Video guest: Josephine Mwangi

October 2017
M T W T F S S
25 26 27 28 29 30 1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31 1 2 3 4 5



SELECT_TAGS :
















Twitter

Follow the CTA Brussels Daily

 

twitter logo

 

facebook logo cta

[CTA - Brussels Office Newsletter N° 241]
Subject: [CTA - Brussels Office Newsletter N° 241]
Send date: 2010-09-27 11:43:45
Issue #: 57
Content:
Bulletin CTA
1

This weblog shares information on key ACP-EU programmes and events
from Brussels relevant to agriculture and rural development in ACP countries.


Date : [DATE]
CTA Brussels Newsletter

 

Main events in the week
  1. Our video guest this week: Prof. De Schutter, UN Special Rapporteur
  2. Briefing: Strengthening the Caribbean agri-food private sector
  3. Main ACP-EU events for the week of 27/09 to 1/10/2010
  4. Internal Arrangements to imrpove the European Union's external policy
  5. Africa-EU Energy Partnership
  6. Irish lead EU in donations to development aid charities
  7. Caribbean: EPA Not so Momentous After All, Study Says
  8. Europeans and the Millennium Development Goals
  9. The EPA: Towards a New Era for Caribbean Trade
  10. Commission plans climate targets for 2030, 2050
  11. European Earth observation programme
  12. European External Action Service
  13. Support for ACP banana exporting countries
  14. International Investment Policy- Views from the EU Council
  15. 11th meeting of the EU–South Africa Cooperation
  16. EPA: views from the EU Council
  17. Growing coalition urges to move on a Financial Transaction Tax
  18. Foreign citizens made up 6.4% of the EU27 population
  19. Fifty years for the Special Committee on Agriculture
  20. ECOWAS lawmakers caution on EU trade pact
  21. Piebalgs partners with UNESCO to support poverty reduction
  22. Genemark: helping Africa to take care of itself
  23. World trade likely to grow by 13.5% in 2010
  24. ECOWAS urges caution on EU trade deal
  25. BTC awarded ISO 9001 certification
  26. Development: Increased assistance and effectiveness
  27. The world's first project network for CO2 Capture and Storage
  28. Africa-EU Renewable Energy Cooperation Programme


  1. Our video guest this week: Prof. De Schutter, UN Special Rapporteur
    2010-09-27
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Food Security, ACP-EU Trade, Rural development

    Our video guests this week is Professor Olivier De Schutter, he is the  United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food. In this interview, Prof. De Schutter explains why the office of the UN special Rapporteur on the Right to Food cares about large scale land acquisitions and how the right to food can be conciliated with large scale land acquisitions. He further addresses the right to food in the context of international investment law. Prof. De Schutter also gives examples of alternatives to large scale farming methods and pledges for the often neglected side effects of community based small scale farming. This interview was given as a contribution to the ACP Regional Briefing on Land access, land acquisitions and rural development held in Yaoundé from the 27th to 28th September, 2010. This event has been organized by the CTA and its partners.


    Link Watch the video
    Link Prof. Olivier De Schutter
    Link ACP Regional Briefings


  2. Briefing: Strengthening the Caribbean agri-food private sector
    2010-09-24
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade, Rural development, Aid effectiveness, Environment, Archive, Regional Fisheries, Food Security

    The CTA and its partners will held the second regional Briefing in the Caribbean on "Strengthening the Caribbean agri-food private sector: challenges for SMEs in the agri-food sector in the Caribbean"on 18-19th October at the occasion of the Caribbean Agricultural Week. The ACP regional Briefings are linked to the Brussels Briefings (http://brusselsbriefings.net)
    This Briefing will discuss the challenges that the Caribbean private sector faces in the context of the financial and food crises as well as the resulting increased demand for agricultural products. While looking at the broader economic environment,it will examine the key issues involved on value chains and clusters. Access to finance by the private sector has always remained a major challenge and SMEs still struggle to access finance due to some stringent requirements by commercial banks and the existing and potential financing mechanisms in support of the private sector at regional level will be reviewed. Finally, the last panel will look into the startegies needed for repositioning Caribbean agriculture.

    Contact; boto@cta.int or lopes@cta.int


    Link ACP Regional Briefings
    Link Brussels Briefing
    Link Registration_Form.pdf Programme_5.pdf

  3. Main ACP-EU events for the week of 27/09 to 1/10/2010
    2010-09-24
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade, Rural development, Aid effectiveness, Environment, Archive, Regional Fisheries, Food Security

    European Parliament (Brussels):
    -28th  September : Hearing on the Europe2020 trade policy
    - 28th September: Commissioner Dacian Ciolos at the Committee on Agriculture 
    - 29th September: Vote international fisheries agreements
    EU Presidency (Brussels):
    -27th September : Agriculture and Fisheries Council
    -30th September- 1st of October: Informal Economic and Financial Affairs Council
    ACP Secretariat (Brussels):
    -27th- 30th September: Joint ACP-EU Parliamentary Assembly
    -27th -30 Septmber: Meeting of ACP Ministers in charge of migration

    For more information please consult the calendar on our webpage http://brussels.cta.int/


    Link European Parliament
    Link Belgian EU Presidency
    Link ACP Secretariat


  4. Internal Arrangements to imrpove the European Union's external policy
    2010-09-24
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Aid effectiveness

    The European Council held in Brussels on 16 September 2010 reached the following conclusions on the Internal Arrangements to imrpove the European Union's external policy:
    a) Looking at concrete measures to more generally improve the functioning of the European Union's external policy, the European Council calls for a more integrated approach, ensuring that all relevant EU and national instruments and policies are fully and coherently mobilised, consistent with the provisions of the Treaties, in support of the European Union's strategic interests. The importance of issues like climate change, energy policy, trade, development or Justice and Home Affairs issues, including migration and visa policy in dealings with partners and at a multilateral level must be fully taken into account in preparations for summits and international events. In this regard the European Union should further enhance the coherence and complementarity between its internal and external policies. The practice of holding orientation debates well before summits should be further developed, with a particular emphasis on setting priorities and concrete tasking.
    b) Synergies need to be developed between the European Union's external relations and Member States bilateral relations with third countries, so that, where appropriate, what is done at the level of the European Union complements and reinforces what is done at the level of the Member States and vice versa. There should be more active and regular sharing of information and consultation on developments at the respective levels, on the basis of a running calendar of EU and Member States' summits with major strategic partners.
    c) Close and regular coordination between all the different institutional actors involved in the definition and implementation of the European Union's external relations is necessary to ensure that EU representatives can defend coherent positions on the whole range of the strategic interests and objectives of the Union.
    d) Much progress has been achieved in the preparation, at the level of the European Union, for multilateral summits, notably through the practical arrangements reached between the President of the European Council and the President of the Commission on the EU representation in the G8 and G20 structures. It invites them to continue to work towards improving the way in which the European Union projects its views in such fora.
    e) The European Union needs a clear picture of the particular issues arising from relations with the individual partner States. It needs to develop medium-term planning that sets out objectives to be reached over time, with each summit concentrating on two or three core issues. The European Council therefore asks the High Representative, in coordination with the Commission and with the Foreign Affairs Council, to evaluate the prospects of relations with all strategic partners, and set out in particular our interests and possible leverage to achieve them. The High Representative is invited to present a first progress report on this work to the December 2010 European Council. In this context, there should be a reflection on the frequency, format and output of those summits, which need to be better targeted towards reaching EU objectives. The European Council invites its President, in cooperation with the President of the Commission and the High Representative, to take any necessary initiatives with a view to improving the process.
    f) The European External Action Service will be a crucial tool in support of the efforts towards enhancing the European Union's external policy. At service level, it will, under the authority of the High Representative, provide support to the European Council, the Council and the Commission concerning the strategic overview and coordination necessary to ensure the coherence of the European Union's external action as a whole.

    SOurce: Council of the EUropean Union


    Link Read more
    Link European external action service


  5. Africa-EU Energy Partnership
    2010-09-24
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Environment

    The first High-Level Meeting (HLM) of the Africa-EU Energy Partnership (AEEP) took place on 14-15 September 2010, in Vienna, Austria, to discuss energy access, energy security and renewable energy. The meeting was co-organized by the: African Union (AU) Commission; European Commission (EC); Federal Ministry for European and International Affairs, Austria; Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ), Germany; and Government of Mauritius. Main themes during the HLM included: the need to recognize energy as one of the keys to achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs); the role of public and private sector finance and new financial instruments; the importance of a stable energy supply for economic and industrial development; the need for capacity building and knowledge creation on the potential of renewables; the role of policies and institutions in shaping stable and conducive investment environments; and the special attention needed to supply energy to the poor.

    Source: International Institute for Sustainable Development

     


    Link Read more
    Link Africa-Europe Energy Partnership


  6. Irish lead EU in donations to development aid charities
    2010-09-24

    A greater percentage of Irish people give money to developing countries than any other EU nationality, new research suggests. However, Europeans as a whole are less willing than they were a year ago to donate to poorer countries. Some 61 per cent of Irish respondents to a poll by Eurostat, the EU’s statistical arm, said they gave money to an organisation helping developing countries but were not active volunteers. The Irish were closely followed by the respondents in Sweden, 58 per cent of whom said they gave money to developing countries. A total of 1,008 Irish respondents were interviewed by pollsters in June. The survey was conducted to gauge the public commitment to development aid in view of the economic crisis. “While countries are fighting against soaring unemployment rates and introducing austerity measures in order to restore growth, development aid was expected to be one of the evident scapegoats losing importance when the minds of Europeans are occupied with issues closer to home,” said a commentary with the research. The research did not suggest that economic turmoil was passing without a trace. While people were more generally aware of the importance of giving aid, “the more concrete question on the acceptable level of EU development aid reveals that, when it comes to money, people are not as willing as they were 12 months ago to pass it to poorer countries”. Nevertheless, the pollsters said Europeans remained staunch supporters of development aid and continued to back the EU strategy of increasing aid as promised.

    Source: Irishtimes


    Link Read more
    Link Irish Aid


  7. Caribbean: EPA Not so Momentous After All, Study Says
    2010-09-24
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade

    Almost two years after the controversial and sweeping trade pact known as an Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) was signed between the European Union and the Caribbean Forum (CARIFORUM) countries, a new study says the impact of the EPA has proved to be, as its proponents claimed, relatively mild."None of the critics set out to test the propositions made by the EPA's negotiators that the fiscal impacts might not be so grave and that revenues lost to new imports would be offset by access to new markets," the study says. Conducted by the Jamaica-based Caribbean Policy Research Institute (CaPRI) and the Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI), the study found that, contrary to claims that the agreement would prove disastrous for Caribbean economies, the economic effects on the four countries studied - Jamaica, Guyana, Trinidad and Tobago, and St. Lucia - would likely be minimal. The researchers found that Jamaica, for instance, stands to improve its trade balance with Europe, if only marginally.
     

    Source: Inter Press News Service Agency


    Link Read more
    Link EU-Caribbean relations
    Link EPA-Caribbean


  8. Europeans and the Millennium Development Goals
    2010-09-24

    Since 1973, the European Commission has been conducting surveys on public opinion in the Member States addressing major topics concerning European citizenship. This report examines European public opinion on development policy in general and the EU’s role as aid donor in particular. Over 26,500 people living in the 27 EU member states were surveyed in June 2010. The results of the survey can be seen as a barometer of current European attitudes toward development in view of two forthcoming events. European citizens continue to show resolute support to aid provided to developing countries. One week before the UN High Level Meeting on the Millennium Development Goals, the survey shows that 89% of respondents consider development aid is important or very important. Two in three Europeans believe that the EU should honor, or even improve, on its promises to increase development aid to 0.7% of GNI by 2015, the deadline for achieving the Millennium Development Goal. This support, shared by a vast majority of citizens regardless of the nationality, has remained consistently high despite the financial crisis and the economic situation in Europe. In this context, three quarters (76%) of Europeans believe that there is added value in EU countries working together which contributes to avoid duplication and ensure aid effectiveness.

    Source: European Commission


    Link Read more
    Link MDGs
    Link EU Development Policy


  9. The EPA: Towards a New Era for Caribbean Trade
    2010-09-23
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade

    This latest paper in the CIGI’s series on Caribbean Economic Governance examines the likely effects of the EPA between Caribbean countries and the European Union (EU), after decades of agreements that guaranteed markets and preferential prices for Caribbean exports. This paper finds the economic effects on the countries studied – Jamaica, Guyana, Trinidad and Tobago, and St. Lucia – will likely be minimal, despite the fierce opposition to and criticism of the EPA when it was adopted in October 2008, predicting that it will be disastrous for Caribbean economies,. This paper emphasizes that to benefit fully from the EPA, Caribbean countries will need to proceed with plans for the Caribbean Single Market Economy (CSME). The EPA can, therefore, provide the framework that will allow the Caribbean to compete in a liberalized global economy.

    Source: Cigionline.org


    Link Read more
    Link Economic partnerships


  10. Commission plans climate targets for 2030, 2050
    2010-09-23
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Environment

    The European Commission has started working on climate targets above and beyond 2020, arguing that they will be instrumental in fending off competition from leading clean-tech industries in China and elsewhere, according to EU Climate Action Commissioner Connie Hedegaard. Hedegaard said she is working with her colleagues in the European Commission's energy and transport departments to define climate targets for 2030. The targets would be included in a 2050 roadmap for a low-carbon economy, which the Commission will set out in spring 2011, the commissioner told business leaders at the European Policy Centre (EPC) yesterday (14 September). The EU currently has an objective of slashing greenhouse-gas emissions and boosting renewable energies by 20% by 2020. But the issue of emissions reduction and renewable energy targets are likely to reopen a Pandora's box that could require tough negotiations among reluctant EU member states. Agreeing on a package of legislation to meet the EU's 2020 targets was a matter of fierce internal argument among EU countries until a compromise was finally struck in December 2008. The Parliament sealed the deal with only mixed enthusiasm.

    Source: Euractiv


    Link Read more
    Link Environment DG


  11. European Earth observation programme
    2010-09-23
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Rural development

    The Council adopted a regulation on the European Earth observation programme (GMES) and its initial operations (2011-2013), following an agreement reached with the European Parliament in first reading.
    The regulation will contribute to the establishment of GMES as an operational programme, and will provide additional funds for its initial operations enabling a gradual build-up of capabilities until 2013, as well as putting into place the necessary structures for the governance of the programme. It includes an additional EUR 107 million in the initial operational phase of GMES, as proposed by the Commission in May 2009 GMES is an EU-led initiative to develop Europe's own operational Earth observation capacity in order to collect information about the planet’s physical, chemical and biological systems and, more generally, to monitor the natural environment. It draws on both space-based (i.e. satellite) and nonspace- based facilities, including airborne, seaborne and ground-based ("in situ") installations. Data collected via satellites and in situ infrastructure are processed to provide information services
    allowing better management of the environment and enhancing security for citizens.

    Source: Council of the European Union


    Link Read more
    Link GMES


  12. European External Action Service
    2010-09-23

    The Council adopted its position on draft amending budget no.6 to the EU's general budget for 2010, approving the creation of a new section X in the budget for the European External Action Service (EEAS) with the appropriate budgetary structure and establishment plan. The draft amending budget involves the transfer of posts from other institutions (411 from the European Council and the Council, 1114 from the Commission), as well as the creation of 100 new posts and the recruitment of 60 local agents and 10 contract agents. The net financial impact amounts to EUR 9.52 million. The Council adopted a statement emphasising that the establishment of the EEAS should be guided by the principle of cost efficiency aiming towards budget neutrality.

    Source: Council of the European Union


    Link Read more
    Link European external action service


  13. Support for ACP banana exporting countries
    2010-09-23
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade

    The 3032nd Council meeting on General Affairs held in Brussels on 13 September 2010 adopted its position on draft amending budget no.3 to the EU's general budget for 2010, approving the financing of EUR 56.7 million to help African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) banana exporting countries affected by liberalisation measures required by the World Trade Organisation. This amount will be secured by redeployments within heading 4 ("the EU as a global player") and from the margin of the same heading. Concerning the possible financing of a further EUR 18.3 million for ACP bananas supplier countries, the Council asked the Commission to propose as soon as possible additional redeployments within heading 4.

    Source: Council of the European Union


    Link Read more
    Link Banana Market
    Link Bananas


  14. International Investment Policy- Views from the EU Council
    2010-09-22
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade

    The 31st Council meeting on Foreign Affairs held in Brussels on September 2010  took note of the presentation by the Commission of a communication on the development of an EU policy on international investments and It held an exchange of views. Globalisation has seen a dramatic increase of capital movements in recent years; in 2007, FDI flows reached a record high of almost EUR 1.5 billion. Under article 207 of the Treaty of Lisbon, which entered into force in December 2009, foreign direct investment (FDI) is a policy area of exclusive EU competence as part of its common commercial policy. Until now, the member states have negotiated bilateral investment treaties with third countries. As a first step in addressing the effects of this new EU competence, the Commission presented in July a policy package comprising the communication and a proposal for a regulation aimed at establishing transitional arrangements for the member states bilateral investment treaties. The communication addresses issues such as the definition of FDI, the criteria for selecting prospective negotiating partners, standards for future investment agreements at EU level and the settlement of disputes. During the course of the Council's discussion, delegations highlighted the need to put into place as soon as possible a comprehensive and efficient framework for investment agreements at EU level. They underscored the need, in doing so, to ensure legal certainty for operators, as well as predictability and maximum protection for EU investors abroad, and to maintain the EU as an attractive destination for investment.

    Source: Council of the European Union


    Link Read more
    Link Q&A on EU Investment Policy


  15. 11th meeting of the EU–South Africa Cooperation
    2010-09-22
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade

    The 3032nd Council meeting on General Affairs held in Brussels on 13 September 2010 took note of preparations for the 11th meeting of the EU–South Africa Cooperation Council, to be held in Pretoria on 15 September. The Cooperation Council is expected to address progress in development cooperation and a midterm review of the EU-South Africa development cooperation instrument programme. It will also take stock of trade developments and assess progress in an ongoing revision of the EU-South Africa trade, development and cooperation agreement.

    Source: Council of the European Union


    Link Read more
    Link EU Trade with South Africa
    Link EuropeAid and South Africa


  16. EPA: views from the EU Council
    2010-09-22
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade

    The 31st Council meeting on Foreign Affairs held in Brussels on September 2010 held an exchange of views on the situation and the way forward as regards the negotiation of economic partnership agreements (EPAs) with African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) countries and regions. It took note of suggestions by the Commission for adjusting the EU's negotiation strategy so as to reinvigorate the negotiation process.

    Source: Council of the European Union


    Link Read more
    Link DG Trade on EPAs


  17. Growing coalition urges to move on a Financial Transaction Tax
    2010-09-22
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Aid effectiveness

    A broad coalition calling for an European-wide Financial Transaction Tax (FTT) staged an action outside the meeting of EU Finance Ministers on the 7th  September, in Brussels. The group, made up of NGOs, political organisations and trade unions, called on EU Ministers to recognise the merits of an FTT, particularly as austerity measures begin to be felt throughout the EU.The coalition was concerned about the European Commission ‘non-paper’ tabled for discussion by Tax Commissioner Algirdas Šemeta and urged Ministers to dismiss its negative assessment. Whereas the EC document questions the feasibility of an FTT without giving detailed reasons, a leaked paper by the International Monetary Fund and leading economists do state this sort of tax is possible. The coalition staged an action to represent what is at stake, pitting greedy bankers against actors representing the developing world, workers in Europe and the environment. Some 200 billion Euros could be raised from an EU-wide transaction tax, according to the Austrian Institute of Economic Research. Campaigners believe that part of this money should support public services at home, fight overseas poverty and fight climate change.

    Source: Solidar


    Link Read more
    Link The Parameters of a Financial Transaction Tax


  18. Foreign citizens made up 6.4% of the EU27 population
    2010-09-22
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Archive

    On 1 January 2009, 31.9 million foreign citizens1 lived in the EU27 Member States, of which 11.9 million were citizens of another EU27 Member State. The remaining were citizens of countries outside the EU27, in particular from other European countries (7.2 million), Africa (4.9 million), Asia (4.0 million) and the American continent (3.3 million). Foreign citizens accounted for 6.4% of the total EU27 population.
    This News Release is based on a report2 by Eurostat, the statistical office of the European Union, on foreign citizens in the EU27 Member States, EFTA and Candidate countries.

    Source: Eurostat


    Link Read more
    Link International Organization for Migration


  19. Fifty years for the Special Committee on Agriculture
    2010-09-22
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Rural development

    On 9 September 2010, the Special Committee on Agriculture (SCA) of the Council celebrated its 50th anniversary. The SCA is the body which prepares the work of the Agriculture Council, notably for all aspects concerning the common market organisation, agricultural structures and rural development. The SCA has played a central part in the original design and periodic reform of the CAP. The CAP remains one of the cornerstones of European construction. It accounts for a significant share of total EU expenditure, represents a large part of the total body of EU law, and has a direct impact on the lives of many millions of EU citizens. The SCA usually meets weekly on Mondays. Member States are represented in this committee by senior officials responsible for agricultural policy either in their respective permanent representations or in their capitals. As with Council meetings, the European
    Commission participates in all SCA meetings. The General Secretariat of the Council assists the Committee and its specialised working parties in their tasks.  In addition to CSA, the Committee for Permanent Representatives (COREPER) prepares the Agriculture Council’s work when financial issues or technical measures on veterinary, phytosanitary of food legislation have to be discussed. Unlike the COREPER whose origin lies in the EEC Treaty from 1957, the SCA was set up by a Council Decision of 12 May 1960 on the acceleration of the rate of attainment of the Treaty with particular reference to the CAP. The then six Member States considered it necessary for this task to be entrusted
    to a specialised body.

    Source: Council of the European Union


    Link Read more
    Link Agriculture and Fisheries Council
    Link Coreper


  20. ECOWAS lawmakers caution on EU trade pact
    2010-09-22
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade

    Lawmakers in the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) have cautioned against any decision to open up the region’s market “too wide and hastily” to the European Union (EU) as part of the concession for reaching a trade agreement between the two regions. Both regions have since 2003 been negotiating a World Trade Organisation (WTO)-compliant Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) for the creation of a free trade area that would define their trade and economic relations for the next 20 years. The lawmakers urged regional leaders to “strongly defend their position” regarding the proposal by the EU for the scrapping of ECOWAS levies imposed on imports into the region from third countries as they constitute independent sources of financing regional integration as well as funding the Community’s activities and the West African Economic and Monetary Union (UEMOA). Concerned about the multiplicity of trade regimes in the region, the legislators underscored the need for an impact assessment of the recent agreements on regional integration, stressing that efforts should be made for the speedy conclusion of the EPA negotiations in order to remove the stumbling block the two agreements pose to the region.

    Source: Trade Law Center for Southern Africa


    Link Read more
    Link ECOWAS
    Link ECOWAS-EPA


  21. Piebalgs partners with UNESCO to support poverty reduction
    2010-09-22

    Today, Andris Piebalgs, the European Commissioner for Development, ahead of the High-Level Round Table on Culture and Development, signed an agreement with UNESCO for a €1 million Expert Facility to support governance of the cultural sector. This facility will allow the governments of developing countries to take advantage of experts' knowledge in developing effective and sustainable cultural policies. It will contribute to implementation of the 2005 UNESCO Convention on the Protection and Promotion of the Diversity of Cultural Expressions. EU Commissioner for Development, Andris Piebalgs said: "This €1 million facility will help to support a vibrant cultural sector in developing countries. Culture is a key factor to ensure a sustainable, human and economic development". The European Commission was a major player in the negotiations of the Convention and has been deeply committed in promoting cultural diversity in EU's cooperation with partner countries all over the world. Today, Commissioner Piebalgs will co-chair the High-Level Round Table on Culture and Development together with Irina Bokova, the Director General of UNESCO and Jean Ping, the President of the African Union Commission. Organised at the time, when world leaders meet in New York to discuss progress made on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the Round Table will discuss the role that culture plays in development policy and achieving the MDGs. Among other participants at the Round Table will be - Minister for Culture of the French Speaking Community of Belgium and serving President of the EU's Culture Council, Fadila Lanaan who shares the Commissioner's position and stresses the importance of the cultural dimension of development.

    Source: European Commission


    Link Read more
    Link Culture in EU development cooperation
    Link Culture in the EU's external cooperation


  22. Genemark: helping Africa to take care of itself
    2010-09-22
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Archive

    With the help of Investisseur & Partenaire pour le Développement (I&P Développement), an investment company in which the EIB is a shareholder, in 2003 Gisèle Étamé established GENEMARK, Cameroon's only generic drugs laboratory. Her aim was to bring down the selling price of quality generic drugs on local markets and ensure that they were immediately available. The drugs market in Africa is stymied by a number of handicaps: fraudulent imports, counterfeit drugs, the black market, weak distribution channels, etc. Generic drugs in Africa, which account for some 20% of the market, come mainly from India and China. As a pharmaceutical doctor with 15 years' experience in a number of internationally renowned laboratories, 45-year old Gisèle Étamé wished to set up her own laboratory in the Yassa district of Douala. GENEMARK was founded in 2003 and produces four major generic drug families (anti-infectives, anti-parasitics, anti-inflammatories and food supplements) in the form of tablets and syrups. The company's flagship product is quinine syrup. Unlike capsules which must be broken to be administered and taken with water that is not always drinkable, syrup is perfect for treating children with malaria. Paracetamol and multivitamins are also produced in this form.

    Source: European Investment Bank


    Link Read more
    Link EU Relations with Cameroon


  23. World trade likely to grow by 13.5% in 2010
    2010-09-22
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade

    Following faster than expected recovery in global trade flows so far in 2010, WTO economists have revised their projection for world trade growth in 2010 upwards to 13.5%. Director-General Pascal Lamy said: “This surge in trade flows provides the means to climb out of this painful economic recession and can help put people back to work. It underscores, as well, the wisdom governments have shown in rejecting protectionism.” Following faster than expected recovery in global trade flows so far in 2010, WTO economists have revised their projection for world trade growth in 2010 upwards to 13.5%. The WTO's March forecast was a 10% expansion in trade volumes. Merchandise exports of developed economies are predicted to expand by 11.5% in volume terms while the rest of the world (including developing economies and the Commonwealth of Independent States) is expected to see an increase of 16.5% for the year.

    Source: The World Trade Organization

     


    Link Read more
    Link International trade and tariff data
    Link ACP-EU Trade


  24. ECOWAS urges caution on EU trade deal
    2010-09-20
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade

    Representatives of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) have cautioned against any decision to open up the region’s market “too wide and too hastily” to the European Union (EU) as part of the concession for reaching an economic partnership agreement (EPA) between the two regions. Negotiations have been underway since 2003 and once signed they “will determine trade relations between the two regions for the next 20 years,” added the representatives who have been meeting in Accra since the beginning of September this year, according to a press release received by Ouestafnews. “The representatives expressed concern about the potential impact on the production capacities in the region as a result of opening 70 percent of the region’s markets.” They also cautioned against scrapping ECOWAS levies imposed on imports into the region from third countries as they constitute’ independent sources of financing regional integration as well as funding the Community’s activities. The EPA negotiations have been the toughest test of strength between the EU and Africa since the independence period, and remain unsigned, despite having long passed the EU deadline. A strong movement of resistance among civil society and various other stakeholders who fear for the survival of a weak African industrial base should the agreements come into effect have largely contributed to blocking progress in the negotiations. In addition, both in Africa and beyond, experts have criticized the approach and the unequal power relationships in the negotiation process. “The organization of these negotiations has simply reinforced the inequalities of economic power between the EU and the ACP (African, Caribbean and Pacific groups of countries),” noted Ablassé Ouédraogo from Burkina Faso. The ACP countries “divided into little groups are taking on the most powerful and experienced negotiating structure, the European Commission,” he added. “The term “partnership” suggests that it is an agreement between equals, but the reality is that the less developed countries and the EU cannot be equal partners,” according to American economist, Joseph Stiglitz. Trade between the EU and West Africa is estimated to be worth 15 billion euros and is considered by the European Commission to be “globally balanced”. The EU exports mainly industrial products and vehicles (80 percent of exports), whereas West African exports are principally made up of petrol from Nigeria (50 percent of West African exports) and tropical agricultural products (cocoa, bananas, pineapples and timber) coming mainly from Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana. Since the independence years fifty years ago, most African countries have generally been quick to sign agreements offered by Europe, the continent of former colonial powers, sometimes to the detriment of the interests of the majority of Africans. According to analysts, the emergence of new economic powers on the world stage, while not completely overthrowing the old relationships of power, has certainly offered a new alternative to the African continent.

    Source: Ouestaf.com


    Link Read more
    Link ECOWAS EPA
    Link EPA


  25. BTC awarded ISO 9001 certification
    2010-09-20
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Aid effectiveness

    On 23 August 2010, the Belgian Development Agency, BTC, was accredited with ISO 9001 certification in recognition of the agency’s high standard of quality control. This award should lead to improved satisfaction among clients. ISO certification is a relatively new phenomenon in the development sector, and BTC is only the second European development agency to be awarded this type of quality assessment (the other agency is Lux-Development in Luxembourg). Certification sends a strong signal to Belgian and international donors and partners of our commitment to developing countries, and responds to recent demands within the international community for greater oversight and results-oriented aid. Consequently, BTC is firmly committed to the professionalization of the development sector. The Belgian agency has increased its funds for bilateral cooperation each year (237 million euros in 2009), and since 2008, BTC has been authorized to work directly with the European Commission. BTC is also increasingly involved in development projects financed by other countries than Belgium. “Inspiring confidence through the quality of our services is a key element of our mission at BTC. Our agency is convinced that the ISO certification will further develop the relationship of trust that we have built with our principal donors and partners,” stated Director-General Carl Michiels. The current ISO certification is only the first step in a process that is planned to last several years. The certification, audited by AIB Vinçotte in June 2010, applies to the headquarters in Brussels. In 2011, BTC plans to extend the certification to the first of its representative offices, with the subsequent goal of certifying all 18 representative offices.

    Source: Belgian Development Agency


    Link Read more
    Link EU Presidency of the EU


  26. Development: Increased assistance and effectiveness
    2010-09-20
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Aid effectiveness

    Last Thursday Belgian Development Minister Charles Michel was smiling as if he had just got a good report: “I feel like a student who passed his first-term exams, thanks to the political support and the support of all the stakeholders.”
    The Development Assistance Committee (DAC) of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), which is composed of 32 industrialized countries, recently commended Belgium for its reforms in development assistance. Every four or five years the overseas development programme of each member state is subjected to a peer evaluation. The previous two evaluations in 2001 and 2005 had not been very positive. Since then, however, Belgium has set things straight. “Belgium can be proud of its generosity towards development aid,” said DAC President, Eckhard Deutsche, especially during this period of economic crisis. In 2009, Belgium contributed USD 2.6 billion on official development assistance, amounting to 0.55% of its gross national income, and is further committed to increase this figure to 0.7% this year, although there are doubts about the exact timeframe. At that point, Belgium will join the club of five countries that have already reached this objective.
    Greater resources required
    The DAC President continued by pointing out that “Belgium is approaching 0.7 as a result of recent debt write-offs. It is possible that these will be less significant in the future and that it will therefore be necessary to increase resources for development.” According to the OECD report, Belgium has managed to increase aid effectiveness by streamlining its procedures. The report also commends agreements made between the ministry and universities and NGOs, which has led to greater impact.
    However, several areas still require attention: “There is still a lack of a shared vision among all actors,” according to Mr Deutsche, “due to the large number of different levels of authority in Belgium! All that costs money. More power should be put in the hands of those on the ground, and their practical experience should be used to greater advantage. In addition, given that Belgium’s special focus is on a “fragile” area like the Great Lakes Region, it should include all ministries in order to create a more comprehensive programme that addresses peace and security, development, institutional capacity and poverty reduction.”
    What would happen if Belgium broke up? “That would certainly lead to reduced effectiveness,” added Deutsche. “In Germany we have 16 federal states that are involved in development, but policies are not coordinated, which causes problems for the recipient countries, having to deal with a multitude of different agencies in the health sector, for example. This kind of fragmentation is counterproductive!”

    Source: Revue de presse de l'Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie




  27. The world's first project network for CO2 Capture and Storage
    2010-09-20

    The European Commission today completed the launch of the EU tool that supports early large-scale demonstration of CO2 capture and storage (CCS) technologies. The CCS Project Network is the world's first network of CCS demonstration projects to foster knowledge sharing and raise public understanding of the role of CCS in cutting CO2 emissions. This will accelerate learning and ensure that the Commission can assist CCS to safely fulfil its potential and become a commercially viable technology. Energy Commissioner Günther Oettinger said: "CCS is one of the key technologies that we need to develop today to make the necessary deep cuts in carbon dioxide emissions from the energy sector in the coming decades. It is a very positive step forward for the major project developers in Europe to work together and to inform scientists, industry and the public about their progress. Knowledge sharing will be essential for accelerating the deployment of clean energy technologies in Europe and worldwide." The first network members who have signed a joint agreement to share knowledge are all CCS projects supported by the European Commission's European Energy Programme for Recovery (EEPR). As a condition for receiving EU funding each beneficiary is required to disseminate the project results as widely as possible. The goal is to create a prominent community of projects united in the goal of achieving commercially viable CCS by 2020. To guarantee that the work of the CCS Project Network is valuable to the wider energy community in Europe, an annual Advisory Forum has been established to review progress and specify the knowledge that can most usefully be generated by the CCS Project Network activities. Today's meeting is the first Advisory Forum, co-chaired by the European Commission and the European Technology Platform for Zero Emission Fossil Fuel Power Plants (ZEP) with representatives of Member States, ZEP, CCS demonstration projects, the research and NGO communities, and international organisations.

    Source: European Commission


    Link Read more
    Link CCS Project Network


  28. Africa-EU Renewable Energy Cooperation Programme
    2010-09-20

    Africa and Europe have a common interest in accelerating the use of renewable energy resources and have much to gain from a joint approach to the development of renewable energy, an essential component of a global approach to meeting the energy needs of industry, transport, buildings and households without adversely affecting the climate. The two continents share a commitment to a significant expansion of renewable energy in the energy balance, in order to reduce the dependency on fossil fuels, contribute to improved energy security and access, and form the backbone of a future low-carbon energy system. With its very low per capita energy use, mitigation of climate change is less of an issue for Africa than for Europe. For Africa, with its abundant resources, renewable energy could play a major role in meeting the continent's rapidly growing need for energy to expand access, to power economic growth and to promote social progress. The Africa-EU Energy Partnership (AEEP) was launched in Lisbon in December 2007, as a long-term framework for structured political dialogue and cooperation on energy issues of strategic importance. Energy access, energy security and renewable energy are the three priority areas, each with a specific target. On renewable energy, Africa and Europe have agreed on ambitious political targets for the partnership, notably to increase the use of renewable energy in Africa: for the year 2020, an additional 10,000 MW of hydro-power, 5,000 MW of wind energy, and 500 MW of other renewable energies.

    Source: Partenariat Afrique-UE pour l’énergie


    Link Read more
    Link Africa-EU Energy Partnership
    Link Europafrica



===========================================================
Please feel free to forward this newsletter to other interested colleagues.

Isolina BOTO
CTA
39 rue Montoyer
1000 Brussels
Belgium
Tel 02 513 74 36
Fax 02 511 38 68
http://www.cta.int/
http://bruxelles.cta.int/

Wemaster: Serge Kamuhinda (kamuhinda@cta.int)

NOTE
If you have questions or suggestions, please write to us at : boto@cta.int
For more information on the full range of CTA activities please go to http://www.cta.int/
More information on CTA activities in Brussels at : http://brussels.cta.int/
CTA is an institution of the ACP Group of States (Africa, Caribbean and Pacific) and the EU (European Union), in the framework of the Cotonou Agreement and is financed by the EU.
Copyright © 2009 Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation ACP-EU. Email:cta@cta.int
The opinions expressed in the comments and analysis are those of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views of CTA.

You are currently subscribed to the CTA Brussels Newsletter.

Your subscription :

===========================================================


 

 

1