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December 2016
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EDITO
Sunday, 04 December 2016

Development agencies must use the momentum from COP22 to prioritise water infrastructure projects and help mitigate the effects of climate change and extreme weather events in Africa, write Elke Herrfahrdt-Pähle and Waltina Scheumann. Elke Herrfahrdt-Pähle is an economist and Waltina Scheumann is a political scientist. This editorial was first published by the German Development Institute (DIE). Last Friday (18 November) marked the end of COP22 in Marrakesh, which addressed the implementation of the climate agreement signed in Paris one year ago. The accord at long last recognised that climate change adaptation is equally as important as greenhouse gas emissions reduction.

The Joint Communication Towards a renewed partnership with African, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) countries buildson the longstanding relationship with the ACP countries, which provides a good starting point to build a strong and modern alliance that is apt for the challenges of a more interdependent, complex and contested world. It should help building peaceful, stable, well-governed, prosperous and resilient states and societies at our borders and beyond and deliver on our objective of a multilateral rules-based order addressing global challenges.

According to FruitTop, Europe is expected to consume 300,000 tons of mangoes in 2016. There is increasing room for African mangoes on the European market, where currently 1 in 6 mangoes consumed are from Africa. Latin America remains the largest supplier (460,000 tons) and Peru (70,000 tons) to the EU. The season is not yet finished, but it is estimated that 50,000 tons of mangoes will be exported to Europe this year from the Ivory Coast, Senegal, Mali, Burkina Faso and Guinea.

The consequence of the possible refusal by Tanzania to sign the Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) is so great that it might undermine trade within the East African Community (EAC) and beyond, experts have warned. If Tanzania digs in to block the EPA deal with the European Union, some analysts worry, there is a high possibility that the Customs Union, which aims to ensure partner states trade freely among themselves, will suffer the biggest blow. "The Customs Union will be greatly shaken in the event that some EAC countries accept EPA while others reject it.

Thursday, 01 December 2016

Tanzania Horticulture Association's (TAHA) efforts to boost horticultural production in the country have attracted a five million US dollar (over 10bn/-) funding from Sweden. Speaking shortly after signing the five-year deal, the Deputy Head of Mission responsible for Development Corporation Division (DCD) at the Swedish Embassy in Dar es Salaam, Mr Ulf Källsting said the funding will straight go to improve production by small holder farmers struggling to meet international market standards.