Video guest: Josephine Mwangi

August 2017
M T W T F S S
31 1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31 1 2 3



SELECT_TAGS :
















Twitter

Follow the CTA Brussels Daily

 

twitter logo

 

facebook logo cta

EDITO
Saturday, 19 August 2017

In the months since it took office in January, The Gambia's new government has made trade an important part of its plans for growth, job creation, and democratic consolidation. The country featured prominently at the recent Aid for Trade Global Review at World Trade Organization headquarters in Geneva. Vice-President Fatoumata Tambajang, Minister of Trade, Regional Integration and Employment Isatou Touray and Minister of Tourism Hamat Bah attended the 11-12 July gathering, which they used to showcase domestic policy reforms and urge aid donors and the private sector to invest in building supply-side capacity in The Gambia. The International Trade Centre has been working to support The Gambia's efforts to develop trade capacity for inclusive economic growth, with a focus on creating jobs for youth and women.

The migrant crisis on Europe's doorstep has returned to the headlines. In reality, it never went away; people are fleeing war, persecution, or just seeking a better life in unprecedented numbers. The pressure will grow unless we take urgent steps to address the drivers of this crisis. In Africa, 55,000 jobs will need to be created every day just to absorb new entrants into the workforce by 2035. If the economic aspirations of this young population cannot be met in their own countries, we will see more uncontrolled and unsustainable migration. Britain is at the forefront of the response. We are taking immediate steps to protect our borders and tackle people smuggling.

The European Union (EU) says it has so far committed over 700 million euros for the development of sustainable energy in Nigeria and other ECOWAS countries from 2014 to 2020. The Head of Cooperation, EU delegation to Nigeria and ECOWAS, Mr Kurt Cornelis, said this in Abuja on Monday at a workshop on policy and regulation for clean energy mini-grids and renewable energy in ECOWAS region. Cornelis said access to electricity and promotion of sustainable energy solutions were at the core of EU’s cooperation with the region, hence the provision of the grants to ECOWAS countries.

The European Union and Nigeria on Monday agreed to facilitate EU investment flow into Nigeria. Ambassador and Head of EU delegation to Nigeria and ECOWAS, Michel Arion, made this known in Abuja at a political dialogue between a Nigerian delegation led by Foreign Affairs Minister, Geoffrey Onyeama, and 20 representatives of EU’s member states in Nigeria. Arion said: “I will say that what we can do is to facilitate the EU investment in Nigeria which will be absolutely key, not only at the level of bilateral relations but in other fora.” He said that the meeting focused on Buhari’s three-point agenda of security, economy and corruption as well as others which include irregular migration and the humanitarian situation in the North East.

The further you travel from Brussels, the likelier people are to see Brexit as an opportunity. I’m in Kampala, discussing post-EU commercial prospects with business and political leaders from across East Africa. While not everyone here started as a Leaver, there is now a widespread hope that Brexit will lead to more open trade arrangements, above all in farming, which employs two thirds of Africa’s workforce. The EU’s Common Agricultural Policy treats Africa as an economic colony. Brussels applies tariffs to tomato sauce, but not to tomatoes; to chocolate, but not to cocoa beans; to roasted coffee, but not to green coffee.