Video guest: Josephine Mwangi

November 2017
M T W T F S S
30 31 1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 1 2 3



SELECT_TAGS :
















Twitter

Follow the CTA Brussels Daily

 

twitter logo

 

facebook logo cta

[CTA - Brussels Office Newsletter N° 268]
Subject: [CTA - Brussels Office Newsletter N° 268]
Send date: 2011-04-15 18:00:59
Issue #: 84
Content:
Bulletin CTA
1

This weblog shares information on key ACP-EU programmes and events
from Brussels relevant to agriculture and rural development in ACP countries.


Date : [DATE]
CTA Brussels Newsletter

 

Main events in the week
  1. CTA Brussels Briefing on "The Water we eat"
  2. Main ACP-EU events for the week from 18/04 to 22/04/2011
  3. Europe can make 30% emissions cuts, EU figures show
  4. EC publishes report on socio-economic aspects of GMO cultivation in Europe
  5. Britain set to veto EU carbon tax plans
  6. Commission to recover € 530 million of CAP expenditure from the Member States
  7. Is Doha starting to unravel?
  8. Ivory Coast: Ouattara wants EU sanctions lifted
  9. Europe scuttles African unity
  10. EU zero tolerance campaign against illegal fishing gets tougher
  11. Environment Committee strengthens legal grounds for cultivation bans
  12. Cadiz: Get business ready for EU
  13. Interim EPAs better for island countries
  14. Guduza: Swaziland, Lesotho signed EPA under duress
  15. EU subsidy policy and disastrous effects on Ghana poultry sector
  16. Regional farmers critical of Caribbean governments
  17. Bill Gates in the European Parliament
  18. New figures: EU spent a record €53.8 billion on development aid in 2010
  19. World Health Day: fight against antimicrobial resistance must continue on a global scale
  20. Share of renewables in EU27 energy supply almost doubled between 1999 and 2009
  21. Pan-European forest talks to aim for 2013 deal
  22. EC: $100 billion per year by 2020 for climate "challenging but feasible"


  1. CTA Brussels Briefing on "The Water we eat"
    2011-04-15
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Rural development, Environment, Food Security

    The last Brussels Briefing on “The Water we eat – Challenges for ACP countries in times of scarcity” took place on April 13. Around 100 ambassadors, policy-makers, NGO representatives and member state delegates followed the discussions in the Walter Hallstein room of the Berlaymont, European Commission. Another 127 viewers followed discussions through a live webstream and participated via email and Twitter. A documentation of the conference including a conference report, photos and the video documentation of the briefing will be published here. You can already download the speakers’ PowerPoint presentations and their executive summaries from this page. The next Brussels Briefing will be held on 8th June 2011 on Linking Agriculture and Nutrition. It will be co-organised with the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), the ACP Secretariat, DG DEVCO and other partners. To find more information about it, please consult http://brusselsbriefings.net from next week on.


    Link Read more
    Link Download presentations
    Link Past Briefings


  2. Main ACP-EU events for the week from 18/04 to 22/04/2011
    2011-04-15
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade, Rural development, Aid effectiveness, Environment, Archive, Regional Fisheries, Food Security

    European Parliament
    -19 April: Environment Committee
    -20 April: Women’s Rights and Gender Equality Committee
    -18-21 April: Other committee meetings
    Council of Ministers
    -20 April: Coreper I
    European Commission
    -20 April: Presentation of the draft budget for 2012
    ACP Group of States
    -19 April: Committee of Ambassadors

    You can also read our newspaper “CTA Brussels Daily” (fed by our Twitter account), follow our new Facebook group CTABrussels and our Twitter account CTABrussels to receive up-to-date information on EU-ACP events.


    Link European Parliament
    Link Council of Ministers
    Link ACP Secretariat


  3. Europe can make 30% emissions cuts, EU figures show
    2011-04-15
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Environment

    A 30% cut in greenhouse gas emissions is possible by 2020 if Europe meets its efficiency targets, according to the maths used by Climate Commissioner Connie Hedegaard. But no-one in the Commission will say this publicly for two reasons. One is that the dry figures involved hint at a well-known and still simmering dispute between the European Commission's climate and energy departments – DG Clima and DG Energy. The other is that a lack of inter-departmental coordination has turned the issue into a technical dog's dinner.

    Source: Euractiv


    Link Read more
    Link Read the report
    Link DG Climate


  4. EC publishes report on socio-economic aspects of GMO cultivation in Europe
    2011-04-15
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Environment, Archive, Food Security

    A new European Commission report demonstrates the current limitations in assessing the socio-economic implications of cultivation of genetically modified (GM) crops in the European Union. Specifically, the report to the European Parliament and the Council, which is based on information principally provided by Member States, reveals that the existing information is often statistically limited and that it is frequently based on already preconceived ideas about GMO cultivation. [...] In the report, the Commission also presents an analysis of the socio-economic dimensions of GMO cultivation as reported in the international scientific literature and in the conclusions of research projects funded under the European Framework Programme for Research.  Since the EU represents only a fraction of the worldwide surface dedicated to GM crops, the experience with GMO cultivation in Europe is admittedly limited. It is, therefore, no surprise that the amount of statistically relevant information on the ex-post socio-economic impacts of GMO cultivation is rather limited. The economic data specific to the European paradigm concerned studies in Member States with experience in cultivation of herbicide-tolerant (HT) or pest-resistant (Bt) GM crops. These studies showed that, when the weed or pest pressure is high, farmers cultivating HT and Bt GM crops could benefit from higher yields. In the report, social consequences and economic impacts of GMO cultivation on the other parts of the food chain were subject to significant comments. To complement the input by Member States, the report also provides a review of the existing international scientific literature on the social and economic dimension of GMO cultivation.

    Source: European Commission


    Link Read more
    Link EFSA: GMOs
    Link EP: EU countries should be able to ban GMOs


  5. Britain set to veto EU carbon tax plans
    2011-04-15
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Environment

    The British government is "highly likely" to block European Commission proposals for a carbon tax contained in a widely-circulated draft version of the Energy Taxation Directive, EU diplomatic sources said on 12 April. "Without saying that we will definitely kill this thing before it is born, I think it is highly likely that we will block it," a diplomat from one member state told EurActiv.

    Source: Euractiv


    Link Read more
    Link EU: Revision of the Energy Taxation Directive
    Link Energy taxation: EC promotes energy efficiency


  6. Commission to recover € 530 million of CAP expenditure from the Member States
    2011-04-15
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Rural development, ACP-EU Trade

    A total of € 530 million of EU agricultural policy funds unduly spent by Member States is being claimed back by the European Commission today under the so-called clearance of accounts procedure. This money returns to the EU budget because of non-compliance with EU rules or inadequate control procedures on agricultural expenditure. Member States are responsible for paying out and checking expenditure under the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP), and the Commission is required to ensure that Member States have made correct use of the funds. Under this latest decision, funds will be recovered from Bulgaria, Denmark, Greece, Spain, France, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Romania and United Kingdom while there is a small reimbursement made to Germany.

    Source: European Commission


    Link Read more
    Link Commission: Recent Food Prices
    Link Further information about the decision


  7. Is Doha starting to unravel?
    2011-04-15
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade

    Spring is here. At a time of year when one throws the windows wide open, it would appear that the window that was announced for Doha is closing, without much ado but almost for certain. Easter is coming up, and the new texts of modalities are not – and will not be – on the table. At the last informal meeting of the Trade Negotiations Committee (on 29 March), Pascal Lamy painted a gloomy picture, noted the lack of a spirit of give-and-take, and urged the members to reflect on the cost of a non-Round, not only for the world economy as a whole but also and above all for the development prospects that the Round was supposed to open up for the least developed and most vulnerable countries.

    Read more in the IDEAScentre newsletter


    Link Read the newsletter
    Link WTO: Cotton sub-committee
    Link IDEAScentre


  8. Ivory Coast: Ouattara wants EU sanctions lifted
    2011-04-15
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade

    Ivory Coast's internationally recognised President Alassane Ouattara has urged the EU to lift sanctions, in a bid to restart the ailing economy. Mr Ouattara now controls the main cocoa-exporting port of San Pedro, and wants to restart the trade. But his troops are still not in control of all of the main city Abidjan, where his rival Laurent Gbagbo remains holed up in the presidential residence. Aid agencies are warning of a deepening humanitarian crisis in Abidjan. Residents of the city are without basic amenities such as running water and power, and food supplies are running low. Witnesses say bodies are lying on the streets after days of bitter fighting between loyalists of the two presidential claimants.

    Source: BBC


    Link Read more
    Link Piebalgs announces a recovery package of €180 million for Ivory Coast
    Link Unlike that cocoa exports restart directly


  9. Europe scuttles African unity
    2011-04-15
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade, Rural development, Aid effectiveness

    A major contradiction of globalisation is to integrate and centralise certain regions while disintegrating and marginalising others. While the former has produced large and powerful blocks like the EU, the latter tends to produce what sociologist Manuel Castells has described as "black holes in informational capitalism: regions (where there is) no escape from suffering and deprivation". Africa is progressively acquiring that image. The rapid integration and growth of European and North American economies and the steady centralisation of political authority, particularly in Europe, stand in stark contrast to the marginalisation, impoverishment and fragmentation on the African continent. Almost all African countries still remain vertically integrated to Europe. This is being re-enforced by the signing of economic partnership agreements (EPAs) between the EU and countries from Africa, the Caribbean and the Pacific (ACP) which will open up Africa's resources to European multinationals, block Africa's integration and obstruct south-south cooperation. This constitutes a major obstacle to horizontal integration between African countries and may create obstacles in Africa's relations with China. The irony is that while Europe is creating greater unity through an expanded EU, Africa - under EU pressure - is disintegrating into regional EPAs linked to the EU with the effect of weakening existing regional economic communities and eventually scuttling the dream of a politically unified Africa.

    Source: businesslive.co.za


    Link Read more
    Link Commission: ACP-EU EPAs
    Link Spain: Towards real development effectiveness?


  10. EU zero tolerance campaign against illegal fishing gets tougher
    2011-04-14
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Regional Fisheries

    Getting away with fishing illegally will become much more difficult for fishermen, as the EU's new system for fisheries control is now fully operational. With the adoption of detailed rules on how to carry out controls throughout the market chain "from net to plate", the EU now has the means to break with the past and establish a real culture of compliance to stop overfishing and help make EU fisheries truly sustainable. The new system ensures traceability throughout the whole chain from the time when the fish is caught until it reaches the consumer. Member states' authorities can spot wrongdoings at any point in the market chain, and trace them back to the culprit. Inspections will be done in the same way all over Europe. Data are collected and cross-checked electronically. And once the product reaches the stores, the consumer will know it has been fished legally. If someone breaks the law, they will face equally severe sanctions wherever they are and whatever their nationality. And if they are repeatedly caught fishing illegally, thanks to a new point system they will end up losing their licence. "If we can't enforce our own rules, this undermines the credibility of the whole common fisheries policy, no matter how sound it may be. We now have a comprehensive system of control and enforcement and I expect compliance with EU fishing rules to improve from now on. We can no longer allow even a small minority of fishermen to ignore the rules, and get away with it. Apart from being unfair this also undermines conservation efforts; it disrupts markets with unfair competition; it penalises law-abiding fishermen and chokes the circle of compliance; and, most importantly, it destroys fish stocks", said Commissioner for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries Maria Damanaki.

    Source: European Commission


    Link Read more
    Link Q&A on the new EU fisheries control rules
    Link Fisheries Committee backs binding rules for port states


  11. Environment Committee strengthens legal grounds for cultivation bans
    2011-04-14
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade, Environment, Archive

    EU Member States should be able to state environmental grounds, such as pesticide resistance, for restricting or banning the cultivation of EU-approved genetically-modified crops, said the Environment Committee on Tuesday. Stating these grounds could strengthen legal protection against possible WTO challenges to GMO bans, it added. The committee amended a Commission proposal that will allow EU Member States to restrict or ban the cultivation of genetically-modified crop varieties, so as to allow national authorities to cite environmental grounds. While some MEPs in committee would have preferred to dismiss the Commission proposal altogether, a majority, led by rapporteur Corinne Lepage (ALDE, FR), opted to maintain it with changes. Her report was adopted with 34 votes in favour, 10 against and 16 abstentions. She commented: “This vote is a clear signal from the Parliament to the Council and Commission: the EU authorisation system should be maintained but it should be acknowledged that some agricultural and environmental impacts, as well as socio-economic impacts linked to contamination, can be cited by Member States to justify a ban or restriction on GMO cultivation."

    Source: European Parliament


    Link Read more
    Link Commission: Food Safety and GMOs
    Link Decision process and documents


  12. Cadiz: Get business ready for EU
    2011-04-14
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade, Rural development, Regional Fisheries

    The Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) between the Caribbean Forum of African, Caribbean and Pacific States (CARIFORUM) is almost 13 years old, yet Caribbean states remain vulnerable in some ways to the eventual free-access EU goods and services will have to their markets. Trade and Industry Minister Stephen Cadiz has therefore called on the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) to take the appropriate steps to ensure their businesses can compete on the international market. “When you open your market to a grouping like the EU there can be some negative fallout. Revenues to the different Caricom territories may suffer with the increased access of EU goods and services to their markets. We have to make sure that does not happen, that the territories are all strong enough. As CARICOM, we can in fact do that, we can help and work with each other to deal with the EU.” Cadiz was speaking to Newsday, following his presentation at a European Union/CARIFORUM seminar on doing business with Europe under the Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA), at Hilton Trinidad. The trade minister acknowledged the EPA’s good aspects too, saying CARICOM now had trade and cultural access across Europe, with the exception of Belgium. “Energy would still be a major export from TT but not just selling our raw material. We are looking at a whole host of downstream products, such as plastics and textiles that we can produce. TT therefore needs to identify where those export markets are.” […] “Ultimately,” Cadiz told seminar attendants, “the EPA is a platform to expand businesses by creating predictable market access. It promotes economic growth, and through encouraging joint ventures and other strategic partnerships, it allows for access to EU technology and ultimately technology transfer. In essence it promotes greater trade between our two regions.”

    Source: Trinidad and Tobago's Newsday


    Link Read more
    Link EU provides 23.1 million € to TT
    Link DomRep wants CARIFORUM restructured


  13. Interim EPAs better for island countries
    2011-04-14
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade, Regional Fisheries

    A comprehensive Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) with the European Union may not be possible for the region, Papua New Guinea believes. Foreign Affairs Minister Don Poyle however believes that countries, depending on the size of their economies, should negotiate interim EPAs like PNG and Fiji. The two countries have negotiated interim EPAs on sugar and fish with the EU. Mr Poyle said a comprehensive EPA was too broad but he encouraged other Melanesian Spearhead Group countries to follow PNG and Fiji. Yesterday, saw the end of the foreign ministers meeting where trade within the group was discussed. Mr Poyle said PNG was of the view that countries must benefit or play a part in any investment within the country. "There’s no point in bringing in foreign investment if the people don’t benefit, own it or participate in it," Mr Poyle said. He added the MSG meeting discussed issues that would promote the influence of the five-nation bloc in the region.

    Source: bilaterals.org


    Link Read more
    Link The poorest on the edge of water scarcity
    Link Agricultural commodity and food prices in the EU


  14. Guduza: Swaziland, Lesotho signed EPA under duress
    2011-04-14
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade

    Speaker in the House of Assembly Prince Guduza says Swaziland and Lesotho signed the interim Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) with the European Union (EU) under duress. He said both countries signed the agreement because they had certain export quotas to the EU. He noted that the EPA sowed a seed of confusion in the Southern Africa Development Community (SADC). “SADC signed trade protocols for its members, which are binding. The parliamentary conference on trade and EPA which was held in Botswana in the previous weeks came up with numerous recommendations regarding trade in the region. One being that governments in the SADC region must involve civic society and parliamentarians in EPA negotiations,” he said. The Speaker said the advent of EPAs did not allow membership to more than one trade group. He said they realised that within SADC there were members of the Southern Africa Customs Union (SACU) as well as the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA). He said as much as the countries were trying hard to address the EPAs, the SADC region was still disintegrated. He noted that Swaziland and Lesotho were subject to fail in the implementation of the EPAs as there was no way they would transport goods since South Africa did not allow such as it was subjected to SACU rules. The Speaker said the signing of the EPA was no longer in the SADC protocol. He said the EPA would be unworkable as it was anti the economic regional agenda signed through the SADC trade protocol.

    Source: The Swazi Observer


    Link Read more
    Link EU Delegation to Swaziland
    Link Interim EPAs between the EU and Africa


  15. EU subsidy policy and disastrous effects on Ghana poultry sector
    2011-04-13
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade, Rural development

    In a recent speech to CUTS in Geneva Mr. Pascal Lamy, the Director-General of WTO, argued, inter alia, that in order to reduce its food deficits, “African Agriculture needs to become more efficient, and…to discover ‘specialization’”, rather than opting for self-sufficiency. He implicitly drew an analogy between the division of labour between Einstein and his Assistant and Ricardo’s theory of comparative cost advantage (CA). Hence, “it would make no sense for Africa to produce everything for itself [become self-sufficient], just as it makes no sense for Einstein to process documents too” in addition to his scientific work. […] For the OECD countries, not only the concepts of division of labour, CA, efficiency and market forces do not apply, and import substitution is justified; but also dumping “inefficiently produced” food and other agricultural products to Africa is acceptable. According to Mr. Lamy, African agriculture has suffered because it was shielded from international competition. […] The amount of agricultural support received by farmers in OECD countries in 2009 (direct and indirect subsidies, etc. and price supports) amounted to about $348 billion. In terms of per capita of rural population of OECD countries it is about $1421; nearly 2.39 times greater than per capita income of the total population of African least developed countries and Haiti. In the same year, the corresponding support received by EU farmers was $92.954 billion, and the direct support alone constituted 24 per cent of their gross receipts as compared with 22% in 2007. Consider, as an example, the case of Ghana, and its imports, inter alia, of chicken from EU. Under the pressure from the World Bank and IMF, Ghana reduced its tariffs on agricultural goods and liberalized its agricultural sector fully in the 1980s. Although the bound tariff rate for chicken is higher than the applied tariff, the IMF did not allow the Government to increase it despite the decision of Ghana’s Parliament. The country does not have any legislation to take anti-dumping, countervailing or safeguard measures on imports. During the last couple of decades Ghana has been dumped on by imported EU chicken. For example, in 2002, total subsidies paid to the EU poultry industry constituted over 27 % of unit value of production out of which 9.7% was in the form of export refund; 8% of the EU’s exports were directed to West Africa (out of which 2.4%-or 27.5 million tonnes) was exported to Ghana - eight times higher than in 1996. The imported chicken was supplied at a price which was sold at 57% of the price of domestically produced chicken. As a result of dumped imports, in 2001 domestic chicken production in Ghana accounted for only 11% of domestic consumption as against 95% in 1992. Thus, domestic producers developed excess production capacity. Chicken is not the only agricultural product, and Ghana is not the only African country, suffering from dumping prices: cereal, soya, milk, meat and other animal products, sugar, even tomato and cotton etc. have had more or less the same fate. Hence, I wish, Mr. Lamy would have indicated in which agricultural products Africa should specialize. How about EU and other OECD countries?

    Source: africanagricultureblog.com


    Link Read more
    Link Commission: Advancing African agriculture
    Link World Trade Organisation


  16. Regional farmers critical of Caribbean governments
    2011-04-13
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade, Rural development, Food Security

    Small farmer organisations from across the Caribbean have criticized regional governments and their bureaucrats for leaving them to “see for themselves” during a period of rising food prices and declining agricultural products. The criticism came during the start of a two-day workshop to discuss the benefits from a technical assistance programme being initiated by the Caribbean Farmers Network (CaFAN) and funded by the Office of Europe-Africa-Caribbean-Pacific Liaison Committee, Pest Initiative Programme (COLEACP/PIP). […] Conference coordinator Jethro Greene said that Caribbean governments have placed the farming industry on the back burner providing little support to the farming community. He told delegates that even now, at a time of a food crisis, Caribbean leaders were only pretending to care since it has been very easy to discern that they were not really concerned. “So what they are trying to do now is to play catch-up. They are a lot of recommendations on paper and several policy documents but in terms of adopting any practical or implementing solutions there are not even proper financing mechanisms for farmers to produce commodities. “There are not even proper marketing and storage throughout most of these countries, these some of the burning concerns. So we in the Caribbean Farmers Network decided that it was time to act, as we can no longer trust the future of agriculture at the national and regional level in the hands of bureaucrats who jump around like chickens with their heads cut off when there is problem and who have been pushing services over agriculture,” Greene said. The Caribbean small farmers and their representative organizations are discussing strategies for improving their quality of life and will participate in a needs assessment programme. “We are meeting with those institutions that fund agriculture programmes and we would not be asking but telling them what we want in terms of our desire to improve the quality of life of our farmers and their capability to produce. “With support funding from the European Union, they are going to decide how the two year technical assistance programme can be utilized to help train and generally improve the lot of farmers,” Greene added.

    Source: Antigua Observer


    Link Read more
    Link Caribbean Farmers' Network
    Link COLEACP


  17. Bill Gates in the European Parliament
    2011-04-12
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Rural development, Aid effectiveness, Archive

    Vaccinations not only help citizens in developing countries to improve their health, but also provide population control. That was one of the main messages that Bill Gates conveyed to Members of the Development Committee in the European Parliament that he visited on Tuesday. The talk was highly attended and clearly MEPs had a very high esteem for the biggest private donor in the world.

    “If children become healthier, parents are less likely to have a lot of children,” Gates explained the Gates Foundations’ approach to population control. “Often, they aim at having two children who reach adulthood so that they can support their parents later.” The healthier children are, the less need there is for a family to have five or more children, said Gates. There is a particular need for vaccines, he said, given that a third of children in Africa have had a serious health issue by the time they are five years old. In many cases, this health issues means that their brain will never develop into its full capacity. “We have to be careful and only give those vaccines that work very well,” Gates stressed, “but the prices for vaccines have dropped and it doesn’t necessarily take a fully-educated doctor to give a vaccination. So there is a lot of potential.”

    Gates welcomed the efforts of many European countries to increase the share of development aid to 0.7% of GDP. He dismissed the criticism that parts of the population and experts have brought forward against development aid. “Most of the criticism is very global. You have to be more specific. For example, you cannot criticize donations of vaccines. Or budgetary support aid.” Yet, Gates also pointed to the problems encountered in the attribution of aid. “You always know that some of you money will be misused. We try to limit this share to less than 5 percent.” In general, development aid should be spent well. In a speech, he outlines which investments could make it possible to achieve the Millenium Development Goals within the next ten years.

    Bill Gates also stressed the importance of technology. Within the next five years, he expects to see some new breakthroughs, in the next ten years a few very important breakthroughs. The possibility of handling virtual money, for example, which could allow governments in the global South to establish a national tax system without incurring high administration costs.

    Source: CTA


    Link Gates: We have to be smarter about aid spending
    Link Gates Foundation
    Link Cmmr Georgieva: Meeting Bill Gates


  18. New figures: EU spent a record €53.8 billion on development aid in 2010
    2011-04-12
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Aid effectiveness

    Commissioner for Development Andris Piebalgs presented the 2010 preliminary figures on official development aid spent by the EU and its 27 Member States. Aid rose by about €4.5 billion from 2009, reaching a total of €53.8 billion, which confirms the EU's position as the largest and most generous donor of official development assistance, providing more than half of global official aid. Although the EU missed its target for 2010, it still made positive progress despite the economic downturn. Three of the five largest donors worldwide are EU members and four of them have already reached the 0.7% target. Overall, EU aid represents 0.43% of EU Gross National Income. A substantial collective effort is still needed in order to achieve the goal of 0.7% by 2015, to which Member States have been committed. […] In 2009, budgetary constraints weighed heavily on aid and many donors, including several EU Member States, decreased their spending on official development assistance (ODA), which resulted in a total of €49 billion or 0.42% of Gross National Income (GNI) for the Union in 2009. In 2010, 17 Member States increased aid volumes again, thus reversing the trend of the previous year. Expressed as a share of GNI and in total terms, 2010 consequently saw the highest amount of ODA ever spent by Europe: €53.8 billion (0.43% of GNI). Still, this falls far short of the commitments made by the EU, which had pledged to achieve 0.56% of GNI collectively for 2010. In absolute terms, EU spending stayed €14.5 billion below this commitment. Ten Member States spent less on ODA than in 2009. The Commission commends the countries that have continued to increase their aid. Three out of the five largest donors worldwide are EU members – France, Germany and the United Kingdom. Sweden, the Netherlands, Luxembourg and Denmark have already achieved 0.7% and remain well above this level. Altogether nine Member States were above the minimum targets set for EU Member States for 2010: Luxembourg, Sweden, Denmark, the Netherlands, Belgium, the United Kingdom, Finland, Ireland and Cyprus.

    Source: European Commission


    Link Read more
    Link New Europe: EU misses its targets
    Link EU: Has devolution of aid worked?


  19. World Health Day: fight against antimicrobial resistance must continue on a global scale
    2011-04-11
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Archive

    This year's World Health Day focuses on the growing threat of potentially deadly bacteria developing resistance to antimicrobial drugs - especially to antibiotics. The Commission joins the World Health Organisation in calling for strengthened efforts to combat antimicrobial resistance, which is a global health hazard. In the Union alone, it is estimated that drug resistant infections cause more than 25,000 deaths and 1.5Bn€ in extra healthcare costs every year. [...] In November 2011, to coincide with Antibiotic Awareness Day, the Commission is planning to present a new strategy addressing all sources of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and their potential impacts. It will address public health, food safety, consumer safety, environment, animal health and welfare as well as non-therapeutic use of antimicrobial substances. On the occasion of World Health Day a brochure showcasing EU-funded research projects on AMR from 2007-2010 is made available. Tackling AMR requires investing in research and innovation. The EU has prioritised research in this field, supporting numerous research projects for a total amount of approximately €300 million since 1999. [...] EU-funded projects have helped better understand resistance mechanisms and identify novel antimicrobial compounds that may lead to future drugs. The knowledge generated by this research not only contributes to improving human health but also stimulates innovation and competitiveness in Europe.

    Source: European Commission


    Link Read more
    Link ECDC: Antimicrobial resistance (AMR)
    Link EU AMR Policy


  20. Share of renewables in EU27 energy supply almost doubled between 1999 and 2009
    2011-04-11
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Environment, Archive

    In 2009, oil remained the main source of energy in the EU27, with a share of 37% in the total gross inland energy consumption. However, there have been changes in the mix of sources contributing to gross inland energy consumption over the last decade. The share of renewable energy has almost doubled, from 5% of total gross inland energy consumption in 1999 to 9% in 2009, while gas rose from 22% to 24%. Nuclear energy remained almost stable at 14% during this period, while oil fell from 39% to 37% and solid fuels from 18% to 16%. These figures are published by Eurostat, the statistical office of the European Union in connection with the EU Sustainable Energy Week from 11 to 15 April 2011, which promotes energy efficiency and renewable energy. Oil represented more than half of energy supply in Malta (100% of total gross inland energy consumption), Cyprus (96%), Luxembourg (63%), Greece (55%), Ireland (52%) and Portugal (50%). The highest shares of gas were observed in the Netherlands (43%), Italy and the United Kingdom (both 38%) and Hungary (36%). The largest proportions for solid fuels were registered in Estonia (58%), Poland (54%), the Czech Republic (41%) and Bulgaria (36%), for nuclear energy in France (40%), Lithuania (34%) and Sweden (29%), and for renewable energy in Latvia (36%), Sweden (34%), Austria (27%) and Finland (23%). Renewable energy comprises hydro, wind, biomass, geothermal and solar energy. All Member States showed increases in the share of renewable energy in their energy supply between 1999 and 2009, with the largest increases in Denmark (from 8% of total gross inland energy consumption in 1999 to 17% in 2009), Sweden (from 27% to 34%), Germany (from 2% to 8%), Portugal (from 13% to 19%), Slovakia (from 3% to 7%), Austria (from 23% to 27%), Latvia (from 32% to 36%), Spain (from 5% to 9%), Slovenia (from 9% to 13%) and Hungary (from 3% to 7%).

    Source: Eurostat


    Link Read more
    Link EU Sustainable Energy Week
    Link Uganda: Sun Smiling on Renewable Energy Initiative


  21. Pan-European forest talks to aim for 2013 deal
    2011-04-11
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Rural development, Environment

    The EU-27 and 19 other European countries are preparing to launch intergovernmental talks that are expected to result in a legally-binding agreement on sustainable use of forests in 2013. In parallel, the European Commission is kicking off talks to revamp its forest policy. An agreement to open negotiations is expected to be reached by the Ministerial Conference on the Protection of Forests in Europe, which will take place in Oslo, Norway, on 14-16 June. Draft ministerial decision and other documents for the June conference were adopted last week at an expert level meeting of representatives of the 'Forest Europe' countries and the European Union.

    Source: Euractiv.com


    Link Read more
    Link EU Sustainable Energy Week
    Link EU: International Forest Year


  22. EC: $100 billion per year by 2020 for climate "challenging but feasible"
    2011-04-11
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Aid effectiveness, Environment

    A Commission staff working document on "Scaling up international climate finance after 2012" confirms that raising USD 100 billion per year by 2020 will be challenging but it can be done, if the right balance is struck between public funding, funding raised from international carbon markets, as well as private funds, partly leveraged by development banks. Climate funding and development aid need to go hand-in-hand and it requires strong international coordination to ensure an efficient spending. Connie Hedegaard, Commissioner for Climate Action, said: "The EU is already well on track to deliver its fast start funding for the period 2010-2012. And we will also contribute our fair share to climate funding in the long run. Both private and public sources of financing from the EU and other developed countries are essential to support actions for reducing emissions and adapting to climate change in developing countries." Olli Rehn, Commissioner for Economic and Monetary Affairs, emphasized that "many advanced economies will face serious fiscal constraints in the years to come. Therefore this cannot be paid by public money alone. We need to rely also on innovative sources of financing, in particular, in the private sector and carbon markets. We should make good use of innovative financing mechanisms in close cooperation with development banks." […] Several of the public sources related to carbon pricing assessed in the AGF report are already in place in the EU or will be increasingly used in the next years. Other public sources, such as taxes on international maritime and aviation transport, or on financial transactions, would require more global cooperation. The carbon market can deliver a substantial contribution if, in addition to improvements in the existing Clean Development Mechanism, sectoral carbon market mechanisms are introduced. Private finance will also have a key role in scaling-up international climate finance. Multilateral and other development banks can further leverage these sources of climate finance.

    Source: European Commission


    Link Read more
    Link Read the report
    Link Climate Change Conference Durban



===========================================================
Please feel free to forward this newsletter to other interested colleagues.

Isolina BOTO
CTA
39 rue Montoyer
1000 Brussels
Belgium
Tel 02 513 74 36
Fax 02 511 38 68
http://www.cta.int/
http://bruxelles.cta.int/

Webmaster: André Feldhof (feldhof@cta.int)

NOTE
If you have questions or suggestions, please write to us at : boto@cta.int
For more information on the full range of CTA activities please go to http://www.cta.int/
More information on CTA activities in Brussels at : http://brussels.cta.int/
CTA is an institution of the ACP Group of States (Africa, Caribbean and Pacific) and the EU (European Union), in the framework of the Cotonou Agreement and is financed by the EU.
Copyright © 2009 Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation ACP-EU. Email:cta@cta.int
The opinions expressed in the comments and analysis are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of CTA.

You are currently subscribed to the CTA Brussels Newsletter.

Your subscription :

===========================================================


 

 

1