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[CTA - Brussels Office Newsletter N° 235]
Subject: [CTA - Brussels Office Newsletter N° 235]
Send date: 2010-08-06 14:56:03
Issue #: 51
Content:
Bulletin CTA
1

This weblog shares information on key ACP-EU programmes and events
from Brussels relevant to agriculture and rural development in ACP countries.


Date : [DATE]
CTA Brussels Newsletter

Main events in the week
  1. Financing Agriculture
  2. Land access, land acquisitions and rural development
  3. Why enhance domestic resource mobilisation in Africa?
  4. Taxation for development in Africa: A shared responsibility
  5. EU shows growth in ethanol production, use
  6. EU Backs Off on EPA
  7. Europe Clears Import of New Biotech Corn Varieties
  8. Fears over Europe's GM crop plan
  9. Malawi Stands Firm on Conditions for Signing EPA
  10. EC requests further funding to respond to the worsening food crisis
  11. EU invests 20 million euros into COMRAP
  12. UK pledges €15.5m for new research
  13. Malawi maintains 'no' stand on EPAs
  14. Securing Greater : Participation for Africa in World Trade
  15. FP7 Calls for Proposals 2011 published
  16. Scientific Cooperation between the EU, Latin America and the Caribbean
  17. Europe heat wave sparks surge in grain prices
  18. Trade in endangered species
  19. European External Action Service
  20. EC to provide €250 million for more than 200 new LIFE+ projects


  1. Financing Agriculture
    2010-08-06
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade, Rural development, Aid effectiveness, Environment, Archive, Regional Fisheries, Food Security

    The 20th Brussels Development Briefing will be on ‘Financing agriculture and will take place on the 15th of  September 2010. As an input to the UN Summit on MDGs to be held in New York on 22-26 September 2010, we will discuss issues related  to financing development in the context of agriculture and rural development. This will include issue such as Aid and ODA, taxation (Domestic tax revenues), private investment (new donors), revenue generation. Speakers include: Centre for Environmental Policy at  Imperial College in London, the  Partnership to Cut Hunger and Poverty in Africa in the US, CONCORD, OECD, African Development Bank, Caribbean Development Bank, YARA, African regional framers organizations.


    For more information please contact: lopes@cta.int or boto@cta.int


    Link Brussels Development Briefings
    Link Videos of the last Briefing
    Link Past Briefings


  2. Land access, land acquisitions and rural development
    2010-08-06
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade, Rural development, Aid effectiveness, Environment, Archive, Regional Fisheries, Food Security

    Land is an asset of enormous importance for billions of rural dwellers in the developing world, and especially in ACP countries. The nature of property rights and their degree of security vary greatly, depending on competition for land, the degree of market penetration and the broader institutional and political context. Although there are specificities according to countries and regions, some general trends and common challenges can be identified and the pressure on land is set to increase over future decades, given the impacts of population growth, urbanisation, globalisation of markets, international investment flows, trade negotiations and climate change.

    The Rural Development Briefing in Central Africa on “Land access, land acquisitions and rural development: New challenges, new opportunities”  to be held in Yaoundé, Cameroun on 27-28th September 2010 will discuss the links between property rights, investment and economic opportunities in rural areas: Policy and Governance on Land and Forests Resources; the Land acquisition and its contribution to development and the Promotion of responsible agricultural transnational investments. The target group is more than 130 policy makers from Central Africa and other African countries.
    For further information, please contact: boto@cta.int or verginelli@cta.int


    Link Programme.pdf

  3. Why enhance domestic resource mobilisation in Africa?
    2010-08-05
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Aid effectiveness

    Developing countries that have achieved and sustained high rates of growth have typically done so largely through the mobilisation of their domestic resources. Domestic resource mobilisation (DRM) at a significant level is essential to solidify ownership over development strategy and to strengthen the bonds of accountability between governments and their citizens. In effect, DRM provides “policy space” to developing countries which is often constrained under the terms and conditions of external resource providers. Foreign aid comes with conditionality or policy strings attached, not to mention procurement restrictions that accompany “tied aid”. Aid also tends to be pro-cyclical and volatile. Foreign direct investment typically flows into sectors and projects dictated by the commercial interests of the foreign investors - for example, natural resource extraction. Moreover, governments that are heavily dependent on foreign aid, or on sharing the profits of foreign investors, have less incentive to raise taxes and less reason to pay attention to the demands of taxpaying citizens.

    Source: International Centre for Trade and Sustainable Development

     


    Link Read more
    Link Communication on taxation and development
    Link Financing for Development


  4. Taxation for development in Africa: A shared responsibility
    2010-08-05
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Aid effectiveness

    Africa needs more effective, efficient and fairer taxation systems. As several African nations celebrate 50 years of independence in 2010, it is time for a continent that still relies too much on often volatile and unpredictable external flows to take a new look at taxes - a potential untapped source of billions of dollars. While the primary responsibility lies with African governments, the international community must also play its part. And this time, it’s hardly about aid.

    The global economic crisis has shown, yet again, how vulnerable Africa remains to falling commodity prices and export revenues, uncertain future aid flows and declines of foreign direct investment (FDI), which resulted in a general shortfall of external finance. At the same time, the continent continues to suffer from an acute hemorrhage of capital. Indeed, Kar et Cartright-Smith (2008) estimate that Africa lost US$854 billion, at least, in illicit financial outflows from 1970 through 2008. In other words, while Africa is overly-reliant on external financing, it is a net creditor to the world. The case is clear: African economies need to mobilise their domestic resources better. This is in large part the job of governments, who mobilise public resources through taxation (and debt) to fund investment in roads, power plants, schools, health facilities, etc. Over the long term, effective taxation can not only reduce a country’s dependence upon aid and largely unpredictable external finance flows, but it will also increase its ownership of the development agenda, and lay the foundation of a social contract between state, citizens and firms.

    Source: Internationa Center for Trade and Sustainable Development


    Link Read more
    Link Tax and development
    Link Financing for Development


  5. EU shows growth in ethanol production, use
    2010-08-04
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Environment, ACP-EU Trade

    After strong growth approaching 60 percent in 2008, European fuel ethanol production continued to increase growing 31 percent in 2009. “This gives a clear signal to all doubters that European bioethanol is here to stay and to fulfill its increasingly important role in curbing greenhouse gas emissions and in contributing to energy security,” eBIO, the European ethanol association, said in releasing the numbers. Total EU production in 2009 was an estimated 3.7 billion liters up from 2.8 billion liters the previous year (980 million gallons and 740 million gallons, respectively). Several countries increased their ethanol fuel production considerably in 2009. The biggest producer is still France with an annual output in 2009 of 1.250 billion liters, an increase of 25 percent compared to 2008. The second largest producing country is Germany, which constantly increased its production by 32 percent to 750 million liters (568 in 2008). Third biggest producer remained Spain with 465 million liters (up 46 percent compared to 2008). In six out of 18 producing member states, the production declined while 10 increased production volumes and eight remained steady. Notably in 2009, Austria and Sweden more than doubled their fuel ethanol output. Austria’s 102 percent growth ranks it fourth in EU production and Sweden’s 124 percent growth puts it in fifth place.

    Source: bioenergy.checkbiotech.org


    Link Read more
    Link eBIO
    Link EU Biofuels


  6. EU Backs Off on EPA
    2010-08-04
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade

    European Union (EU) Trade Commissioner Karel de Gucht has appeased leading European civil society organisations about the negotiations for a Southern African economic partnership agreement (EPA), promising "not to put undue pressure" on countries. According to Marc Maes, trade policy officer at 11.11.11, the move signals an "EPA-fatigue" in Europe. 11.11.11, the Flemish North-South Movement working against poverty, protested about the European Commission’s treatment of Namibia. "The EU has no intention to put undue pressure on Namibia to sign and implement the interim EPA," de Gucht wrote in a response to a Jun 18 letter by 30 influential European civil society organisations (CSOs).  Negotiations for an EPA have dragged on since 2002 when the Cotonou agreement redefined trade relations between the EU and African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) countries according to World Trade Organisation (WTO) directives. In their letter the CSOs argued that Namibia is put under severe pressure by the Europeans to move forward with the negotiations, to the detriment of their development goals. "The signing of the interim EPA would have serious impacts on agricultural and industrial development in Namibia. Among other consequences the country would have to forfeit the policy option of using export taxes on raw materials and an important incentive for value addition of raw materials and as a potentially important new source of income," noted the CSOs.  In his reply de Gucht tried to allay their concerns, stating: "The EU will continue to engage with Namibia, as well as with the whole SADC EPA group in a constructive spirit as in the past. The objective is to negotiate an agreement that serves the region’s best interest." SADC stands for the Southern African Development Community. The commissioner also emphasised the benefits of duty-and-tariff free access for the countries of the region.  But, according to Maes, the realisation has dawned in Europe that the negotiations need to be concluded before the Third Africa-EU summit in November 2010 in Libya.

    Source: Inter Press News Service Agency


    Link Read more
    Link WTO
    Link DG Trade


  7. Europe Clears Import of New Biotech Corn Varieties
    2010-08-04
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Food Security, ACP-EU Trade

    The European Commission on Wednesday approved six genetically modified corn varieties for import to the bloc, another sign of its desire to speed decision-making on the controversial technology.The commission, the executive arm of the European Commission, granted the approvals unilaterally after E.U. farm ministers failed to reach a decision on the applications in June. The approvals, which are valid for 10 years, cover imports for food and animal feed, not for cultivation. “The six adoptions of today are the result of a usual and standard procedure concerning the authorization” of genetically modified crops, the commission said. Last month the commission proposed an overhaul of the bloc’s rules on the cultivation of modified organisms, which if approved would allow member states to decide whether to allow or prohibit such crops in their territories.The proposals followed a commitment last year from the commission’s president, José Manuel Barroso, to give member states greater power in cultivation decisions in a bid to break a deadlock between E.U. governments on the issue.The decisions open the way for fresh imports of the approved corn varieties from countries like the United States, Brazil and Argentina. In June, the commission told E.U. governments that failure to approve the varieties could lead to a repeat of last year’s disruption to animal feed imports.That was caused by the European Union’s zero-tolerance policy on unapproved, genetically modified material in imports. Shipments of animal feed from the United States were refused entry to the bloc after minute traces of unapproved material were discovered in the cargo.The commission has said it will propose a small tolerance margin for unapproved material in imports later this year, but until then the only solution is for the Union to approve varieties individually for import.

    Source: greenbio.checkbiotech.org


    Link Read more
    Link Food and Feed Safety
    Link European Food Safety Authority


  8. Fears over Europe's GM crop plan
    2010-08-04
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Food Security

    After a decade in which just a single genetically modified (GM) crop was approved for commercial planting in the European Union (EU), the European Commission has tried to break the logjam. But its new proposal, which would allow individual member states to choose whether or not to grow an approved GM crop within their borders, is likely to create further uncertainty within the agricultural biotechnology industry.The plan has drawn fire from all sides of the intense debate over GM crops, with industry officials, farmers and anti-GM campaigners all condemning the move.The EU currently takes advice from the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), an independent body based in Parma, Italy, which conducts a risk assessment of each GM organism. The Council of Ministers then makes a decision on the crop that applies to farmers and agribusinesses throughout Europe. But the council's voting system means that opposition by just a few of the 27 member states can block the introduction of a crop, in which case the European Commission makes a final decision. So far, only a potato with modified starch content — Amflora, developed for industrial rather than food use by German chemical company BASF, based in Ludwigshafen am Rhein — has been approved for cultivation in the EU, and 16 other crops are still awaiting final approval.The new measure, announced on 13 July, would allow member states, or even regions within countries, to restrict GM crops, regardless of whether the EFSA has determined they pose no risk to human health or the environment and whether they have been approved by the European Commission. The commission says that, in principle, the new arrangement should make it easier to secure EU-wide approval for crops.

    SOurce: greenbio.checkbiotech.org


    Link Read more
    Link European Food Safety Authority
    Link Amflora


  9. Malawi Stands Firm on Conditions for Signing EPA
    2010-08-04
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade

    The Malawian government has again stood firm in the face of calls by the European Union (EU) to sign an economic partnership agreement (EPA) -- even after top-level EU officials visited the southern Africa to convince it to put pen to paper.The EU delegation, led by the European Commission’s (EC) director for development and EPAs Peter Thompson and EU Ambassador to Malawi Alexander Baum, engaged Malawi’s top trade officials at a two-day meeting on Jul 26 and 27 in the country’s commercial capital, Blantyre. But Malawi has refused to budge. The country’s trade minister, Eunice Kazembe, said at the meeting that Malawi wants to get a clear assurance on how it will benefit from the EPA. She said Malawi is currently at a disadvantage when it comes to trading in terms of an EPA because it is a land-locked and least developed country (LDC) with poor public infrastructure, low labour productivity, inadequate technological capacity and unreliable public utilities.

    Source: Inter Press News Service Agency


    Link Read more
    Link ACP-EU Trade
    Link EU Relations with Mozambique


  10. EC requests further funding to respond to the worsening food crisis
    2010-08-03
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Food Security

    In response to the worsening food crisis affecting the Sahel and Sudan, Commissioner for International Cooperation, Humanitarian Aid and Crisis Response, Kristalina Georgieva announced today that the Commission has proposed an additional €40 million in humanitarian funding to be drawn from the EU budget's Emergency Aid Reserve. €30 million of this would be additional funding for the Sahel and €10 million for Sudan. This extra €30 million will bring the total humanitarian aid funds allocated by the Commission to fighting malnutrition in the Sahel since the end of 2009 to €98 million. The additional funds will be used to boost the humanitarian aid operations carried out by European Commission humanitarian aid partners and will help provide food assistance to over 500,000 extra beneficiaries during the next critical months until harvest time in October. Currently, over 10 million people in the Sahel region are at risk of food insecurity. Of these over 7 million are in Niger and 3 million of these are considered to be severely food insecure and in need of urgent food assistance.

    Source: European Commission


    Link Read more
    Link Q&A on Sahel
    Link Humanitarian Food assistance


  11. EU invests 20 million euros into COMRAP
    2010-08-03
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade, Rural development, Food Security

    The European Union (EU) has invested about 20 million euros into the Common Market for Eastern and Southern African Regional Agro Inputs Programme (COMRAP) meant to help enhance food production and marketing in the region. And Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (Comesa) has come up with a regional agricultural inputs programme meant to enhance food security, productivity and competitiveness through enhancing smallholder farmers’ access to farming inputs. Meanwhile, agriculture deputy minister Allan Mbewe said there was need to deal with the impact of rising food prices in the region as it affects over 60 per cent of its population. During the consultative meeting of the Comesa Region Agro-Inputs Programme, Comesa assistant secretary general-programmes Stephen Karangizi said COMRAP, which was being implemented by the Comesa Specialised Agency on markets and food security, arose from a need to cushion vulnerable households from the impact of sharp rises in food prices that were experienced between 2007 and 2008.

    Source: Postzambia


    Link Read more
    Link COMESA
    Link Trade, regional integration and infrastructure


  12. UK pledges €15.5m for new research
    2010-08-03

    The UK Government is to pump more than £13.5 million (€15.5m) into more than 30 innovative crop protection research projects in a move it hopes will help farmers cope with new European Union regulations. The funding is being coordinated by the UK’s Technology Strategy Board (TSB), a group designed to promote innovation across a wide range of disciplines and which recently launched the Sustainable Agriculture and Food Innovation Platform, which brings together government, industry and researchers. The 32 projects recently granted funding reflect this desire to bring together different partners, as they include more than 100 UK companies, research establishments and other organisations. Including the contributions from the UK companies conducting the research and development, the total value of the projects will exceed £25m (€28.7). More than half of the projects are devoted to potato and horticultural crops, sectors expected to be most affected by the EU’s ‘pesticides package’. They include, for example, a project to develop potato varieties with durable resistance to late blight and nematodes, strategies for quantifying and controlling free-living nematode populations and consequent damage by tobacco rattle virus to improve potato yield and quality, and accelerated introgression of host plant resistance to carrot fly into elite carrot varieties. A number of biocontrol projects are included in the funding, including new bio-fumigation-based approaches to the sustainable control of soil-borne pathogens, alongside areas such as automatic weed mapping in arable fields for precision farming, the molecular improvement of disease resistance in barley and inducing novel broad spectrum disease resistance in wheat. Jim Paice, the UK’s Agriculture and Food Minister, said: “Crop protection is an important issue for UK farmers and growers, so I’m pleased that this is the first area to be targeted by the platform. This competition, to which the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) has contributed £3.5m (€4.1m), will give vital support to farmers following changes to the EU pesticide regulations.”However, the choice of projects and the nature of the ‘competition’ for funding have not been universally welcomed. Critics have pointed out that the projects are designed to produce valuable intellectual property for the partners involved rather than be shared with the industry as a whole. In particular, only one project part-funded by growers through the UK’s levy system was selected. These levies, collected by the Agriculture and Horticultural Development Board (AHDB), are designed to pay for ‘near-market’ research and development and the associated technology transfer, and thus provide benefits for growers. In the horticultural sector, for example, growers generally pay 0.5% of their annual turnover to the Horticultural Development Company, producing an annual research fund of nearly £5m (€5.9m). HDC chairman Neil Bragg told the journal Horticulture Week: “The problem with the projects awarded is they focus on individual companies so they are not in the interest of the horticulture industry as a whole. If that’s the course the Government intends to take so be it but it is of no benefit to us.”

    Source: Endure


    Link Read more
    Link UK’s Technology Strategy Board
    Link Food safety EU


  13. Malawi maintains 'no' stand on EPAs
    2010-08-03
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade

    Industry and Trade Minister Eunice Kazembe on Monday (26th July) reiterated the need for the European Union (EU) to address institutional, infrastructure and capacity factors that have stopped Malawi from taking advantage of previous preferential access to the EU before it can sign the controversial Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs). Kazembe was speaking in Blantyre at the start of a high-level meeting on the role of Malawi in ESA-EPA negotiations. The meeting has attracted government officials, business captains, civil society players and media gurus to discuss some of the challenges affecting Malawi’s signing of the trade pact. She said Malawi’s ability to trade in a way that promotes development is negatively affected by crippling supply-side constraints. “As an LDC [Least Developed Country] and land-locked country, transport costs are extremely high, accounting for up to 50 to 60 percent of total export value. “The country also faces other challenges that include poor public infrastructure, unreliable public utilities, low labour productivity, standards requirements, sanitary and phyto-sanitary measures and inadequate technological capacity to add value to its products. “Malawi anticipates that these challenges will be addressed before full liberalisation,” said Kazembe. In his remarks, EU Ambassador to Malawi Alexander Baum called for the need for more open debate on the country’s trade policy if the country is to forge ahead. He observed that debate on EPAs has been emotional, calling for a need for a more sober debate in as far as EPAs are concerned.

    Source: The Nation


    Link Read more
    Link EU Relations with Malawi
    Link Least-developed countries


  14. Securing Greater : Participation for Africa in World Trade
    2010-08-03
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade

    In a bid to secure a greater participation and accelerate the integration of ACP countries into the world economy, experts from more than 23 Central and West African met at the Hilton Hotel for the 6th coordination meeting that focused exclusively on the closure of the first phase of the project and its evaluation as well as the preparation of the second phase scheduled to start on January 1, 2011. The European Commission, the Commonwealth Secretariat, the International Organisation of the Francophonie (OIF) launched the “Hub and Spokes” project in March 2005 to reinforce the capacities of ACP countries in the formulation, negotiation and execution of commercial policies. Participants included representatives of intergovernmental organisations like the Central African Economic and Monetary Union (CEMAC), the Economic Community of Central African States (ECCAS), the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS), as well as advisers and focal points trained under the project. Introducing the workshop, the Director of Sustainable Development and Solidarity at the OIF, Mr. Tharcisse Urayeneza, explained that the seminar was the last organised in the first phase of the project, which was launched in order to enable 77 ACP countries to negotiate and conclude the Euro-ACP economic and partnership agreements and make of trade a poverty reduction and economic growth tool. On his part, the Minister of Trade, Luc Magloire Mbarga Atangana, stated the benefits that had already accrued from the project. Beneficiary ACP countries enjoyed a better preparation and a more efficient participation in international trade negotiations, especially negotiations with the European Union on economic partnership agreements as well as Doha Round negotiations for the development of international trade.

    Source: Cameroon Tribune


    Link Read more
    Link Hub and Spokes
    Link Trade facilitation


  15. FP7 Calls for Proposals 2011 published
    2010-08-03

    On 20 July 2010 the EU published more than 50 calls for proposals under the 7th Framework Programme for RD&D, worth a total of EUR 6.4 billion. Many of these calls address energy issues.
    Indicative overview of energy-relevant topic across all calls.

    Source: European Commission


    Link Read more
    Link Seventh Framework Programme
    Link DG Research


  16. Scientific Cooperation between the EU, Latin America and the Caribbean
    2010-08-02

    Cooperation with Latin America and the Caribbean receives special attention in the 2011 work programmes of FP7 to make a specific contribution to the EU-LAC Joint Initiative for Research and Innovation endorsed by the EU-LAC Summit in May 2010 in Madrid. This adds to the creation of an EU-LAC Knowledge Area on the political agenda since the Guadalajara Summit in 2004, which receives new momentum from the launch of the Joint Initiative. While all of FP7 is open to international cooperation, a number of topics specifically invite or require Latin American and Caribbean participation in three 2011 topics and several videoconferences and an infoDay are scheduled to enable strong participation.

    Source: European Commission


    Link Read more
    Link EC Research


  17. Europe heat wave sparks surge in grain prices
    2010-08-02
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade, Rural development, Environment

    Surging European grain prices following a scorching heat wave in recent weeks are likely to raise flour prices, and farmers are facing higher bills for animal feed, industry executives and analysts said. But some analysts say they doubt whether recent price rises are sustainable in view of large global grain stocks and the fact that overall grain supplies are currently still satisfactory.European grain prices have jumped around 25% in the past three weeks as hot weather and drought have hit crops just before harvesting in Western and Eastern Europe. Key Paris wheat prices were around 178 euros a tonne on Friday.
    Europe's fields 'looking like Africa'
    The heat wave has stalled grass growth, Campbell-Gibbons said. Yields on a first grass cut to make grass silage to feed to dairy cows were down 20 to 30% in early June and were down as much as 50% on a second cut in late June."The heat wave has left a lot of fields looking more like Africa rather than European meadows," one grain trader said. Hot weather has also meant cows had spent more time indoors, increasing the amount of straw needed for bedding. Campbell-Gibbons said British straw prices had risen to up to 100 pounds a tonne from about 60 pounds last year. She said farmers estimated the total increase in costs at about 1.0 to 1.5 pence per litre of milk.
    France has authorised farmers to use set-aside land to feed animals to compensate for a drop in animal feed output after the heat wave in the country in past weeks. Under the set-aside scheme, the EU pays farmers to leave land idle and not grow subsidised crops. France has given permission for the set-aside land to be used because of looming feed shortages. But the picture is better in sun-drenched Spain, where farmers are not concerned about current hot weather, which they say is not unusual for the time and comes after cereals and other similar crops have finished ripening.

    Source: Euractiv


    Link Read more
    Link Agricultural and food prices


  18. Trade in endangered species
    2010-08-02
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : ACP-EU Trade, Environment

    The 3028th Council meeting on General Affairs held in Brussels on 26 July 2010 decided not to oppose adoption by the Commission of a regulation amending Council regulation 338/97 on the protection of wild fauna and flora. The amendments implement changes to the international trade regime in endangered species agreed at the 15th session of the conference of the parties to the convention on international trade in endangered species of wild fauna and flora, held in Doha, Qatar, in March 2010.  The Commission regulation is subject to the regulatory procedure with scrutiny. Under that procedure, the Council can oppose an act that exceeds the implementing powers of the Commission, is not compatible with the aim or content of the basic instrument or does not respect the EU's principles of subsidiarity or proportionality. The Council having given its consent, the Commission may now adopt the regulation, unless the European Parliament objects.

    Source: Council of the European Union


    Link Read more
    Link Trade in Wild Fauna and Flora


  19. European External Action Service
    2010-08-02

    The 3028th Council meeting on General Affairs held in Brussels on 26 July 2010 adopted a decision establishing the European External Action Service (EEAS) and setting out its organisation and functioning (11665/1/10). Creation of the EEAS is one of the most significant changes introduced by the Treaty of Lisbon, which entered into force on 1 December 2009. It is aimed at making the EU's external action more coherent and efficient, thereby increasing the EU's influence in the world. The EEAS will assist Catherine Ashton, High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, in fulfilling her mandate. It will work in cooperation with the diplomatic services
    of the member states and comprise officials from relevant departments of the General Secretariat of the Council and of the Commission, as well as staff seconded from the national diplomatic services
    of the member states.

    Source: Council of the European Union


    Link Read more
    Link European External Action Service
    Link Policy Coherence for Development


  20. EC to provide €250 million for more than 200 new LIFE+ projects
    2010-08-02
    NEWSLETTER_CATEGORIES : Environment

    The European Commission has approved funding for 210 new projects under the third call for the LIFE+ programme (2007-2013), the European fund for the environment. The projects are from across the EU and cover actions in the fields of nature conservation, environmental policy, and information and communication. Overall, they represent a total investment of €515 million, of which the EU will provide €249.8 million. Environment Commissioner Janez Potočnik said: "The LIFE+ programme continues to fund high quality, innovative projects with a high level of added value for the EU. I believe that these new projects will not only make a significant contribution to nature conservation and to improving the environment, they will also help raise awareness across Europe of the key environmental challenges facing us, notably biodiversity loss, water scarcity and climate change." The Commission received more than 600 applications from public or private bodies from the 27 EU Member States during the call for proposals, which closed in November 2009. Of these, 210 were selected for co-funding through the programme’s three components: LIFE+ Nature and Biodiversity, LIFE+ Environment Policy and Governance and LIFE+ Information and Communication. LIFE+ Nature & Biodiversity projects improve the conservation status of endangered species and habitats. Of the 194 proposals received, the Commission selected for funding 84 projects from partnerships of conservation bodies, government authorities and other parties. Situated in 24 Member States, they represent a total investment of €224 million, of which the EU will provide some €124 million. The majority (74) are Nature projects, contributing to the implementation of the Birds and/or Habitats directives and the Natura 2000 network. The other 10 are Biodiversity projects, a LIFE+ project category for pilot schemes that tackle wider biodiversity issues. The Commission is pleased to note the steady increase in the number of Biodiversity projects funded since 2007 (four (4) projects) when the category was introduced.  LIFE+ Environment Policy & Governance projects are pilot projects that contribute to the development of innovative policy ideas, technologies, methods and instruments. Of the 308 proposals received, the Commission selected for funding 116 projects from a wide range of public and private sector organisations. The winning projects, situated in 17 Member States, represent a total investment of €278 million of which the EU will provide some €120 million. Projects targeting innovation account for the largest share of EU funding (some €20.9 million for 17 projects). The most targeted area in terms of number of projects is waste and natural resources (20 projects supported by €19.3 million), followed by water and innovation (17 projects each). The remaining 63 projects cover various topics including air, chemicals, climate change, energy, environment and health, forests, noise, soil protection, strategic approaches, and the urban environment.

    Source: European Commission


    Link Read more
    Link Projects: Nature and Biodiversity
    Link LIFE+



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CTA
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