
    The EU imports 40% of Sub-Saharan Africa’s agricultural exports – including nuts, fresh-cut flowers, tea, coffee, citrus fruits and vegetables – Commission figures show. Trade has nearly doubled in the decade since Europe began forging closer economic ties with ACP states under EU commitments to boost trade and aid, with exports to the EU exceeding those between African nations.
    Poor transportation connections, high tariffs, security barriers and primitive information-sharing on market needs contribute to the problem, ACP’s Chambas told EurActiv,making it easier for much of Sub-Saharan Africa to export its agriculture and raw materials to non-Africans, and ship goods to Europe by air or sea.
    Leaders of the 53-nation African Union have approved an “action plan” to change this by promoting regional commerce and providing a more inviting manufacturing climate. The AU plan calls for the free movement of people and commerce, and multinational cooperation to address the sub-continent’s pitiful infrastructure.


    Source: Euractiv


    Link Read more
    Link Caribbean exports fall under European deal
    Link Briefing: Rural transformation in Africa


  20. Caribbean exports fall under European deal
    2012-11-20
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade

    Caricom exports to the EU have declined, with Jamaica making the biggest retreat from the European market since gaining duty-free and quota-free access there nearly five years ago, say trade experts.
    "We have had market access for years and what the data shows is that the terms for that market access have not led to enough sustainable growth for our firms," said Lincoln Price, private sector liaison at the Office of Trade Negotiations of the Caricom Secretariat, quoted by the he Jamaica Observer.
    Price, added that Caricom has not sufficiently produced value-added products, which are critical for export competitiveness: "We are essentially involved in a commodity-based approach to competitiveness, where we compete not necessarily on doing anything creative; our economies are still competing based on our natural endowments of gold, bauxite, forestry reserves, petroleum and natural gas."
    David Gomez, manager of trade and export at the Caribbean Export Development Agency, suggested that businesses need to put more focus in areas where the region is more competitive, such as the creative and services industries.
    But despite the slow pace of penetration for Caribbean businesses into Europe, there are some success stories. Baron Food Limited, a sauces and condiments manufacturer, ships over 250,000 cartons to Europe annually and has grown significantly since the EPA. Principal of Baron, Chris Persad, noted that the EPA provides an opportunity for Caribbean companies with or without prior presence in the European market. "We have already established a presence in London. What the EPA does is give us an opportunity to set up a factory in England and compete on a local scale because the market is open to both your skilled force and the capital equipment to come and invest," said Persad.
    The Cariforum group of countries (Caricom and the Dominican Republic) concluded negotiations with the European Union (EU) in December 2007 for the Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) which liberalised Europe's markets for the region's exports in goods and services, and replaced the preferential trade arrangement that governed Caricom-EU trade for decades.The EPA is a reciprocal agreement — Cariforum has 25 years to fully liberalise its markets to the EU.


    Source: Jamaica Observer


    Link Read more
    Link CTA Briefings: Small Island Economies
    Link EPA text


  21. New EU assistance for Somalia
    2012-11-19
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Aid effectiveness, Humanitarian Aid

    The European Union has announced new funding amounting to €158 million for Somalia for improving governance, strengthening security, as well as working towards better education and economic development.
    The financial support will be aimed at providing basic infrastructure, equipment and training for the national administration, the justice sector and the police. It will also assist in the organization of free and fair elections. In the field of education, the funding will be directed for improving education at all levels, and start a new education program in the refugee camps of Dadaab (Kenya) to broaden the access to education for Somali refugee children and young people there.
    With regard to economic development, actions will be directed toward the improvement of veterinary services and the trade and marketing of livestock. The money will be also used to provide training to farmers on the sustainable management of rangelands, and establish a better information system on climate change, drought and flood alerts.

     

    Source: European Commission


    Link Read more
    Link EU Relations with Somalia
    Link Joint Strategy for Somalia


  22. EU: Fishing opportunities for 2013 to be determined
    2012-11-19
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Fisheries

    The European Commission presented its proposal for next year's (2013) fishing opportunities for fish stocks which are jointly managed with third parties, such as Norway or Regional Fisheries Management Organizations (RFMOs) throughout the world.
    Commissioner Maria Damanaki, in charge of Maritime Affairs and Fisheries, said "in these negotiations, the Commission will do its utmost to obtain the best outcome for our fishermen while also respecting scientific advice."
    Today's proposal as well as an earlier proposal dated 23 October 2012 relating to fish stocks in the Atlantic and the North Sea will be discussed at the Fisheries Council meeting in Brussels in December.
    For fish stocks shared with third countries, the European Commission negotiates towards the end of each year with these countries (Norway, Faroe Islands, Greenland, Iceland, Russia) the quantities of fish to be caught in the following year, based on scientific advice.
    For the stocks in international waters and for highly migratory species, such as tuna, the European Commission negotiates fishing opportunities in the framework of Regional Fisheries Management Organizations (RFMOs). These must subsequently be transposed into EU law.
    International negotiations for many of the stocks concerned are still on-going. The proposal therefore includes relatively few figures at this stage and it will be completed once negotiations with third parties and organizations have taken place.


    Source: European Commission


    Link Read more
    Link Find out more about RFMOs
    Link EU proposals for 2013 fishing opportunities


  23. Carbon Credits: African LDCs, the least benefiting
    2012-11-19
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade, Environment

    Richer and larger developing countries benefit much more from the United Nations Clean Development Mechanism (CDM), to the detriment of African Least Developed Countries (LDCs). While almost 80% of CDM projects are located in India, Mexico, China and Brazil, Africa makes up just 2.9% of the total carbon credit registered by the CDM (260 out of more than 4,000 total projects). More than 100 CDM projects are in South Africa, Nigeria, Kenya, Egypt and Morocco – and none of these countries qualify for LDC status.
    Fewer than 35 CDM projects are located in the 33 poorest African countries, according to the UN Environment Program, partly because poorer African countries lack the large industrial sectors that the CDM is meant to incentivize.
    Many projects from the LDCs find it hard to meet the strict criteria required by the CDM, the procedure under which issues tradable carbon credits are issued.
    Outlining some of the barriers to developing carbon- offset projects in these countries, Gambia's submission to the UN on behalf of the LDC group in March states that "due to limited capacity, high transaction costs, political and economic risks, and technical characteristics of LDCs, the CDM has failed to reach many of its intended beneficiaries in the LDCs,"
    Moreover, time is running out for carbon credit project developers in richer African countries who want to sell credits to Europe. Last year, the European Union, currently the world's biggest buyer, ruled it would only buy carbon credits from least developed countries (LDCs) from 2013 onwards. Now, new developers are rushing to make the 31 December deadline but, because it can frequently take two years or more to complete registration, many will not make the cut-off date.
    Carbon markets aim to encourage sustainable development by allowing poorer countries to offset the greenhouse gas emissions of the rich world.
    As a result, several African countries will find themselves looking for a new market, as Australia, China and South Korea, notes The African Report.

     

    Source: The African Report


    Link Read more
    Link Climate summit: EU must raise ambition
    Link Find out more about CDM


  24. Europe remains Africa's favourite trade partner
    2012-11-19
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade, Gender and development

    Young African businessmen see Europe as more profitable to trade, despite its current economic woes, according to a new report into entrepreneurial attitudes in Africa.
    The Association of Business Executives’ (ABE) report revealed that one in three entrepreneurs say the EU is the most potentially lucrative global region, while just 3 per cent say the same of North America . Africa itself trailed in third place, as only 18 per cent of entrepreneurs consider that trade within the continent offers the most potential for profit.
    The survey also indicates that most business students- 99 per cent- do not see foreign aid as the answer to the job crisis affecting Africa. "Almost half (47 per cent) of African business students said that to create jobs Africa must focus on improving support for entrepreneurs," said ABE in a statement. "The second most important need was for education systems that were geared to skills that match available jobs."
    The report also shows that not many African business students are keen on starting businesses immediately after completion of their courses; 95 per cent of the students said they want to start a business, but only one is seven wanted to do so within 12 months while the others preferred to do it within a time frame of five years. Bill Gates is by far the business person most admired by African entrepreneurs, with 37 per cent of the votes.
    The survey was conducted on 12,000 African business students registered with the British qualifications body Association of Business Executives (ABE).


    Source: All Africa


    Link Read more
    Link Read the report
    Link Ascending Africa summit


  25. EU addresses the supply-demand imbalance in the EU ETS
    2012-11-19
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Environment

    The European Commission made on November 14 a proposal to revise the auction time profile and delay the auctioning of 900 million allowances in the third phase of the emissions trading system (EU ETS) in the third phase of the EU ETS starting next year (2013-2015), and adopted today a report which sets out possible measures to tackle the surplus.
    The 900 million allowances not auctioned between 2013-2015 will be transferred to the 2019-2020 phase.
    The surplus of emission allowances has primarily built up because the economic crisis has reduced industrial emissions of greenhouse gases by more than anticipated, leading in turn to lower demand for allowances from businesses. The surplus is expected to continue in the third phase of the system, which will run from 2013 to 2020.
    The adopted report outlines a shortlist of six options for structural measures that could provide a sustainable solution to the surplus in the longer term. The Commission invites stakeholders' views and will shortly launch a formal consultation process.
    The EU ETS currently covers about 11,000 industrial installations and some 40% of the EU's emissions. From this year the aviation sector is also covered.


    Source: European Commission


    Link Read more
    Link Structural reform of the EU ETS
    Link  Structural reform of the European carbon market



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Ms Isolina BOTO
Head
CTA Brussels Office
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Tel: +32 (0) 2 513 74 36 (direct); Fax +32 (0) 2 511 38 68
E-mail: boto@cta.int
Website: http://www.cta.int/
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Brussels Briefings: http://brusselsbriefings.net/

Editor: Cristina Dobos (dobos@cta.int)

NOTE
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For more information on the full range of CTA activities please go to http://www.cta.int/
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Copyright © 2011 Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation ACP-EU. Email:cta@cta.int
The opinions expressed in the comments and analysis are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of CTA.

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